Author Archives: Karine Nicpon

About Karine Nicpon

After completing her MA in Publishing and an extensive intern experience in trade publishing, Karine spent a few years as an Editorial and Legal Assistant at Editions Points in Paris. She was also in charge of the editorial committee and of all the negotiations with foreign publishers and agents. Thanks to this previous experience, she has a solid knowledge of the publishing industry and understands the needs of both clients and candidates. Karine joined Atwood Tate in September 2013 and looks after Editorial (Business Information, STM and Societies), Production, Production Editorial, Design, Digital and Operations (from graduates to mid-management) in London, the Home Counties and East Anglia.

B2B Job Focus: Market Reporters

Do you remember our article about B2B reporters? Today we will look at a specific category of journalists: Market Reporters!

Market Reporters

Market reporters (or Pricing/Price Reporters) are journalists with distinct duties. They assess commodities prices and write market commentaries and news on specific markets.

Commodities are substances or products that can be traded. Single commodities markets include metals (gold, zinc, steel), energy (fuel oil, natural gas) or agriculture (rice, wheat, corn).

Market reporters talk to trader and investors to establish a list of prices, either on a daily or weekly basis. They also need to develop solid relationship with commodity analysts, forecasters, financial planners and company CEOs and expand and maintain this network.

Investors rely on market reporters for information about what to buy, sell or hold. As their analysis has an impact on the stock market, these journalists can be influential. They need a great deal of diplomacy as well as resilience and communication skills.

Typical duties

Market reporters are expected to:

  • Develop an expertise of their industry, build strong contacts within it and attend relevant conferences, meeting and events
  • Assess prices and write commentaries and news about the industry
  • Interview professionals and travel when required to attend meetings
  • Keep up to date and report on foreign markets
  • Have a good head for numbers and be meticulous with the data they collect

Background

Our clients are open to graduates with the following degrees:

  • Journalism
  • Finance
  • Business
  • Economics.

Of course, employers will expect you to have excellent writing and numerical skills. For senior positions, a relevant track record in the industry is necessary.

This article was the last of our series on B2B Job Focus, we hope you enjoyed it!

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B2B Job Focus: Sub-Editors

In a previous post, we described different career paths available to B2B reporters. In this article, we explore the significant part played by sub-editors/copy-editors in the editing process!

Sub-editors / Copy-editors

Sub-editors who work for newspapers and magazines are often called copy-editors (or subs). Their role is to process the copy that will appear in their publication. They must ensure that it is accurate, free of mistakes, makes sense and reads well.

Sub-editors often sit in/next to the production team. They do not write articles, but they edit the work of others to “house-style” and adhere to word counts. They also write headlines, standfirsts, captions and summaries. Their duties may include laying out pages too.

Typical tasks

  • correcting spelling or grammar/typographical errors
  • writing headlines, abstracts and captions
  • checking the article’s accuracy and spotting potential legal problems
  • cutting or editing copy to fit on the page
  • liaising with reporters and editors
  • laying out pages

Sub-editors need to be meticulous and ready to edit heavily if necessary. They are more often than not the crafty hands turning articles into compelling stories. They need to be very organised and able to work to tight deadlines.

Many sub-editors trained as journalists before moving on to this position. Unfortunately a lot of publishers outsourced their sub-editing/production function in the last decade and journalists and editors often have to fill in for sub-editors as they don’t have the in-house staff required. And the line is sometimes very thin between these positions.

Career Path

The National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ), the National Union of Journalists (NUJ), the Society of Editors and the Publishing Training Centre offer preliminary accredited qualifications or copy-editing courses by distance learning. Graduates with relevant qualifications, such as a degree in English, media or publishing are also considered. The career path for a sub-editor includes being promoted to senior and potentially chief sub-editor or production editor. Their main role is to supervise a team of sub-editors and oversee the whole production process, making sure the magazine is delivered on time and to schedule.

Next week, we will be entering the fascinating world of Market Reporters!

Is our career advice helping you in your job search? Do let us know via our social media channels!

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B2B Job Focus: Deputy Editors/Editors

Are you a section editor who wants to climb up the career ladder? Today we’ll introduce you to Deputy Editors & Editors!

Deputy Editors/Editors

Deputy Editors are second-in-command within the publication. When the Editor is away, the deputy Editor deputises for them.

Depending on the publication’s size and structure, the role of the Deputy Editor may vary: you can have the same duties as a section Editor’s or assist Editors with their workload. Deputy Editors are usually less involved in hands-on writing and focus more on editing the work of other journalists, assisting the Editor with workflow management and mentoring/managing more junior members of staff. On top of solid writing skills, you will need excellent communication and organisation skills.

Here is a summary of what the role typically involves:

  • Edit and proofread the work of writers
  • Manage and assign articles (and sometimes write them)
  • Oversee the publication’s content to maintain quality and accuracy
  • Organise copy editing and production processes
  • Mentor or manage junior members of the team

Some publications may use the job title Assistant Editor instead, while other companies both have a deputy Editor and an assistant Editor. Assistant Editors’ main duty is to support the Editor, sometimes by performing a similar role as a section Editor. It’s confusing, we know!

Most deputy Editors have a solid background as a Reporter/Senior Reporter with a keen interest in the editing process. A degree in journalism or in a subject related to the publication (for example, a law degree to work for a law publication) can also be an asset. The next step for a deputy Editor is to become Editor!

Editors

Editors are responsible for the publication’s smooth delivery and more importantly for its Editorial strategy and commercial success. They need to ensure that the content published is accurate and compelling as well as meeting the audience’s needs. Editors act as the face of the publication, and as a result they may be required to attend events and conferences related to their industry. They need to be commercially aware and keeping up-to-date with market trends. They might also be involved in the launch or development of events associated to their publication as events now represent a large part of some publishers’ revenues.

Editors are expected to:

  • Plan, coordinate and revise content for publication
  • Manage Editorial workflow and monitor the printing process to ensure deadlines are met
  • Establish and monitor budgets
  • Be aware of market trends and identify new opportunities for new products
  • Review story ideas and suggest new ones
  • Act as the main point of contact between Editorial team and other departments
  • Work with sales and marketing teams to raise brand awareness
  • Work with events team to develop/launch new events or provide events content
  • Attend industry events and chair panels
  • Manage and develop Editorial team, recruiting staff and conducting appraisals

Editors’ responsibilities can be very broad especially if you are working on a small publication. Editors work closely with the sales, marketing and production teams as well as writers to produce a quality publication.

As we mentioned before, job titles vary enormously from a company to another. A step up from Editor would be Managing Editor and/or Editor-in-Chief.

Extensive experience is usually necessary to become an Editor, as we explained in our previous articles on B2B journalism and Section Editors. So if you are an ambitious graduate, you’ll have to get some relevant experience before applying for such a position!

Is our career advice helping you in your job search? Do let us know via our social media channels!

 

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B2B Job Focus: Section Editors

Thinking of a career in B2B journalism? Atwood Tate is here to help! In a previous post we introduced you to the wonderful world of B2B publishing. Let’s continue our closer look at the different editorial career paths of B2B publishing with Section Editors!

Section Editors

 

Becoming a section editor is one of the career paths available to reporters/senior reporters interested in editing or getting some managerial experience. Section Editors can focus on a particular type of content like news or features. They could also specialise in a particular topic such as fashion, games or technology.

Section editors are responsible for overseeing the content of their part of the publication. They commission articles for their sections and work independently with their team of journalists (if the publication is big enough for them to have a team). They ensure that their section is of quality, up-to-date with the industry’s latest developments, and informative.

The duties associated with this role include:

  • scheduling content for their section of the magazine/website commissioning/writing articles
  • supervising freelance writers to ensure they hit deadlines and potentially managing in-house reporters.
  • editing, proofreading and subbing copy

Section editors may write some content for the publication but their main duty is to supervise writers and guarantee that deadlines and quality standards are met.

Our clients expect candidates to have solid experience as senior reporters to apply for a section editor position. They are looking for reporters with good proofreading and subbing skills as well as the ability to manage a team and to plan content for the section of the magazine.

The natural progression for section editors is to move on to a deputy editor position and then an editor role. No specific qualification is required to become a section editor but a journalism degree can be a bonus as previously stated in our Reporter focus.

Next week, we will be looking at the typical job description and career path for a Digital/Online/Web Editor position!

Is our career advice helping you in your job search? Do let us know via our social media channels!

Inspired by the different careers in B2B publishing and thinking about new opportunities? We are running a contest to receive a personalised CV surgery session with Karine, our Lead B2B Consultant, to make sure you are the best applicant you can be! Apply here between midnight 20th August and 11.59pm 2nd September to secure your chance!

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What happens to my CV?

Introduction

If you’ve never worked with a recruitment agency, it might be difficult to know what the different stages actually mean. Does registering with us automatically mean you’ve applied for a job? How will I know what the details are? Lead Recruitment Consultant Karine Nicpon explains.

Applying for role via a job board (Guardian/Gorkana/Bookseller) or via our website

Applying through a job board or through our website doesn’t send your application directly to the client. Instead, it is reviewed for suitability by the consultant, based on a full client brief (required skills, experience and salary expectations.)

If we think you are suitable, we send full details: name and website of the client, job description, salary, and any other relevant information. This is when you can decide how interested you are.

If everything still looks rosy, great! It’s time to send us a tailored CV and cover letter for us to send to the client. The process to your shiny new job begins!

Unfortunately, if we don’t think your skills and experience match what the client is expecting, we won’t proceed with your application. The client hasn’t seen your CV, as we only send over a personalised application with your permission. If you haven’t heard from us, you are welcome to apply for other jobs that we may have available or request to be added to our database for future opportunities.

Registering with us via our website/E-mailing us your CV

When you send us your CV by e-mail, one of our administrators reviews it for relevant experience. If we can help, we invite you in for a registration meeting. If there isn’t enough relevant experience, we have a range of temp and freelance roles to build up your experience. Many temps move into permanent roles, so don’t be disheartened! If your CV is strong but not publishing focused, we send you a reply acknowledging your experience.

Registering your CV via our website is similar: fill in a form with your preferences, which is reviewed against current vacancies to see if we can help. If we can, we invite you in for a registration meeting to discuss your needs and start the job search process!

If we can’t help you, we will let you know so you aren’t left hanging.

Automatic job alerts

Once we have added you to our database, we activate your job alerts (unless you tell us not to!). These are instant alerts to our new vacancies so that you are always aware of the jobs we have. While these come up with a consultant’s email address, they are sent by our IT system based on your preferences, not by the consultants themselves. Receiving a job alert is not a guarantee that your application will be progressed!

If you don’t like the sound of a job you can delete it but, if you do, you can apply via our website for your CV to be reviewed by our consultants. One thing to remember: our alerts are not matched by salary, so please don’t be alarmed or offended if you receive something that seems too high or low for your experience! If you feel you are receiving too many alerts, you can ask to switch them off or edit your preferences directly by logging into your profile.

Contacting the team

Our team are always happy to hear from new and existing candidates. If you would like to get in touch, there are a few options:

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Industry Spotlight: B2B

Welcome to Atwood Tate’s industry spotlight series, where we go behind the scenes of each of our recruitment desks to give you the scoop on working with Atwood Tate. Our next entry is with our  fantastic B2B desk, manned by Karine Nicpon and Julie Irigaray.  Karine and Julie help match B2B clients and candidates across the country, with a variety of roles across a range of business sectors.

What is B2B publishing?

B2B or business-to-business publications are industry focussed and aimed at people in work. They are also called ‘professional’ or ‘trade’ journals (which are different from academic journals, don’t get confused!). An example would be The Bookseller or InPublishing: both are B2B magazines aimed at the publishing industry. There are as many B2B publishing sectors as there are job industries. You will find business publications for lawyers and finance professionals, but also construction workers, nurses, farmers, the list goes on. B2B readerships can be ‘vertical’ (publication is aimed at a specific industry, such as lawyers) or ‘horizontal’ (the audience is spread over many industries, such as PAs). These titles can be weekly, fortnightly, monthly, quarterly etc. in print and/or digital. A lot of B2B publishers also run conferences and events aimed at the industries they cover. Some publishing groups publish both B2B and B2C magazines.

What is the difference between a B2B and a B2C publication?

B2B is aimed at people in a professional capacity whilst B2C publications are consumer magazines made to entertain/inform in a more general capacity (such as fashion magazines or TV listings) or consumer specialist titles about a special interest/hobby (e.g. music, cookery, photography). We need to differentiate these two sectors from customer publishers/content marketing agencies who produce content aimed at customers on behalf of a specific company. Examples include free inflight magazines or supermarket magazines. Some customer publishers have become more specialised and produce print and digital content on behalf of businesses, charities, educational or professional bodies, who might not have an in-house publishing team.

What publishing sectors does Atwood Tate cover?

Atwood Tate is a specialist publishing recruitment agency. We work with publishers across a number of sectors from consumer books (fiction/non-fiction), educational and academic publishing to STM (scientific, technical and medical) publishing.

On the magazine side of things, we mainly focus on B2B publishing and events and also work with information providers. We sometimes do have vacancies across customer/contract publishing as some of our clients do both B2B and custom publishing. But we rarely represent consumer-only publishers, unless their publications are niche/specialist magazines, which we find have a lot of similarities with B2B publishing in terms of skills required to fit a role.

Does B2B publishing automatically mean finance or legal publishing?

Not at all! As mentioned above, B2B publishing can cover any industry. We very often do have roles in financial publishing but we also partner with clients producing content for retail or marketing professionals, GPs, lawyers, optometrists, etc. If you chose to work in B2B publishing, you could end up covering any subject; the possibilities are endless!

What roles can Atwood Tate help with in B2B publishing?

We recruit across all publishing functions from content creation (reporter, features writer, news editor, copy-editor/sub-editor, managing editor, etc.) to production (designer, production editor, production manager) and sales, events or marketing roles. We also have more specialised roles such as market/price reporters or data journalists. And we can even help with IT roles as we have an IT consultant! We recruit for permanent and contract or temp/freelance roles.

For more information about B2B publishing, feel free to contact Karine  at karinenicpon@atwoodtate.co.uk or Julie at JulieIrigaray@atwoodtate.co.uk. For B2B temp/freelance roles, please contact Kellie Millar  at kelliemillar@atwoodtate,co.uk

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PPA Independent Publisher Awards 2017

Speaker talking to audience in front of projection of PPA independent publisher conference 2017

Last month, we were delighted to be one of the sponsors of the PPA Independent Publisher Awards 2017. It was an exciting day and a great occasion to catch up with a lot of friendly contacts, clients and candidates, and the Independent Publisher Conference in the morning was as always full of talented speakers and valuable insights.

Jim Bilton, Managing Director at Wessenden Marketing, was the first to take the stage. He offered the audience a unique insight into the key industry trends in 2017, which has been a challenging year. He observed a massive drop in turnover and headcount growths (these figures were compiled from the benchmark Publishing Futures survey taken by 99 publishers). Key Industry Metrics graphThis has of course affected both our clients and candidates and confidence has reduced particularly in smaller publishers (only 44% are more confident than a year ago). B2B publishing, remarked Jim, is much more global and ad-driven than consumer publishing, and low print. Overall B2B has a solid profitability. Jim gave the audience valuable advice to overcome challenges and adapt to a changing media landscape, and he concluded on a positive note as 2018 should be a promising year with key indicators picking up.

Another crucial piece of information that morning was the session about the imminent GDPR. Simon Morissey, Partner at Lewis Silkin, talked us through users’ implied consent in online marketing. The GDPR will give users more control and choice over their data. This will be a challenge for the publishing industry but Simon pointed out that challenge creates opportunities. He also advised strongly that publishers start thinking about their marketing GDPR strategy now, not in May 2018 but now!

This enlightening morning was followed by the PPA Independent Publisher Awards. I was proud (and I confess a bit nervous!) to give away the award for Publisher of the Year. It was a great afternoon in very nice company. Congratulations again to all the winners of this year and thanks to the PPA for organising such a wonderful event! Bring on 2018.PPA Independent Publisher Awards winners

For more information about the PPA see their website here.

Karine Nicpon, Lead Consultant (B2B roles)

t: 020 7034 7905

e: karinenicpon@atwoodtate.co.uk

https://uk.linkedin.com/in/karine-nicpon

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PPA IPN Conference & Awards 2017

We’re very excited to be attending the PPA IPN Conference & Awards on 28th November – all the details about the day can be found here: http://www.ppa.co.uk/events/ipn2017

Karine and Kellie will be attending the morning conference which is always hugely informative with a great line up of talks including key industry trends, events, GDPR, developing subscriptions and media models of the future. We’re looking forward to the round table – we’ll be hosting the one focussed on Talent (we do know a thing or 2 about this!). 

Good luck to all the nominees – for a full list of the Awards and all those shortlisted check out: http://www.ppa.co.uk/en/Events/IPN2017/Awards We’re pleased to be sponsoring the award for Editor of the Year!

Here at Atwood Tate, we work closely with many independent publishers across a wide range of markets and sectors. Coming from publishing backgrounds ourselves, we understand the culture and ethos of all our clients – one of our favourite parts of the job is getting to know people and building lasting relationships. That and of course working with our candidates to help them find the right job and develop their careers.

We hope to see you at the conference and awards and do get in touch if you have any Talent / recruitment queries in the meantime.

#PPAIPA

Karine Nicpon, Lead Consultant

t: 020 7034 7905

e: karinenicpon@atwoodtate.co.uk

https://uk.linkedin.com/in/karine-nicpon

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How to Keep Your Skills Relevant – The Galley Club

how-to-keep-your-skills-relevant

Last week I was delighted to open the talk season at the Galley Club. They invited me to share my experience about changing skillset in publishing. I focussed on production skills but really we could apply the tips and advice below to any job in publishing. Here is a retranscription of what my presentation.

Before I start, let me tell you just a little bit about me: I studied Spanish and Publishing back in France and I worked in trade publishing in Paris for a few years. I was Editorial and Legal Assistant for a pocketbook publisher there. Three and a half years ago I moved to London because I wanted a life and career change. I’ve been working at Atwood Tate for three years now. At Atwood Tate we cover all kinds of roles at all levels across all publishing sectors, from academic to STM, B2B, trade or professional. For three years I’ve been working on production and production editorial roles, amongst others. So I will focus on changing skills set in publishing and more particularly in production, and will tell you how to keep your skills relevant and adapt to changing roles.

  • Context: changes in publishing and production

This is not breaking news, publishing has been through many changes over the years. Proof of that is the invasion of “metadata” and “content” in the headlines of conferences and seminars. Publishing has changed, whether it’s in STM, academic, professional or educational and of course trade as well, which had perhaps been a bit slower to adapt than many other sectors, in terms of innovation and digitisation of content. As I’m sure everyone is aware, sales of digital products, whether that be eBooks, online journals, databases or online platforms have grown considerably. And publishers developed new systems and workflows to enable their content to be published in various formats.

This obviously has affected all roles within publishing and the skills required to do those jobs. The same goes for the printing industry. In three years at Atwood Tate, I have seen a huge variety of new job titles, most including the word “digital”, but this has changed again actually, as digital is now entrenched in all that they do and it doesn’t need to always be highlighted.

In terms of production, we’ve seen a change in workflows and methodologies, with for example a move to xml first workflows. New products, formats and technologies means new systems being put in place, whether that be overhauling production workflows and peer-review processes or outsourcing the digital conversion of files to specialist suppliers. As a result we’ve noticed a demand for more project and programme managers, both on a permanent and fixed-term contract basis. Professionals need to be able to review and master workflows and processes.

Now don’t hate me, but there is also a lot of demand and opportunity for people with strong technical skills: knowledge of mark-up language such as html and xml is often required, as well as basic coding and analytics. Everybody should be comfortable reading and manipulating simple data. Because it’s all about data and metadata nowadays! And being able to deal with suppliers and control the quality of the data received. Highly technical roles are still relatively rare in publishing, because the majority of platforms and systems are being developed and built by external suppliers, but this could change, and larger publishers do already have teams of developers working on bespoke software in-house.

But there is a good news! Publishers are not just looking outside the industry for people with skills that are missing. When I joined Atwood Tate, I worked on Digital Producer or Video Producer roles and our clients were saying that they were open to hire people from outside of the industry, because they felt that existing publishing candidates lacked the experience and skills required. However I’m pleased to say that this has changed, and in the majority of cases, the online/digital aspects have been integrated into the traditional positions. Bringing new people in is good for diversity but often very techy people might not fit into the creative world of publishing. Now this brings me to my next point, how do you build up on your skills? How do you keep these relevant?

galley-club-image

Karine speaking at the Galley Club

  • Get to know your skills and your career options

Traditional skills are still key in publishing. The profile of production and production editorial people have not really changed. The “hard skills” used in production are still the same. Yes, you need to be able to deal with suppliers but it’s nothing a production controller is not used to be doing. You need to be a good project manager to master workflows? Well again this is a core skill of production people, organisation, time-management. You need to be able to work comfortably with data? Production professionals were always required to have a good head for numbers and a keen eye for detail. I realise I sound a bit like a job description but what I want to say is there is nothing unachievable here!

Before updating your skills though, I would advise to get to know them. Assess your experience and see what you’re good at, what you’re missing. You need to be able to identify a skill you don’t have by talking to colleagues and competitors. If you work in a very small company, maybe go to seminars to identify the latest trends in the market, talk to fellow production people. If you need advice on your options, talking to a recruiter is also a good idea. Recruiters will be able to tell you where there is a shortage of skills in the market and where you will have more opportunities. You can also have a look at some job adverts to identify the requirements of publishers.

It is important for you to be aware of your options. The days of keeping one job for life are long gone. And there are many different paths a production candidate can take, whether it’s managing a production team, or becoming a project manager. It could be working in Operations where production profiles are often required or managing relationships with suppliers. There are multiple careers available for production candidates. So ask yourself: what are you good at? What do you enjoy doing? Where do you want your career to go?

  • Keeping your skills updated

Now once you’ve identified which of your abilities and skills you would like to develop, how do you get there? How do you gain new skills and update your existing ones?

One way is obviously through training.

As I mentioned earlier, publishers do understand the importance of experience and publishing knowledge. And they are now training and reskilling people rather than bringing in new people for the sake of it. A lot of our candidates are sent on training courses or in-house workshops. There are several training organisations out there and hopefully your company will back you up. It’s worth having a look at the benefits of a publisher before accepting a new role there, to see if training is provided on a regular basis.

Publishers are making an effort to retain their staff and train them for different roles. A lot of our clients are encouraging people to move into different roles or even different departments within their organisation. It’s a massive benefit and in the long term can save on time and money. They would rather develop their employees than getting some new people on board who would require a lot more training and might not be the right fit in the end.  Some of our clients also organise shadowing days where you sit next to a colleague to try and familiarise yourself with a new way of working and new workflows. If you don’t think your employer is offering this, there is no harm in suggesting it yourself!

Attending classes and getting a professional certification can be useful too. I’m thinking of Prince 2 or Agile certification, for instance, which is sometimes required for Project Manager or Product Manager roles. And it’s always a bonus on your CV and a plus for your organisation. So again, do not hesitate to ask your line manager for training. If you can’t get backing from your company then there are free online courses like the MOOC (Massive Online Open Courses) offered by universities to help individuals to develop. Or affordable workshops and seminars you can go to. But you need to be ready to teach yourself new skills.

No matter how you chose to update your skills or what opportunities you are given, there is one thing you will always need, and it’s the right attitude.

  • The right attitude

Something that we hear HR and in-house recruiters say all the time is: you need to be adaptable. The industry changes constantly, roles don’t tend to stay the same, there are so many factors impacting your professional career, politics, economics, etc. So the one thing you need to develop is your adaptability. Be curious and resilient. Be flexible. Don’t be put off by change, embrace it! It’s not always an easy thing to do. Some people are open to change naturally and actually really like it, for some others it’s more difficult to adapt. But if you want to evolve with the industry, you have to be flexible. The pace is fast. If you can’t demonstrate your willingness to move with the times, to upskill and learn new tech, understand new business models, then you won’t keep up. Your experience and the skills you already have are gold for publishers. But you need to be eager to learn more every day.

It’s not easy for everyone. It was certainly not easy for me. When I came to London, I knew nothing about recruitment. I had worked in publishing, I knew the industry quite well, yes. But recruitment doesn’t exist in France. So when I got hired at Atwood Tate, I had everything to learn. And I was really eager. I moved to London because I had in mind that things are different in England and that transferrable sills are actually a thing. And they are! In France it’s very difficult to move to another industry, if you studied Spanish, then you can be a Spanish teacher, or live in Spain, but that’s pretty much it! In England I do really think that we have the chance to move to different roles using these so called transferrable skills.

Of course I received a lot of training at Atwood Tate. And I keep getting training every step of the way, because if the publishing industry is changing, my job is changing too. And it’s all about keeping up-to-date and adapting to the market really. When I started three years ago, we didn’t need to dig out candidates, we had plenty of applications for our roles. It’s very different now. The market is very fast-paced and we constantly need to head hunt some candidates for some roles like Junior Production Controller for example which is a level where it’s really difficult to find people. So we have had to adapt too. Claire sends us on courses and we go to seminars, we talk to our candidates, our clients, we listen and we try to evolve. Some of us took a recruitment qualification recently. I’m not a person who loves change. But I had to learn to be more flexible and to be fair, I’ve only be more successful since then. More confident as well as I have developed a lot more skills than I thought I had.

 

To sum up I would say that you need a positive attitude and an open-mind to keep on top of things. More than a skillset, it’s a mind-set. You need to take ownership of their careers and be proactive. Jobs are changing and so is the industry, but it’s really up to you to keep learning and be open to trying new things.

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BIC Seminar: New Trends in Publishing (part 2)

As promised last week, we’ll focus this time on the impact that New Trends in Publishing (#bicnewtrends @BIC1UK)  can have on production departments and suppliers such as printers. Mike Levaggi is Group Production Director at HarperCollins and he came to the BIC Seminar to tell us a bit more about the digital print revolution.

Publishing is changing, I think we’re all aware of that. There is an increasing number of titles and a decreasing run length: publishers tend to print short runs to adapt to their business model.

Slide 3

© Mike Levaggi & HarperCollins

E-books and e-readers create extensive back lists and encourage print on demand. In this context, digital print is growing rapidly and is replacing offset printing. Print on demand requires publishers to move fast: you don’t print a book unless there is an order for it (“book of one”, down to one copy). The same way short print runs have increased changeover time and put pressure on conventional printing. Print runs are getting shorter and smaller orders are driving administrative issues for both printer and publisher which changes the workflows in production departments.

Slide 4

© Mike Levaggi & HarperCollins

To face these changes, printers and manufacturers are tooling up, investing in a range of digital technologies to be able to print faster and shorter at a better cost. Inkjet quality is improving, as well as costs. Equipment suppliers work on higher resolution.

Digital printing is a lot faster, it increases flexibility and minimises turnaround times. Digital accelerates cash-flows.

© Mike Levaggi & HarperCollins

© Mike Levaggi & HarperCollins

What’s next? Mike has been talking to a lot of publishing professionals, printers and suppliers and according to them, the industry is facing the biggest change since print moved from film to computer. The technology will continue to improve, driving cost and quality benefits. More titles will be kept available without increasing inventory. Workflows will develop rapidly in all parts of the supply chain. And the pace of change is going to be increased.

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