Category Archives: Advice

Interview, CV, Job Seeking Advice.

Tips for Video Interview Success

Video interviews are becoming increasingly popular. They may take two forms: they may be conducted via Skype or a similar platform, where you talk in real-time to an interviewer, or they may involve recording answers to pre-set questions without the presence of an interviewer. The former is similar to a face-to-face interview, although there are a few things you should watch out for. The latter may feel more unnatural if you haven’t done one before, but remember everyone is in the same boat and there is nothing to worry about!

Our Top Tips for Success in your Video Interview

  • Make sure you won’t be interrupted. Remember that video interview on the BBC that went viral when the interviewees children came bursting into the background? Interviewers will probably understand if something like that happens, but it’s likely to throw you off your game! Make sure your children, pets, roommates etc. are aware of what you’re doing and are kept out of the room. You don’t want your cat walking all over your keyboard in the middle of the interview!
  • Use a plain background – a plain wall is ideal. You don’t want the interviewer to be distracted by the stack of laundry in the background or your unusual taste in posters.
  • If it’s a Skype interview, make sure you check your webcam and microphone are working well before your scheduled interview time. Call a friend or family member to check, and to help calm your nerves.
  • If you have to record your answers, make sure you practice and listen to yourself back a couple of times. Without the presence of an interviewer, it’s easy to feel awkward and that can come across in the recording. Practising will help you feel more natural.
  • Dress smartly – as you would for a face-to-face interview – and not just on the top half. You’ll feel more in the interview ‘zone’ as well as coming across more professional.
  • Look at the camera, not yourself. This will give an appearance of eye contact, otherwise you’ll appear to be looking down.
  • Relax – you’ve got this!

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CV Tips – Do’s and Don’ts

Working in recruitment, we look at a LOT of CVs. One thing that can help or hinder a candidate is how they’ve laid out their CV – we try to look past the structure to the content, but this is made MUCH easier when the information is presented clearly and logically. It’s not about fancy designs (unless you are applying for design roles), but a well-structured CV demonstrates your written communication skills, which are essential in any publishing job.

Do

DO clearly set out the dates (month and year) you worked at any position.

e.g. November 2015 – October 2017        Atwood Publishing          Sales Assistant

DO use concrete figures and examples to back up your achievements. Statistics sound impressive!

DO use bullet points which list your responsibilities and accomplishments in each previous role.

DO include a brief ‘Profile’ at the top of your CV. This is optional, but can give you an opportunity to highlight your most relevant skills and experience for the job. It should be tailored to each role you apply for. Do NOT exceed a couple of sentences.

DO save your document as a Word or PDF document and name it something like ‘Jane Bloggs CV’.

DO specify the relevant IT programmes or programming languages you are competent in under your ‘Skills’ section – InDesign, Microsoft Office, WordPress, HTML etc. Also mention if you can speak any foreign languages.

DO maintain a professional style. You can include details of your interests to make it personal; however, a CV shouldn’t be in an informal or ‘chatty’ style.

DO list your education and employment in reverse chronological order. However, if your most relevant experience is not your most recent, you may want to do a separate ‘Relevant Experience’ section above your ‘Recent Employment’ section.

DO provide a link to your LinkedIn profile, and if it’s relevant (such as for publicity roles) your Twitter handle or blog URL.

Don’t

DON’T write long paragraphs. It makes the relevant information harder to find and a Hiring Manager might miss something important.

DON’T go over two sides of A4. You need to demonstrate you can prioritise relevant information.

DON’T include a picture, date of birth or details of your marital status.

DON’T write ‘Curriculum Vitae’ at the top. It’s a waste of space as the hiring manager already knows what they’re looking at, so just put your full name.

DON’T list all your GCSEs or O-Levels, as it takes up too much space. It’s fine to put ‘3 x A grades, 6 x B grades, 1 x C grade, including English and Maths at grade B.’

DON’T include details of every module you took for your degree, but only include something if it’s relevant for the role you want.

DON’T mention anything political or controversial.

Other Resources

See our suggested CV layout here! You can also find more resources on our advice page.

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Q&A Round Up

Last week was the Publishers Association’s #workinpublishing week! We did a Q&A on Twitter – if you missed it, you can catch up here.

Q: What are the key features recruiters look for in a CV and Cover Letter when recruiting for entry level publishing jobs?

A: Office/admin experience is useful across the board, as are work experience, internships or temp roles in publishing houses! A well written, clear and concise cover letter will also get you a long way.

Q: How important do you think events like literary events and trade shows are?

A: Getting to know people at industry events can be really useful, especially as you can get a feel for different roles and sectors! Having said that, it’s not compulsory, so if you don’t live in London and you can’t get to events easily, don’t worry!

Q: When considering a job offer, it’s not just about salary. What else should candidates be thinking about?

A: Consider what’s important to you – the commute time, flexible working opportunities, training/professional development and company benefits!

Q: What are the most desirable additional tools to have experience in?

A: It depends on the role! But skills like InDesign, social media, general admin/database experience are useful for a lot of publishing work.

Q: I have a lot of volunteer experience with indie pubs, and I’m starting to look for my first publishing job. What would you say my next step should be?

A: Sounds like you should start applying for entry-level roles! You’d also be a great temping candidate, which can sometimes lead to long term roles.

Q: how can I make myself stand out from the hundreds of other graduates when applying for jobs?

A: Make your cover letter stand out by talking about your work experience, any temp roles, admin experience, and extracurricular interests which give you transferable skills!

Q: Are entry level publishing roles hard to come by? I feel like I haven’t seen many around since I graduated.

A: Entry-level roles are VERY competitive so get filled quickly, but a great way to get your foot in the door is through temping! Register with us for temping opportunities and we may be able to help.

Q: What are the most in demand roles in publishing?

A: Most people want to work in editorial, but publishers are always looking for Commissioning Editors and Production Controllers!

Q: What are your top tips for writing a good CV?

A: Be clear and concise, use bullet points, and put most relevant experience at the top! No long paragraphs please! For more tips see our blog post here.

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BAME in Publishing: One Year On

We are very pleased to bring you a guest post from Sarah Shaffi and Wei Ming Kam, founders of BAME in Publishing, a group which aims to support and encourage people from Black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds in the publishing industry.

Last year, they wrote a blog post for us about why they set up the group and provided some advice for working in the industry, which you can read here.

One year on, they reflect on their experiences of the group, and if anything has changed:

Five things we’ve learnt in a year of BAME in Publishing…

A year ago we set up BAME in Publishing – a networking group for people from black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds working in publishing, or wanting to break into the industry. Here are five things we’ve learnt from running the group.

  • BAME in Publishing fills a gap

When we set up the group, we weren’t sure if anyone was going to be interested, but even a year later we’re still getting new members, and all our meetings are full. It’s shown us that there is a real thirst for a group and a space when BAME people can form relationships, get career advice, and feel like they belong.

  • Don’t be afraid to ask for help/favours

We’ve turned to a lot of different people for help with various things and have been surprised how many want to support us in any way they can. We’ve been offered venues to host meet ups from publishers and bookshops, and it’s been heartening to know that much of the industry supports the work we do.

  • There are BAME people in the industry

Sometimes it feels like there are hardly any people from BAME backgrounds working in publishing, but running BAME in Publishing we’ve seen that this isn’t true. Our members come from all kinds of companies – big, small, trade, academic, publishers, agencies and so one. BAME talent is out there, which is encouraging, however…

  • There is a long way to go

It’s clear from our membership that a lot of the BAME talent are in junior positions. There are definitely some great senior role models out there (Ailah Ahmed from Virago, Natalie Jerome and Perminder Mann at Kings Road Publishing to name a few), but more needs to be done to make sure junior staff rise up the ranks quickly so that they can affect real change when it comes to the ethnic diversity of the industry. However, we do think that…

  • The future is bright

One thing we see at meeting after meeting is that there are so many talented people coming into publishing who want to make a difference, publish brilliant books, and be the leaders of tomorrow. We have no doubt that today’s bright young things will be heading up tomorrow’s publishing houses.

Wei Ming Kam and Sarah Shaffi at the BAME in Publishing 1st Birthday Party

Sarah Shaffi is online editor and producer at The Bookseller and tweets @sarahshaffi . Wei Ming Kam is sales and marketing executive at Oberon Books and tweets @weimingkam.

For more on BAME in Publishing, visit bameinpublishing.tumblr.com. You can also check out the #BAMEinPublishing hashtag on twitter and follow them on Instagram.

The group meets regularly, mostly in Central London. If you are interested in joining, please email bameinpublishing@gmail.com with your full name, email address, company you work for and your position (if applicable).

BAME in Publishing has been shortlisted for the #HClub100. Vote for them here!

 

 

Atwood Tate Limited embraces diversity and aims to promote the benefits of diversity in all of our business activities. For more information visit our policies page https://www.atwoodtatepublishingjobs.co.uk/policies/

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Filling the Gap – An Increase in Temp Hire

Recently, the REC released the results of a Jobs Outlook research study that indicated employers were predicting a greater reliance on temporary workers in the near future due to a shortage of skills. It showed that 20% of UK employers planned to increase agency workers in the medium term.

The likely reason for this is that temp workers allow a certain level of flexibility for employers and can help with the skills gap. It is also beneficial to workers who are looking to avoid long-term commitments. While temporary or contract roles might seem to lack stability or job security, we have found that many of our candidates prefer these types of roles as it enables them to quickly develop skills and move on into new and challenging environments. A quarter (24 per cent) transfer at least half of their temporary workers to permanent positions each year. We’ve seen this ourselves first-hand as many of our temps have been made permanent, due to their hard work and dedication. It goes to show what making the right impression can do!

The research also indicated that the attitudes of larger companies around temporary workers have also changed and there is a marked increase in employers planning to increase these numbers in the short-term.

Here at Atwood Tate, there’s no fear about a shortage of skills! Our desk is dedicated to sourcing temporary workers and our track record of placing candidates in a variety of short-term and contract roles gives us the confidence to know we can provide much needed support to clients during this period.

Many of our clients have come to us to recruit interim support (urgent, fast and speedy placements – reliable temps with the required skill set and attitude). While it may seem like a period of uncertainty, we see it as more of an opportunity for both employers and employees to ‘try each other out’.

So, if you are looking for temporary workers, do get in touch. And if you are a candidate who has been considering a job change but were nervous about the current market, just give us a call and we can let you know about some of the opportunities that are currently out there. Remember, it doesn’t always have to be permanent to be the right choice for you. There are often no interviews and the hiring process can happen so quickly, you can often find yourself working the very next day!

If you are interested in temping with Atwood Tate or are looking for interim support, please get in touch with:

Kellie Millar

kelliemillar@atwoodtate.co.uk

02070347897

Alison Redfearn

alisonredfearn@atwoodtate.co.uk

02070347922

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Publishing and the unpaid internship

A recent article in the Bookseller covered the attitudes changing around the unpaid internship. For some time now, there has been a building frustration with how impenetrable the publishing industry can be to people who cannot afford to undergo the necessary work placements that make finding one’s first job that much more viable.

Those already in publishing have recognised this roadblock and are making significant steps to facilitate entry into the industry for those candidates who may have considered it an impossible option previously. Paid internships are slowly but surely becoming a feature of some of the larger publishers, who have determined to increase diversity through any and all means. It is certainly a cause for celebration for a lot of recent graduates but also for anyone who has hoped to make the move into publishing from another industry but could never forgo a regular income, even for a short period of time.

Atwood Tate’s temp’s team have helped a number of graduates unable to work unpaid, get their first paid job in publishing. Publishers are always looking for support staff with some office and administration experience, and contact the Atwood Tate temps team often with urgent, start next day roles.

Candidates that do not have a traditional background in publishing also have found their way into the industry through our desk and it is a great source of pride to us that we are able to provide the underdog with a much-needed chance to live their dream.

We do also help interns to build on the experience they have gained and get paid roles. We act as another lever into the industry and our clients come to us when they need help managing a volume of roles or need temp staff quickly.

So, while the industry slowly brings about the necessary changes to internships, Atwood Tate is here to lend a hand. Get in touch, send your CV. We’re here to advise you, and answer questions about salary, job types, the different sectors, feel to pick our brains and see if we can help you get your foot on the publishing ladder!

Our contact details are below and we look forward to hearing from you!

Kellie Millar                                                              Alison Redfearn

0207034787                                                             02070347922

kelliemillar@atwoodtate.co.uk                            alisonredfearn@atwoodtate.co.uk

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Advertising Salary on Publishing Roles

Advertising Salary on Publishing Roles

Recently, there has been some discussion online about a lack of transparency in publishing recruitment in regards to agencies (and publishers) not disclosing the salaries on job adverts.

‘Available on request’?

At Atwood Tate, we disclose salary information on advertisements where we are permitted, but much of the time our clients ask us to keep this information confidential until point of enquiry.  There are a variety of reasons why employers wish to keep salary confidential or as “available on application”.  It can be because they wish to remain flexible or to maintain confidentiality across the company.  Other employees who are in similar roles may not be keen for their salary banding to be public knowledge.

We understand that this may make things seem a little more difficult for job seekers, but, although we are often not permitted to disclose the salary on the advert itself, for the vacancies we are working on we will always be happy to disclose information about the salary of the role if you are registered with us or send us your CV when you enquire about the position.

Salary advice before submission

We will always be clear on the salary range available for a job before we agree with you to submit your application.  You will have the opportunity to state your desired salary, so that expectations on this issue are managed on both sides from the outset.

In most cases, we will be able to provide greater detail than is supplied on the advert and this ensures no candidate arrives at an interview only to discover that the salary offered for a job does not meet their requirements. We are here to help on that front and can add a level of insight and transparency.

Call our Consultants

Don’t be shy of calling a telephone number on an advert for more information about the salary level. In some cases the advertiser may not be able to give you an exact figure, but in those cases, we would advise that you give the hiring manager or recruiter an idea of the salary that you would be looking for and they should be able to tell you if the position advertised would be in line with that.

At Atwood Tate, we are all for transparency and we will do our best to provide as much relevant information as possible when guiding you through the application process.

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SYP Panel Talk: “How to assert yourself in publishing”

SYP Panel Talk: “How to assert yourself in publishing”

On Tuesday night, I went to my first SYP event, which was a panel talk on “How to assert yourself in publishing”. On the panel were: Roly Allen (@roly_allen) a Publisher at Ilex, part of Hachette UK,  Bryony Woods (@BryonyWoods)  Literary Agent at Diamond Khan and Woods,  Ailah Ahmed (@ailahahmed), Commissioning Editor at Little, Brown, part of Hachette UK, and Pinelopi Pourpoutidou, Head of Foreign & Digital Sales at Michael O’Mara Publishing.

Discussion ranged from topics such as knowing when it is time to speak up in meetings, what confidence is, and whether maternity-leave affects career progression, and what can be done to change this. Here are 7 of the top tips to take away from the evening.

 

On Applications…

1. Keep your cover letters short and specific to the job

Cover letters do not need be very long. Half a side of A4 will suffice. Make it short and sharp and to the point. Outline your key skills and how they make you suitable for the requirements of the role. Investigate the company, know what they do. Say why you want to work for them and why they should want you to work for them.

2. Sell yourself in your interests.

The interests section in your CV is your chance to sell yourself, and gives the company an idea of you as a real person. Be honest, but also be professional. Do you play sports, play in a band, part of an activity/ interest club, been travelling? Make sure you share!

 

On Confidence…

3. Fake it till you make it

Few people can start in a role and have complete confidence right away. It is learnt over time as you acclimatise to the role. Being nervous as you start out is normal, but if you are not confident, you can just pretend you are. The panel suggested Amy Cuddy’s method of ‘Fake it Till You Make It”. Watch her TED Talk on it here: https://www.ted.com/talks/amy_cuddy_your_body_language_shapes_who_you_are

The panel also suggested Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg as a resource particularly for women with tips and advice on how to build confidence and how to be a successful leader in the workplace.

 4. Loudness isn’t confidence- knowing what you’re talking about is.

Don’t think that you will come across as confident just by talking louder and being brash and confrontational. Being quieter and more introverted doesn’t mean that you are less effective or less valuable. What is important is preparing your facts before you talk and share. An idea that you have investigated and can support with facts and realistic costings is much more useful than something unprepared, said loudly.

5. Form a support network, even if just an informal one.

One tip suggested, especially to benefit people from minorities with less representation in the industry, was to form a support network with people in the industry who have come from a similar background. Either in your company, or out wider out into the industry; find someone or a group of people who are at a similar stage to you, and people you feel you can confide in, and ask advice from, who you can meet up with once a month over a coffee.

6. Don’t be afraid of speaking up in meetings, but know when to stop.

If you have an idea that is relevant, share it. But if you are told it will not work, then know when to stop.

 

On Asking for More…

7. When to ask for a pay rise

The panel suggested that you should perhaps start thinking about asking for a pay rise after a year into a role. An employer should not think less of you for asking, and the worst that they can say is no. If they do reject your request, ask if you can review this decision in 3 to 6 months. They suggested that you should pick your time to ask also based on what the situation of both you and your company are. If the company is making cut backs, it might not be the correct time to ask. But if you have had a period of success (as opposed to just one success), then you should ask. Your request should make a case for your worth to the company, and why you deserve this rise.

 

This was a fascinating talk, and all the speakers were enthusiastic and entertaining. Thanks to the speakers and The SYP for hosting the event!

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A Day In The Life Of . . . A Temporary Rights and Permissions Assistant

Today, we have another of our temporary workers, breaking down their role as a Rights and Permissions Assistant for us!

What was your role and how long was the assignment for?

I started on a six week placement which extended to three months reviewing permission logs.  This then progressed to the current temporary contract and I have been in this role for 2 ½ years.

Were you interviewed for the role?  Yes

What were your key duties?

Reviewing published books to check any third party items such as images and quotes had been cleared for use.

Processing incoming permissions queries, preparing licenses and invoices

Processing incoming translation and other rights requests, negotiating the terms and fee payable, preparing the contract and invoice

Some marketing of titles for rights selling

Tell us about the culture?

Everyone at the company is very friendly and helpful (which has been great given how many questions I have asked of people).  Everyone is keen to produce the best books they can.  Many roles include foreign travel and even if you stay in the UK you are always working with people around the world both inside and outside the company which gives a real multi-cultural flavour to the role.

What did you like best?

There are so many things, among them I really enjoy being able to tell authors that their books are being translated. Seeing the translated books when they arrive is always a great pleasure as you never really know how they will look until you see them.

What did you learn?

Everything!  I had never done this role before and so it has been a real baptism of fire as I have learned how to use new systems and databases, copyright rules as well as refining my negotiation skills.

How did you find your experience with Atwood Tate? Great, Kellie, Michael and the team have always been very supportive and helpful at every step.

How did Atwood Tate approach you for the role? Atwood Tate’s database, job board?  I first contacted Atwood Tate after seeing the role on The Bookseller website and then spoke with Kellie about it in further detail.

Interested in temporary opportunities? Please contact Atwood Tate’s temps team administrator, Michael Lawlor michaellawlor@atwoodtate.co.uk

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Job Roles In Publishing

Our last Q&A dealt with job sectors, breaking them down for candidates to better understand what each entailed and the kind of skills required to excel within them. This week, we’re tackling job roles in publishing! Here’s a brief overview:

Marketing – Marketing campaigns. Social media. SEO. Promotional copy. Analytics. These are just some of the duties you’ll be carrying out within marketing. A keen understanding of your market and strong interpersonal skill are a must.

Sales – Targets. Lead generation. Events. Duties will vary from sector to sector and can include sales rep roles for trade publishing to delegate, sponsorship and advertising sales positions. The ability to excel in a fast-paced environment as well as work autonomously is key to these roles.

Rights – Negotiation. Contracts. Trade conferences. This job role suits numerical candidates who will enjoy negotiating contracts and securing publishing rights for books with foreign and domestic publishers.

Production – Typesetting. Proofreading. Processing orders. A role for the technically minded, it calls for strong IT skills including proficiency in InDesign and CMS. Depending on sector, you could be working on magazines, journals, textbooks or fiction/non-fiction titles.

Editorial – Copyediting. Administration. Photo research. Just some of the duties that fall within editorial’s remit. This role proves to be quite popular and naturally requires a creative candidate with excellent oral and written skills but being adept at general administrative tasks is also crucial.

Design – Adobe Creative Suite. CSS. Javascript. Technical skills are an absolute necessity for design roles as well as a creative flair that can be used to create a strong visual company brand.

There are of course other job roles we could cover, from HR and Finance to IT and Operations, but these roles typically fall within or work to support one of the above categories.

So, if you’re thinking about beginning a career in publishing, it’s good to assess your experience and decide what skills you would like to develop further! And if you have any questions, be sure to join us on Twitter @AtwoodTate tomorrow at 12 noon for our fortnightly Q&A on job roles!

Alternatively, you can contact us in London at london@atwoodtate.co.uk and in Oxford at oxford@atwoodtate.co.uk.

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