Types of Sales Roles in B2B Publishing

Types of Sales Roles B2B

Types of Sales Roles in B2B Publishing

There are many different types of sales roles within publishing. It is worth asking what type of sales role you are applying for, and highlighting which type you’ve done on your CV, when applying for a job.

Our Sales Consultant in the London office, Olivia, has put together a list of the key types of sales roles to explain further.

The key types are:

  • Delegate – selling delegate spaces (i.e. tickets) to attend events and conferences
  • Sponsorship – selling sponsorship opportunities for events. It can also refer to sponsored editorial content, which is when companies pay to publish an article in your publication as a way of promoting their own brand.
  • Advertising – selling advertising space. Can be either print (e.g. a print publication or magazine) or online (eg. a website). It can also be classified (i.e. no graphics, inexpensive small messages) or display (these include graphics and colour and might take up half a page or more).
  • Subscriptions – selling a subscription to a product. Can be print (e.g. a print publication or magazine) or digital (e.g. an online database or service).
  • Conference production – this isn’t really classified as media sales. It’s basically a varied mix of sales, marketing, editorial and project management but for entry level conference production roles clients usually want someone with some sales experience, such as delegate sales.

A B2B Sales role, for example, could involve just one or several of these types of sales. It’s quite common to see delegate and sponsorship sales together or delegate and subscriptions.

Generally the skill set required for each type of sales role, and the types of clients they deal with, will be similar. But it’s always best to check with our consultants beforehand which ones the role involves just to avoid confusion.

For more information about Sales roles you can view our current vacancies page and select Sales in preferences.

You can also contact us on info@atwoodtate.co.uk or 020 7034 7900. Or via social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

 

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How to Use Blogging to Get into Publishing

How to use Blogging to get into Publishing

How to Use Blogging to Get into Publishing

How relevant is blogging to publishing? You’d be surprised. Blogging is not a hobby you should start specifically to enter publishing, but if you have one: mention it!

Blogging is a growing hobby, and a new career choice, in the 21st century. Having a blog gives people a platform to discuss what they want and voice their own opinions. But it also gives you the opportunity to work with others across multiple fields of industry. Not to mention develops skills in your own time which can help you in the long-run.

If you’re just starting out and are looking for an entry-level role within publishing, blogging is a great skill to have! So long as you have some work experience to back it up, blogging can tip the balance on whether or not you get an interview or even a job!

There are many different types of blogs, and all can help you gain many skills, from Coding, Design, Marketing, networking and more! But within the Publishing industry specifically book blogging is a very relevant skill!

Book blogging, or booktubing (video blogging), gives you the chance to voice your opinions about books and the latest book trends. A book blogger can write reviews, top ten lists, trend-reviews and more and each of these topics has some relevance to publishing. If you’re an established book blogger you may even work with publishers; taking part in blog tours, hosting giveaways and Q&As and attending book events.

Through communicating with publishers through these events, and voicing your own opinions, shows a potential employee that you understand the industry. You can see trends, converse with professionals and work to deadlines in a creative and independent manner.

This is relevant to all sectors, be it Trade or B2B, and all roles from IT, Editorial, Publicity and more!

It also shows an interest outside of work, which suggests to a future employer that you are a reliable candidate with a keen sense of the publishing industry.

Whether you’re a book blogger or not; blogging is skill to add to your CV!

Here some things you can highlight to show how blogging is useful to you:

  • Commitment: The longer you’ve been blogging the better. This shows commitment and creative thinking, and also proves that you can work well independently.
  • Networking: If you’ve worked with brands or publishers mention it on your CV. Not only does it prove your communicational skills, but also shows an understanding of the industries you mention. This is particularly good if the brands are relevant to the job you’re applying for.
  • Social Media and SEO abilities: Have you got 1000 twitter followers because of your blog publicity? Mention it! Do you understand SEO? Mention it!
  • Coding: If you’ve altered your HTML yourself or have learnt about it then put that down as a skill. For more information about HTML and how to do it, look at our series of posts here!
  •  Design: Did you design your blog, or make your own graphics/headers? Have you got original artwork or worked with others to create artwork? Put it on your CV.

There are so many relevant and useful skills which can be a real pull to employers when looking at CV.

Make sure you have other work experience to back up your blog experiences, but also be sure to highlight the skills you have learnt through blogging! It could mean the difference between getting a job interview and getting a job when you’re first starting out!

Need any more tips about how to enter publishing? Take a look at our Work Experience & Entry-Level Resources!

For more advice, or if you have any questions, get in touch via any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Beanstalk | Story Starters

Beanstalk Story Starters

Beanstalk | Story Starters

Last month our chosen charity, Beanstalk, received some fantastic news! They were awarded £1million by the DreamFund (People’s Postcode Lottery) for their partnership ‘Story Starters’!

‘Story Starters’ is a collaborative project, which will see Beanstalk working with Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library and LuCiD at the University of Liverpool. They will be working together to help children from disadvantaged backgrounds, receive one-to-one support and mentoring to develop their language and reading skills!

Beanstalk is a national literacy charity who recruits volunteers to work in primary schools with children to help them develop their reading. Volunteers are specially trained to spend 30 minutes, two times a week, reading with a child one-to-one for a whole year. To help children develop the truly important skill of reading. In 2016 alone Beanstalk helped over 11,000 children across the UK, in deprived areas, and with this funding they can help many more.

Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library is a global programme operating worldwide, with more than 1 million children receiving books per month, to help them fall in love with reading. LuCiD is a research collaboration which is researching how children learn to communicate with language.

Beanstalk

The CEO of Beanstalk, Ginny Lunn, and the Beanstalk partners receiving their DreamFund cheque – all rights attributed to Beanstalk

Previous research has shown that support within schools at schools can benefit children throughout their life. 20% are more likely to get 5 A*-C GCSE’s and earn more as adults.

This is a very exciting time for Beanstalk and we couldn’t be more pleased for them. With the £1million funding they will be able to recruit and train a further 600 Story Starter volunteers and help 1,800 children between 3-5 years old to develop their reading!

Beanstalk is a truly worthwhile charity and we’re happy to support them! If you would like to learn more about Beanstalk, and Story Starters make sure you check out there website!

Be sure to check out our previous fundraising challenge for them, and let us know your ideas for the next! You can send us your ideas via social media or commenting on this blog post: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

 

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Writing a Winning Sales CV

Writing a Winning Sales CV

Writing a Winning Sales CV

Creating the perfect CV is one of the most important things for any job seeker. But particularly so for sales people. Where a journalist can submit samples of their writing or a designer a portfolio of work, as a sales person your CV has to do most of the talking.

Having reviewed many CVs in my time in recruitment, I’ve come to identify what makes an effective and well written CV for sales roles. There are many simple bits of information that candidates miss out which may affect their chances of being considered for a job.

So you don’t make the same mistake, I’ve compiled some guidelines of key things to include!

Whether a second jobber or an experienced sales manager you should include:

  • Sales figures – Where possible you should include details of revenue achieved, targets met, sales made etc… Always make sure they are honest and that you can back them up if asked about them in an interview.
  • Achievements – You should give examples of particular successes you’ve had, whether securing a large deal, signing on a new client…
  • Products & clients – If you’ve worked for a large organisation do specify what area of the business or publication you worked on or what type of products you were selling. It’s also useful to know who you were selling to or specific regions you dealt with.
  • Languages – If you have professional competency in more than one language and would be willing to use it at work, tell us! It might be just what a particular client is looking for.
  • Travel – If you are used to travelling a lot and enjoy it, it’s good to know and if applying for field sales positions, do mention if you have a clean driving licence and car.
  • Line management – If you’ve managed staff, say how many and whether they were office or field based.

Last but not least, being a successful sales person is often very much about your personality so don’t be afraid to let this show on your CV. Also remember that you need strong communication skills and to be well presented and professional so your CV should demonstrate this.

For more general advice on CV layout, you should visit https://atwoodtatepublishingjobs.co.uk/advice/.

If you have any questions get in touch via social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Companies: Why You Should Consider Temps

Why You Should Consider Temps

Companies: Why You Should Consider Temps

Our articles on temping have typically been to inform candidates of the many benefits that come with temping, both professionally and personally. But today, we’d like to point out the many reasons why temping is such a useful avenue for clients to consider.

  • The flexibility of temps also means company flexibility.

If you’re expanding your team but you’re not quite prepared to hire a permanent person, a temporary employee is a great way to establish exactly what it is you need in terms of additional resources. Maybe you’ve never had extra hands on deck and you’re only now starting to realise the new objectives you can tackle. A temp-to-perm scenario can be a match made in heaven for company and employee alike. As someone grows into a newly created role and reveals the kind of results that can be produced with more staff. The manager can then take these results to HR as Exhibit A on what expanding the team can mean for everyone.

But more than that,

  • Temps bring their own expertise with them.

They don’t need to be entry-level candidates acting as a stop-gap. By hiring consultants or veteran freelancers, a company also gets to avail of a temporary worker’s own experiences, the different business practices they’ve witnessed in their time. New blood often means new ideas and even if the worker doesn’t stick around, their contributions can last forever.

And, of course,

  • Temporary workers can provide much needed breathing space to permanent employees.

When the day-to-day administration is taken off their hands, they’re able to concentrate on the bigger picture and implement the projects. This improve service and streamline practices. You can get a lot done when you don’t have to sweat the small stuff. Even if it’s only for a little while.

So, for anyone who’s currently reviewing team numbers or work-loads, don’t commit until you know for sure exactly what you need – try a temp today! Get in touch with Kellie Millar, who manages our Temps and Freelancers desk, or her colleague, Alison Redfearn, and they can send you more workers than you can shake a stick at!

5 reasons to get a temp:

  • Cover sick leave
  • Cover holiday
  • Help with a project
  • Flexibility – have for 1 day / 1 week / 1 month…
  • No admin – we cover all payment, NI, holiday pay, pension

Kellie Millar
E: kelliemillar@atwoodtate.co.uk
Tel: 02070347897

Alison Redfearn
E: alisonredfearn@atwoodtate.co.uk
Tel: 02070347922

You can also contact us with any questions via our social media pages: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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5 Reasons Why You Should Attend the London Book Fair 2017

London Book Fair 2017

5 Reasons Why You Should Attend the London Book Fair 2017

The London Book Fair 2017 is fast approaching. It will be happening on the 14th-16th of March at the beautiful Olympia in Hammersmith.

It is an opportunity for all those in the publishing industry to meet and discuss publishing, with the main focus of the fair being on the literary agents as they sell book rights in the International Rights Centre. This is an event to learn, observe and discover the latest trends within publishing, with a lot of publishing’s finest under one roof.

The exhibition floors will be filled with publishers, agents, recruitment consultants and writers. It is a brilliant place to mingle and learn more about the publishing industry if you any, or wanting to be, any of the above.

Here are 5 Reasons why you should attend the London Book Fair:

  • There is a Careers Clinic and recruitment agencies attending

Bring your CV and book a place at the Career’s Clinic. At the clinic you get 5 minutes to speak to a specialist recruitment agent who can discuss jobs and offer advice, and even take your CV for further review.

We will be attending the Careers Clinic, as we did last year, with our consultants offering advice. More info on this over the next few weeks!

Recruitment agencies will also have their own stands throughout the fair, at which you can approach them for a chat.

  • Networking Opportunities

Yes, that dreaded word appears again. The London Book Fair has a busy atmosphere, but it is the perfect place to meet people within the publishing industry, and ask questions where suitable.

Each publisher within the industry will have their own stand, but there are other opportunities to network as well: seminars, meetings and clinics. Also queues! The queues for food can sometimes get quite large but you can always strike up a conversation at this point. Be open and friendly.

For more advice on Networking check out this blog post our temps team administrator Michael did!

  • Seminars & Meetings

The London Book Fair also includes seminars and discussions for anyone to attend. Some require paid tickets, but most are free – but you do need to book beforehand! Check out the LBF Insight Guide for a look at all of the seminars at the event!

You could attend the Byte the Book Networking event on the 14th of March or attend the Careers Clinic. Or, if you’re a writer, book a meeting with the Society of Authors.

  • The Publishing Sectors

The London Book Fair is the perfect opportunity to learn more about all the sectors of publishing. From Academic to B2B, Trade to Print and Production.

From viewing the stands to networking with the stand-holders, this is a great opportunity to learn more about the publishing industry as a whole. With over 2000 exhibitors over three days this is a fascinating experience for anyone looking to enter the publishing world.

  • Attend with Friends

This is a great event to attend with fellow publishing candidates, be it already in publishing or looking to enter the industry. It can be a lot easier to mingle with others when you have a friend to go with you, and the event is quite social.

You can always grab a coffee or some food at one of the many cafes, discuss the event, walk around together or attend seminars together. It is much a social event as it is a professional one.

Make sure you book your LBF ticket in advance though. Tickets cost £40 per person for the three day fair. Book here!

So there are 5 reasons to attend the London Book Fair 2017. We will be releasing more information as we creep nearer to the event! And we can’t wait to see you at the Careers Clinic. Don’t leave it too long before you book your place at the clinic, these places tend to go quickly!

Want to learn more about the London Book Fair? Check out there website or follow them on Twitter. They will be live tweeting throughout the day, as will many other publishers, so keep an eye on social media over the week.

You can also follow us on social media to stay up to date: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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BETT Show 2017 | Event

BETT show 2017

BETT show 2017

Alison and I had a good look around the BETT show last week – this is the main exhibition for all things in education and a great opportunity to find out the latest in education technology.

Bett 2017

As ever, there was a mix of educational publishing companies (or information providers as some prefer to be known) and new technological innovations. It’s exciting to see so many people involved in the cutting edge of classroom activities and the Steam area was very lively (loved the pun on STEM)!

Bett 2017 1

Some of our publishing clients were there including Hodder Education and Rising Stars, GL Education & GL Assessment, Oxford University Press, Macmillan Education to name a few. It’s always good to see the latest products in the flesh so to speak and meet some of the teams to hear about it in person.

Bett 2017 OUP

We didn’t have time to go to many, but there were seminars and talks covering all aspects of learning across primary, secondary, further, higher and SEN. Check out some of the Highlights and blogs.

Here are some useful links to keep up to speed:

And there’s a #Bettchat weekly on a Tuesday 4.30pm!

Also of interest and happening this week is the Learning Technologies exhibition and conference incorporating Learning & Skills and covers all things to do with learning and development at work.

Let us know what you thought of the BETT show and whether or not you’re attending the Learning Technologies exhibition! We have a full list of events on our events page so check that out for more details of what we’ll be up to over the next month!

You can contact us on any of our social media sites and take part in our regular Twitter Q&A’s using the hashtag #AskAtwood:  Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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New Year, New Goals 2017

New Year, New Goals

New Year, New Goals

January is a tough month. The Christmas buzz has worn off and the bills for the holiday period hang over everything. It’s a tough time to think about future prospects but concentrating on your next step can be a great way to shake this feeling off.

But now that it’s finished, it might be time to consider a new job. Our clients have returned from the holidays, looking to fill roles that were put on hold before the Christmas break. Check out our website to see the latest roles we’re working on and if you see something of interest, get in touch with the relevant consultant. If you don’t see anything you like, drop us a line anyway. Let us know you’re looking and what it is you want. The first step is the hardest but once you’ve started the search, everything else will fall into place.

For those considering a move into publishing, why not consider temping? 2016 saw an increase in temporary roles, following the post-Brexit scare. Temp roles are a great way to join a company that is looking for additional resources but who regularly discover along the way that they need someone on a permanent basis. The work isn’t going away so guess what? Neither are you!

For more information on our current temporary roles, contact Kellie Millar, our Temps/Freelancers Manager, or Alison Redfearn. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram where we post our latest roles or sign up for Job Alerts on our website and receive a notification as soon as they go live.

So, with January done and dusted, it’s time to really tackle the new year! Take a risk, find the job you really want to be working in, even if it’s only a contract role, and make 2017 a game-changer!

Make sure you share this post so we can help others too! And get in touch via our website, phone or any of our social media accounts:  on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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How to Get Ahead in Academic Publishing

Today we have a guest post from Academic Professional: Suzanne Kavanagh.Suzanne Kavanagh Academic Book Week

 

Suzanne Kavanagh has worked in publishing for over 20 years, most recently as Director of Marketing and Membership Services at ALPSP. You can contact her via @sashers or suzanne.kavanagh@gmx.com.

 

How to Get Ahead in Academic Publishing

Armed with a fistful of crumpled CVs and an Art History degree, I trudged up and down Charing Cross Road looking for a bookselling job. I’d set my heart on working in publishing in my third year at uni, but trawling through The Guardian I realised it would be hard for me to stand out from hundreds of applicants who, no doubt, also felt just as passionately about books and read voraciously as I did. I figured bookselling would be a good starting point.

This was the first time I’d considered what I had to offer. It made me think about how selling jeans in a shop provided influencing, negotiation and questioning skills. I realised that bar work provided customer service and conflict resolution skills (as well as excess consumption of warm white wine…essential for low budget book launches). Fast forward a few weeks and I was happily ensconced at a specialist art bookseller.

Aside from a borderline obsession with alphabetising each section and secretly sniffing new stock, I learned a lot that would be relevant for my career.

It was pretty cutting edge for *coughs* 1993 *coughs*. We had a PC networked stock management system. We used this to mail out subject leaflets to customers around the world. I used my enthusiasm and retail experience to help customers find the book they were after and proved to be an occasional foil to the sometimes-grumpy owner.

My first job at a small trade publisher was in the sales and marketing team. I dealt with bibliographic information, wrote jacket blurbs, marketing copy and produced the new titles catalogue. I got to know everyone in the company and gained a real insight into the publishing process.

But the low salary made it hard to live in London. Sound familiar?

Meanwhile a friend kept telling me about the publisher she worked at. They published academic texts for students, researchers and professionals in the humanities and social sciences. She loved working there. And she was paid quite a bit more than me. Academic publishing had never occurred: I’d always assumed that publishing meant fiction, poetry and pictures. But the facts speak for themselves.

The UK Government’s Department for Culture, Media and Sport reports that the publishing sector employed 200,000 people in 2015 – an increase of 3.7% on the year before. (Source: DCMS 2016 Focus on Creative Industries report). These figures include book, journal, newspapers, magazines and database publishing. However, in 2011, Creative Skillset reported the breakdown by sub-sector: Journals and Periodicals employed 26% of the workforce and Book Publishing 17% and Academic is drawn from both these categories.

In May 2016 the UK Publishers Association reported that total sales of book and journal publishing were up to £4.4 billion in 2015. Academic journal publishing was up 5% to £1.1 billion and there were £1.42 billion export revenues with two thirds of this figure in education, academic and ELT (English Language Teaching). (Source: PA Statistics Yearbook 2015 news release)

Academic is a vibrant sector employing a lot of people and is a major economic driver in the creative industries.

My second publishing job was at that academic publisher promoting journals and reference works. When asked why I wanted the job, the answer was clear: I’d relish working with books that support education, research and the furthering of knowledge. I got the job and – to my surprise and delight – a decent pay rise.

The great thing about many academic publishers is that they tend to be large organisations with more opportunity for training and promotion. I took all options open to me. I applied for internal jobs to learn about different lists and improve my skills. I was curious, enthusiastic, worked and played hard. I got to know people, respected different departments and personalities it took to run the business. Roles included Marketing Coordinator, Executive, Manager, Senior Manager.

Since then I’ve had the privilege of working in a range of organisations including Taylor & Francis, Continuum and the Association of Learned & Professional Society Publishers. I saw first hand how diverse the sector is at ALPSP, an international trade body for not-for-profit organisations. Their members include the American Historical Association, the Royal Society of Chemistry, the OECD, SAGE, as well as all the larger commercial companies like Elsevier and Springer Nature. There are a lot of publishers covering pretty much all disciplines.

I know it seems obvious, but the biggest lesson I’ve learnt is that job mobility and training go hand in hand with progressing your career.

You may start in one department/role. That doesn’t preclude you moving to others where your experience is applied in different ways. There are plenty of opportunities with more specialist jobs where, with the right training, you can become expert in a particular niche.

When I started out, it was relatively simple: assistant / coordinator / executive / manager roles in sales / marketing / production / editorial. And now? Well a quick glance through the Atwood Tate vacancy list tells a story. Roles like ‘Predictive Analytics and Insight Specialist’ and ‘Instructional Designer’ sit alongside Product Editor and Marketing Executive. It’s a taste of how the industry is changing. If you move roles, and learn new skills, you’re more likely to get on.

So what does the future hold for you and what skills do you need to be successful? There are three main areas you need to plot your profile against. Where do you map yourself on this chart? Where do you want to be? This is by no means exhaustive, but provides insight into where the industry will be.

Academic Flow chart

My final advice for working in academic publishing?

  1. Be curious: ask open questions, listen and learn
  2. Read industry publications, blogs and research
  3. Remember you’re dealing with people: be courteous, build your network
  4. Take every training opportunity – from free webinars to paid-for courses
  5. Enjoy it! You’re giving something back to advancing human knowledge.

 

We thank Suzanne for her wonderful guest post!

For more information about Academic Book Week, and more information about academic publishing, see the official website and the Twitter feed.

If you are a publishing professional and would be interested in writing a guest post for Atwood Tate just get in touch.

Please email: eleanorpilcher@atwoodtate.co.uk or get in touch via any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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The Academic Publishing Sector

Academic Publishing Header

Academic Publishing

In keeping with Academic Book Week (#AcBookWeek), today’s blog we’re discussing the Academic Sector in all its glory.

Most candidates, particularly new candidates to publishing, tend to overlook academic publishing. But Academic Publishing is a cutting edge and often a very exciting sector to work in!

An academic publisher publishes journals, books, articles and monographs on the latest findings within academic research. The content is often written by researchers and academics within a specific area of research – such as historians, doctors and scientists – and it is normally peer reviewed by fellow scholars of the same topic.

There is a lot of crossover between Academic Publishing and STM (Science, Technical, Medical) but we categorise them into two separate sectors at Atwood Tate.

Suitability within Academic Publishing

Many fields within academia have their own publications in which to publish their findings. These are the societies and publishers for which you would be applying to work for.

As such a degree, PhD, or a background within non-fiction publishing, or an evidential interest in a topic of academia, is preferable to many employers within academic publishing. Some more so than others. It often depends on the specifics of a role.

For an entry-level role in Academic publishing we recommend you gain as much as admin experience as possible. With regards to sales, design, marketing and other roles within publishing, a clear interest in academic publishing can be enough to be considered for a role. Also, if you have experience working within the higher education sector in some way this can also be useful. It shows a developed insight into the academic market and customers.

The skills and academic background required is dependent on the publisher in question.

If we have a role within academic publishing which you are interested in but are unsure of the qualifications required, feel free to ask us for clarification. We will be able to let you know what is required and discuss the role further.

What type of Publishers are Academic Publishers:

There are many different types of academic publishers. Here are some examples of the companies we’ve worked with before.

Many University establishments have their own academic presses, such as:

  • Oxford University Press
  • Manchester University Press
  • Cambridge University Press

But there are also societies and specific academic publishers, such as:

  • The Biochemical Society
  • Elsevier
  • Taylor & Francis
  • Springer

These are just some of many Academic Publishers in the UK, some of which have positions internationally as well.

Due to the exciting nature of the published content within academic publishing, this is a great sector in which to have a career. You can work on the latest research and publish exciting findings across many different topics. You can also work in an industry which is very often ahead of other publishing sectors, in terms of publishing innovations such as digital publishing, online platforms etc. It is as intellectually challenging as it is creative.

Interested in a role in Academic Publishing? Want to know more about the sector? Get in touch:

And make sure you check out the Twitter Feed and official website for #AcBookWeek.

Let us know what you would like to learn about next on our blog on our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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