Team Update

It’s an exciting time to be in recruitment right now, and that is evident by the changes in the Atwood Tate line-up!

We’re delighted to announce that Claire Louise Kemp and Karine Nicpon have both been promoted to Senior Consultants!

Christina Dimitradi, currently coCD photo 2015vering consultant Catherine Roney’s maternity leave, has been made permanent so she’ll continue working with us when Catherine returns in January. Christina handles all Editorial (Trade, Academic, Educational, Professional, Associations, Charities and Societies), Rights, International Sales and Contracts roles.
christina@atwoodtate.co.uk
020 7034 7902
Linked in

 

Lucy Slater

Lucy Slater has been promoted from Administrator to Consultant, and is now covering Production, Production Editorial, Data, Research and Analytics, Digital/IT, Design, Distribution and Operation roles.
lucyslater@atwoodtate.co.uk
020 7034 7821
Linked in

 

 

Ellie LinkedIn imageEleanor (Ellie) Pilcher is our new Administrator, currently covering Katie Hargreaves maternity leave until she returns in January. Get in touch with her for any queries regarding your profile, updates or registering with Atwood Tate.
eleanorpilcher@atwoodtate.co.uk
020 7034 7900
Linked in

 

You can find more about our team at our Meet the Team page and for a full list of all our contact info, here’s a link to our Organisation structure which also tells you who covers what job roles/sectors in our London and Oxford offices.

Don’t forget to Link in with your Consultant to keep track of new job vacancies, industry news and events.

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Top Tips for Temps

Top Tips for Temps

Here on the temps and freelance desk, we know how tricky temping can be for newcomers. That’s why we’ve put together some helpful tips to guide you!

  • Listen up

It’s your first day. You’ve just met the team. They’ve been doing this job for a while now, how do you make a good impression? Listen closely. The sooner you understand exactly what’s required, the sooner you can get started. Temps who respond quickly and effectively are a dream for our busy clients. If you can hit the ground running, you’ll never be out of work!

  • Get to know people

This one’s pretty straightforward but it doesn’t just apply to your team or your line manager. Get to know the company, the different departments and what they do. Being a temp is like being the new kid at school – you can make this a lot easier by getting to know your colleagues across the board. An anecdote here, a joke there, soon you’ll be joining them for lunch or a cheeky drink at five in their beloved local.

  • Remember your timesheet!

If you’ve never temped before, this is quite an easy mistake to make. You’ve showed up, you’ve done the work, it’s time to go home, right? Afraid not. As a temp, you’ll need to submit your hours every week for approval. The smartest thing to do is set a calendar reminder to submit every Friday. That way, it gives your line manager time to approve and prevents you having to make a panicky phone call to your agency at the eleventh hour. Most agencies have a very straightforward process for this so it only takes a minute – get it out of the way and enjoy your weekend!

  • Prove yourself 

Volunteer for extra assignments. Check if your line manager needs a hand with anything – they don’t always delegate everything and it can impress them when you ask for more than they’ve given you. This makes the right impression so when it comes to hiring a permanent employee, they realise the perfect person has been with them all along. We’ve placed lots of temps who ended up going permanent because they went the extra mile.

  • Stay in touch with your agency

This is important because as an agency, we are in touch with HR all the time. We feedback to you and let you know when they’re happy with your work – and, most importantly, if they’re considering keeping you on longer. We can also let you know about other roles we have in that might interest you so you can move smoothly from one position to another with as little fuss as possible. We’re here to help so give us a call or drop us a line at any time.

  • What are you good at? What do you like?

The beauty of temping is discovering what you’re good at and what actually interests you. Temps often carry out a lot of ad hoc duties, sometimes providing support to different departments. This can help you to figure out what you enjoy the most, whether it’s communications, administration, financial aspects, data analysis – and once you know, you can set your sights on that specific role. You can let us know too and we’ll be sure to let you know if we have any suitable jobs in.

  • Holiday

Finally, holiday. As a temp, you won’t have a set amount of holidays like a permanent employee. Instead, you will accrue holiday at a percentage of your hours. Your agency can let you know how much holiday you have to take so you can save it up or use it to cover that long-awaited trip of yours. The longer you temp for, the more holiday you’ll accrue so it’s good to plan ahead.

That’s it for handy tips. But remember, when you temp with us, we’re always here to advise and guide you so if you’re not sure, just pick up the phone!

The Temps Team:

Kellie Millar, Manager (Temps/Freelancers)

Tel:    020 7034 7897         Email: kelliemillar@atwoodtate.co.uk

Alison Redfearn, Temps/Freelancers Consultant

Tel:    020 7034 7922         Email: alisonredfearn@atwoodtate.co.uk

Michael Lawlor, Temps/Freelancers Administrator

Tel:    020 7034 7899         Email: michaellawlor@atwoodtate.co.uk

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Ten Things you should never say in an Interview

Ten Things

Interviews can be scary and sometimes we say things which we really shouldn’t! Here are ten things you should never say in an interview.

  1.  ‘I don’t know – If you don’t know the answer to a question ask them to re-phrase it. ‘I don’t understand’ is ten times better than ‘I don’t know’. If the question they ask is something like ‘Where do you see yourself in five years’ time’ definitely don’t say ‘I don’t know!’ Talk about your career plan, your ideal future, anything but ‘I don’t know.’
  2. I hate my old boss! – Imagine how this looks to a prospective new boss. Answer: not good. It’s not the right attitude and it isn’t the right etiquette for an interview. No matter the circumstances with regards to the parting of the ways, you should never bad-mouth professionals to other professionals, particularly in interviews!
  3. ‘What is your sick leave and absence policy? – This is a worrying thing for an interviewer to hear. If you’re asking about time off before you’ve got the job then why employ you in the first place? If you have a long-term illness or an unwell family member/friend under your care, then by all means let the employee know, if they need too, but never ask about sick/absence policy during an interview.
  4. What does your company do?’ – Not only does this show poor preparation it also shows lack of interest. If an interviewer has one job and five applicants, and you ask this question then they are not going to employ you. Even if you have the best CV. Understanding your prospective role in a company and having knowledge of the company itself is crucial to surviving in a job, not to mention an interview. You should always prepare for an interview by looking at the company’s website and the job description given!
    Interviews
  5. I just want a job!’ – Many of us have been in that situation when all you want is a job or a change of scene, but saying this in an interview is unsuitable and off-putting. It will make the interviewer doubt whether you are there because you are genuinely interested in the position, or if you are simply trying to earn a wage.
  6. *BEEP* – Don’t swear! It will make you come across as aggressive, rude and inappropriate. You’ll put off your interviewer and may well end the interview early, depending on the severity of the language and the context it is in.
  7. Where did you get your shoes?!’ – There is a time and place for questions and compliments like this – the interview room is not one of them! It is distracting and inappropriate, and if shoes (or other physical attributes) are the first thing on your mind when you enter an interview then you won’t come across as professional or good candidate material.
  8. No, I don’t have any questions – This shows a lack of interest! If the interviewer has been incredibly thorough throughout the interview, or your mind goes blank from an information overload, ask them to repeat something – the wage range, what training is offered, who you will report to etc. It shows regard whereas simply asking nothing will bring the interview to an abrupt end, and it can quickly become awkward with you coming across as disinterested. Not the lasting impression you want.
  9. I’m Motivated, Reliable, Organised, Creative & Intuitive’ – Never say just these 5 things when asked ‘Describe yourself in 5 (+/-) words’, they are over-used and almost always a cover for not knowing how to answer. Instead of these use less-used or more exciting adjectives like: ambitious, punctual, honest, confident, diligent…among others. Stand out from the crowd and mean what you say!
  10. So when do I start?’ – Be confident Yes! Arrogant no!

 

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The London Digital Book Printing Forum

I recently attended an event for print and production professionals – the London Digital Book Printing Forum at The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA).

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The event give updates on the key trends and issues in the book market, looking at both  the supply chain and book manufacturing, including the status of digital printing. I made it to the afternoon session where speakers covered:

Market Evolution and Emergence of New Business Models: Some of the key players in book publishing, distribution, and manufacturing gave their insights on the changes occurring in print procurement and book distribution, and on the impact of digital printing on the streamlining of the supply chain.

Richard Fidczuk, Production Director at SAGE Publications spoke passionately about their use of digital – they publish 250 books a year and over 500 journals with most journals still being print rather than digital. They printed their first frontlist digital 4 colour title in March 2016 and most reprints are now printed digitally to reduce stock and print runs. In terms of the impact of digital on the supply chain, it means books never need to go out of print. They can also print locally in many different locations which is useful for new books with no sales history.

We also heard from Paul Major, Global Senior Procurement Manager, Oxford University Press and David Taylor, Senior Vice President, Content Acquisition International, Ingram Content Group.  All of the speakers agreed keeping stock in warehouses was much reduced nowadays due to print on demand options.

We also heard about some innovations from international publishers, the one that really caught my eye was Frédéric Mériot, Managing Director, Presses Universitaires de France (PUF) talking about sending a ‘statement of disruption’ to the market. They opened a shop in Paris to print their own list (and 3 million Google titles). It’s proved a huge success – you can go in, select a book, get a coffee and the Espresso book machine will print your book while you wait – and with a personalised message if you wish!

It was also great to hear from some smaller publishers in the ‘Medium & Small Publishers’ Points of View’ section. Their workflows and requirements are often very different to the larger publishers but all were using digital printing and POD to some degree. Michelle Jones, Production Manager, IWA Publishing said they need to be flexible and open to new technology and they often select a print process on a book by book basis based on price, quality etc.  Claire Watts, Production Manager, Oldcastle Books agreed the POD option would be good for reasons of cost and the environment. Anne Beech, Managing Director, Pluto Press said her colleagues can tell the difference between a litho and digitally printed books (but it’s less likely the readers would) and that POD is the hidden saviour of the small publisher.  Daniele Och, Production Director, Zed Books said 90% of their frontlist and all backlist titles are printed digitally and it’s essential to their business to have good digital printing options.

And lastly Jane Hyne, Production Manager, National Gallery Company gave an insight into how she has been working with digital printing to produce high quality colour books.

Overall it was a good opportunity to catch up on production and printing news, terminology and what the future might hold.

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Penguin Living – Careers 360 Immersion Day 11th September

Penguin Living, a new initiative from Penguin Random House, is launching a great series of events to promote authors and experts specialising in personal development. We’re really delighted to be involved in the very first one – the Careers 360 Immersion Day on 11th September.

The day will involve a series of talks with workshop elements from selected authors and experts – authors confirmed so far are Tim Vincent, the author of Nail That Interview, Caroline Goyder, author of Gravitas, Alice Olins and Phanella Mayall Fine, authors of Step Up – Confidence, Success and Your Stellar Career in 10 Minutes a Day, John Williams, author of Screw Work, Break Free, Bill Burnett and Dave Evans, authors of Designing your LifeBuild a Life That Works for You, and Kevin Rodgers, author of Why Aren’t They Shouting? Books will be on sale throughout the day.

The brand’s overarching aim is to “empower people to live life better” by making best use of its authors’ ideas, advice and insight.

The day, priced £15 per session or £40 for the whole day, will be divided into three segments: “Applying for Jobs”, “Improving your Career” and “Career Choices”, with PRH’s authors and experts – including Atwood Tate! – offering tips on how to give a great interview, changing careers and flexible working.

Check out the Penguin Living website, www.penguinliving.co.uk, the Twitter handle is @PenguinLivingUK and hashtag #DoItBetter.

        Tim Vincent                 Caroline Goyder                    Alice Olins                   Phanella Mayall Fine

tim_vincentcaroline_goyderalice_olinsphanella_mayall_fine

 

 

 

 

              

   Kevin Rodgers                     Dave Evans                      Bill Burnett                      John Williams       

 kevin_rodgersDave Evans110625.BruceHeimanWeddingjohn_williams2 

 

 

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The World of Temping

Temp job

It’s a fast paced world in temping. Companies can’t always predict when they’ll need someone. The requirements can come fast and without notice – and that’s where we come in. We have a huge database of temps at our disposal, ready and willing to take on short-term placements. They aren’t afraid of being dropped in at the deep end and they love the opportunity to meet new people and work in varied environments. And that’s where you come in!

We’re always looking for new temps, especially those who can start right away. When a job comes in and our clients need someone tomorrow, we provide a rapid response service – but we’re only as good as our temp pool!

Sometimes, there isn’t even time for a face to face interview. In the past, we’ve put temps forward and the client has asked for just a quick, informal phone call so they can ask some relevant questions and gauge a candidate’s answers. For some of you who have gone to second and third interviews, not to mention written and online tests, this might come as something of a shock. But really, that’s how quick it can be sometimes – you might hear from us on Monday and start working on Tuesday.

And we have a good memory here at Atwood Tate. We remember the temps who came through time and again, who always impress our clients and who are guaranteed to meet the job requirements. We’re like an old friend, checking in, keeping you in mind, remembering what you excel at and what you’re looking for. Sometimes, our temps move directly from one role to another, developing new skills and furthering their careers step by step.

So, if you’re looking for pastures new, get in touch today! Next week could be a whole lot different than you expected.

You can sign up for instant job alerts here.

Follow our Twitter feed as we post jobs and industry news.

Link in with Kellie or Alison to keep in touch.

The Temps Team:

Kellie Millar, Manager (Temps/Freelancers)

Tel:    020 7034 7897         Email: kelliemillar@atwoodtate.co.uk

Alison Redfearn, Temps/Freelancers Consultant

Tel:    020 7034 7922         Email: alisonredfearn@atwoodtate.co.uk

Michael Lawlor, Temps/Freelancers Administrator

Tel:    020 7034 7899         Email: michaellawlor@atwoodtate.co.uk

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The Bookshop Band

Last night a few of us went along to Daunt Books in Marylebone to check out the highly praised duo The Bookshop Band. They were fabulous! Sipping white wine, sitting in a beautiful bookshop and listening to enchanting music inspired by the books surrounding us – I can hardly think of a better way to spend a Thursday evening.

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The band are touring bookshops and other venues now so check out their tour dates and get yourselves along to see them! Check out some of their videos here: https://vimeo.com/thebookshopband 

 

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#iinmarketing2016

A few weeks ago I went to the B2B Marketing Conference hosted by the Industry Information Network (IIN). It was a day packed full of insights and guidance for B2B publishers and media companies and there were a host of great speakers from the industry who really know their stuff!

Topics covered by the speakers included:
– Social media and content marketing
– Account-Based Marketing (ABM)
– Lead generation approaches
– Email marketing
– Marketing automation

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There were also two round table sessions and the first one I joined was a discussion of how marketing and sales teams can work closer to drive revenue growth. As a recruiter who sources candidates for both these types of roles, it was really interesting to hear how companies bring about interaction between sales and marketing staff as well as what approaches work and what don’t!

The second round table was about B2B email marketing best practices. Once again it was great to find out what success B2B publishers and media companies have with this and ways we can all improve our marketing emails. Brexit was of course a point of discussion and a lot of delegates had concerns about how the new EU Data Reforms coming into force in 2018 will affect their usable data.

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The day finished up with a panel discussion about the challenges facing B2B marketers and how they can be overcome. It seems both large and small companies have similar problems to resolve and a lot of the suggestions for overcoming these and improving marketing strategy can be implemented on a small scale and at a low cost.

Thanks Patrick Angell and Naomi Hoad for organising the day!

Learn more about the IIN and their events here: www.iineurope.net/

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Consultant in the Hot Seat – Christina Dimitriadi

CD blog photo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What book are you reading at the moment and what do you think of it?

The Stress of Her Regard by Tim Powers. It’s not a book I would easily pick up and I am not a fan of English romantic literature so when I saw the names of Lord Byron, Keats, and Shelley as the main characters I was a bit put off. It did take me a while to get into it but when I did, I was very pleasantly surprised. Powers sets a very interesting mood which is at times like reading someone else’s dream where you feel that there are moments of haze and you are not sure about what’s happening, while at other times things are bright and clear. It’s a very unusual vampire story in which the author has combined historical facts with traditional myths with folklore and fiction. It’s not consistent in pace so it can at times be a bit slow and then suddenly spur into action. This book does have some great action and gruesome terror and it builds up well towards the ending so I’m very happy I stuck with it!

What three books changed your life?

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis. This probably has to do with the fact that when I was young I discovered this book in a small cupboard into which I had been trying to get for quite some time. One day I found the key and finally opened what turned out to be my mother’s book collection from when she was herself a child. I grabbed the most tattered book I could find and started reading it, and I did not put it down. This was the first time that I realised that reading a good book was one of the best pastimes.

Lords and Ladies by Terry Pratchett. It took me exactly three pages to fall in love with Pratchett’s style and writing. I finished the book in a few days and ran to the bookstore for more. Having now read all of the Discworld novels, Lord and Ladies is still one of my favourites. It’s a very balanced book between light and fun and darkness with a very tight and capturing plot. This was the best random book choice I’ve ever made and I would definitely recommend it. No matter what I’m currently reading, I always have a TP book open by the side of my bed. Revisiting the Discworld time and time again is like going to see an old friend.

I can’t think of a third one!

What’s on your birthday wish list?

Books, books and more books! I’m getting back to my passion for cooking and my dream of one day having a very attractive cooking library. So I’ve decided to try my hand at one of the most challenging cuisines; Persian and Middle-Eastern. Top of my list is Persianna by Sabrina Ghayour with food and flavours from the regions near the Southern and Eastern shores of the Mediterranean Sea. And to compliment that with something sweet, my second choice is The Baking Book from Honey and Co and their mouth-watering recipes from their restaurant in Fitzrovia, London – which is also top on my to-visit list.

What has been the highlight/s of the past year?

Leaving Athens (and 365 days of sun behind) to move to London. Shortly afterwards I started working with Atwood Tate which has been a lovely experience so far. I feel I am part of a small and supportive family in a very active and productive environment. I couldn’t have imagined a better place to be in for my first job in the UK.

True Fact: I never travel without a Terry Pratchett Book!

To find out more about the roles each of our consultants covers, go to the “Meet the Team” page.

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BAME in Publishing

Sarah Shaffi, online editor and producer at The Bookseller, and Wei Ming Kam, sales and marketing assistant at Oberon Books, have recently set up the BAME in Publishing network “in response to the endless diversity debates and panels that have come and gone in the last few years”. The following blog is from Sarah, giving a bit more of the background behind the network and some next steps we can all take to improve things for everyone in the industry.

BAME in Publishing - correct
sarah shaffi
Let me tell you a story.

I was at a book launch and was introduced to a man working for the publishing company which had released the book in question. We’d not met before but within seconds this man, let’s call him Colin (not his name), said that we had. I told him we hadn’t.

He then named a very specific occasion on which we’d met. Impossible, I said, I wasn’t at that event.

Ah, of course, Colin countered, he’d met me at this other event, he said, naming a place and rough date. Nope, not me either, I said, with frustration probably suffusing my voice.

Luckily he stopped, because I was this close *holds thumb and forefinger apart just enough to slide a piece of paper in between* to snapping at him that he was clearly mixing me up with some other brown girl he’d met at a publishing event.

My story isn’t unusual. Ask any person from a Black, Asian or majority ethnic background in publishing if they’ve ever been mistaken for someone else because of their skin colour, and I guarantee most of them have similar stories to mine.

Which is one of the many reasons it’s time to make sure publishing diversifies its workforce. It’s a selfish reason, but I’d like there to be more brown girls in publishing so the six of us here already (OK, maybe a few more than six) don’t keep getting mistaken for each other.

But on a more serious note, publishing should recruit more people from ethnically diverse backgrounds (and economically and geographically diverse backgrounds) because it will be a good thing for the industry. Why? It kind of boils down to one thing…

The wider the backgrounds of the people working in publishing, the more likely publishers are to come up with new ideas and new books and see new voices. And this means that publishers can reach wider audiences, sell more books, and make more money.

Helping to increase the number of people from BAME backgrounds in publishing, and then hopefully the number of books by BAME people published in the UK, is behind why me and Wei Ming Kam set up BAME in Publishing.

The group, which is for people already in the industry and those aspiring to work in publishing, is a positive, fun space for BAME people, but also a safe one, where people can share experiences, get advice, and make connections and find mentors. It’s time to turn the discussion around diversity in publishing from one where we moan about how terrible it all is to one where we celebrate the BAME talent already in the industry, support them, and make sure they’re visible, to the industry itself and to those wanting to join.

For people from ethnic minority backgrounds wanting to come into publishing, I have the following tips:

  • Don’t be afraid. I know it can seem daunting to be one of the only non-white faces around, but you’re paving the way for future generations, and you should always remember that.
  • Speak up. One of the valuable things about you is that you might look at the world from a slightly different perspective, so if you have an idea or an opinion, share it. (Politely and in an appropriate setting, of course.)
  • Go for paid positions. There are a number of paid internships out there, so make sure you apply for them. Work experience is fine, but working for free should only be done for a week or two absolute maximum.
  • Make connections. Find people who have done the jobs you want to do, and drop them a line to say hello and ask if they would mind you asking their advice. It’s especially easy to do this with Twitter.
  • Join BAME in Publishing!

And for publishers, a few things you could be doing:

  • Look beyond Creative Access. Creative Access is brilliant, but one intern a year in your company probably isn’t going to change anything fast.
  • Reach out to schools. London is one of the most multicultural cities in the world, and so many UK publishing firms are based in the capital. It’s not difficult to find schools where the make-up of pupils is diverse, so go out there and talk to them, make sure they know the many different roles and opportunities available to them at a publishing house.
  • Pay. I can’t say this enough – publishers should be paying interns and, if possible, should at least be shouting travel expenses for work experience students.
  • Widen the advertising net. Sure, The Guardian and your own website are great, but are you making an effort to reach new audiences with your job adverts? Are you advertising on Twitter and Tumblr, in publications targeting people of different ethnic backgrounds?

My hope is that, if we all work together, BAME in Publishing will no longer need to exist, and I’ll never be mistaken for that other brown girl in publishing again.

Want to find out more? Go to BAMEinpublishing.tumblr.com/faqs, email bameinpublishing@gmail.com, or leave a comment below.

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