Category Archives: Industry News & Events

Write-ups of conferences and events that have been happening around the Industry.

Guest Post: What will defy, embrace or become a disruption in scholarly publishing?

We are thrilled to bring you a guest post on our blog from Jessica Edwards, as she reflects her thoughts on the BookMachine’s recent event, ‘Scholarly Publishing: Crossing the Rubicon’.

What will defy, embrace or become a disruption in scholarly publishing?

Thoughts from BookMachine’s latest event

‘Scholarly Publishing: Crossing the Rubicon’

By Jessica Edwards

The Jam Factory, Oxford, 7 September 2017

Image courtesy of Michael Belcher, Marketing Manager at Ingenta

Image courtesy of Michael Belcher, Marketing Manager at Ingenta

Last Thursday, as I trundled slowly towards Oxford (kicking myself for accidentally catching a slow train – who knew there were quite so many stations between Reading and Oxford?!) I wondered what was in store at BookMachine’s latest event, ‘Scholarly Publishing: Crossing the Rubicon’. Arriving at The Jam Factory, I scanned the room of busily-networking people and took a deep breath. Although I’ve now worked in publishing for over 2 years, and always enjoy chatting to inspired publishing-types, a few seconds of panic always descends when, turning from the table of beverages, glass in hand, the reality hits that one must shuffle into a group at random and strike up a conversation. Thankfully, I was lucky enough to approach two lovely individuals from Atwood Tate – Claire Louise Kemp and Alice Crick. Not only were they extremely friendly, our conversation (and Claire Louise spotting me scribbling notes during the panel discussion) led to the suggestion, offer, and composition of this blog post!

My name’s Jess Edwards, and I’m currently Marketing Executive at Gale, a Cengage Company. Gale creates digital resources (from journal and eBook databases to digital archives) for academic, special, school and government libraries worldwide. Consequently, when the advert for BookMachine’s scholarly publishing seminar popped into my inbox, it not only looked interesting but extremely relevant to my current position, and I quickly purchased an early-bird ticket!

There were four engaging speakers on the panel. Phill Jones, Director of Innovation at Digital Science, a company who invest and nurture research start-ups creating software to aid scientific research; Charlie Rapple, Sales & Marketing Director and co-founder of Kudos, a platform which increases research impact by driving discovery and facilitating the sharing of academic work; Byron Russell, Head of Ingenta Connect, a publisher-facing content management system that enables publishers to convert, store and deliver digital content; and Duncan Campbell, Director of Digital Licensing and Sales Partnerships at John Wiley & Sons, ranked ninth on the Publisher’s Weekly list of the world’s 50 largest publishers, 2017. Bringing together speakers (and an audience) from both large, established publishers and newer, often technology-based start-ups, led to some interesting discussion on the relationships between the two; the responsibilities of each; and whether one or the other is best placed to cope with the disruptive forces in publishing – or themselves be disruptive.

The discussion generated by the panel was wide-ranging and insightful, broadening my understanding of the challenges, relationships and roles in publishing beyond my own. It made me think more deeply about the hugely influential and clearly disruptive issues looming over the industry, as well as the ideas and innovations which currently exist around the edges of the industry, meeting niche requirements today, but which could, in time, disrupt, engulf or evolve the whole publishing landscape.

Insights and topics of discussion that I found particularly intriguing include:

  • The symbiotic relationship between start-ups and established publishers

The opening discussion about innovation in publishing included the suggestion that it is more difficult for established companies to innovate – something easier for new-comers. However, there was also an agreement that innovation is a necessity at every tier of the industry. The conversation moved on to the common practice of publishers supporting innovation elsewhere; encouraging and funding the technological start-ups often responsible for floating fresh new ideas. The arguments were put forward that these start-ups rely on funding and support from the publishing establishment, who had a responsibility to nurture them. Yet the establishment in turn rely on the innovation of the start-ups for their own development and evolution – often acquiring them down-the-line as part of their innovation strategy – thus the relationship could be described as cyclical or symbiotic.

  • Piracy V. Green OA

Although I was relatively familiar with the term ‘Open Access’, I was not with ‘Green OA’. (This was one of the things I was inspired to google following the event, and consequently am now aware of both green and gold OA!) Reference to green OA was made in discussion of the threat and disruptive nature of piracy in the publishing industry. There was also consideration of how attitudes towards sharing have changed over time – and where the fine line now sits between piracy and OA. It was suggested that in the past, if one academic was to email an article to another based elsewhere, it would have been seen by publishers as an infringement of copyright. Now, perceptions of sharing have evolved, with the industry instead taking an observational approach; monitoring such behaviours with the intent to better understand the market. The distinction was made, however, and agreed upon unanimously by the panel, that sharing on a need-to-know basis remains different from mass-uploads by networks such as Sci-Hub. Yet it was also recognised that such ‘dark’ enterprises are also examples of innovation forcing the publishing industry to evolve. The disruptive impact of such ‘dark’ innovation was nicely summarised by Phill Jones: ‘It has forced the agenda, but at the same time, it’s not the solution.’

It’s testament to how packed, insightful and content-rich the discussion was that I could go on…! However, this blog post is already heading towards classification as a tome, so I won’t elaborate on the other interesting discussions, though will squeeze in that these included the impact of new business models such as ‘Netflix for journal articles’(!), how a trend towards trans-disciplinary research and developments in research evaluation will affect publishing, and the future of Discovery Systems.

All-in-all, I highly recommend anyone interested in learning more about a particular area of publishing, or the industry in general, goes along to a BookMachine event. Absorb what the experts have to say – it will almost certainly come in useful in the not-so-distant future – and meander your way into a conversation during the networking drinks – who knows what connections you’ll make, you might even end up writing a blog post for somebody!

A little like Where’s Wally…spot me in the stripey top! Image courtesy of Michael Belcher, Marketing Manager at Ingenta.

A little like Where’s Wally…spot me in the stripey top! Image courtesy of Michael Belcher, Marketing Manager at Ingenta.

Nb. All views are my own, and not those of Gale, Atwood Tate, or BookMachine. If I have misrepresented any of the discussion or speakers’ arguments, this is down to my own misunderstanding.

Twitter @Jessica2Edwards

https://www.linkedin.com/in/jessicaedwards1/

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International Literacy Day

Today, 8th September, is International Literacy Day, a day observed by UN member states to internationally recognise the importance of literacy to individuals, communities and societies, and aims to increase literacy around the world.

You can read more about the aims of this international day here on the UNESCO website: http://en.unesco.org/themes/literacy-all/literacy-day.

This year, the focus is on Digital Literacy, and how the changes in technology and the move towards new digital environments is changing the understanding of what literacy is, and how a lack of digital literacy skills could further marginalise those without basic literacy skills.

To mark this day, some of Atwood Tate have thought back to those books which were formative in helping us learn to read initially; books which are often forgotten but are hugely important first steps.

Andrew Willis

The first  books I can remember reading were The Magic Key series, which followed Biff, Chip and Kipper, created by Roderick Hunt and published by Oxford University Press. As part of the National Curriculum, a whole generation must have learnt to read, thanks in part to The Magic Key.

Alice Crick

I still remember my parents reading the very first Harry Potter books to me as a child. It really instilled the joys of reading in me from an early age.

Claire Louise Kemp

I don’t remember learning to read, but some of the first books I remember loving were books by Beatrix Potter and the Mr Men books.

Helen Speedy

I loved the Usborne Book of Wizards and the Usborne Book of Witches.  The illustrations by the late Stephen Cartwright take me right back to childhood when I look at them now and I’m so pleased to see that they are still in print, even if it’s in a slightly different format.  I also used to spend hours looking through The Usborne First Thousand Words trying to spot the little duck in each picture. My Mum, a German teacher, also bought us a copy of this in German in the hope we’d also become linguists…

 

Atwood Tate support the charity Beanstalk, who do fantastic work providing one-to-one literacy support to children who struggle with their reading ability and confidence.

 

 

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BAME in Publishing: One Year On

We are very pleased to bring you a guest post from Sarah Shaffi and Wei Ming Kam, founders of BAME in Publishing, a group which aims to support and encourage people from Black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds in the publishing industry.

Last year, they wrote a blog post for us about why they set up the group and provided some advice for working in the industry, which you can read here.

One year on, they reflect on their experiences of the group, and if anything has changed:

Five things we’ve learnt in a year of BAME in Publishing…

A year ago we set up BAME in Publishing – a networking group for people from black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds working in publishing, or wanting to break into the industry. Here are five things we’ve learnt from running the group.

  • BAME in Publishing fills a gap

When we set up the group, we weren’t sure if anyone was going to be interested, but even a year later we’re still getting new members, and all our meetings are full. It’s shown us that there is a real thirst for a group and a space when BAME people can form relationships, get career advice, and feel like they belong.

  • Don’t be afraid to ask for help/favours

We’ve turned to a lot of different people for help with various things and have been surprised how many want to support us in any way they can. We’ve been offered venues to host meet ups from publishers and bookshops, and it’s been heartening to know that much of the industry supports the work we do.

  • There are BAME people in the industry

Sometimes it feels like there are hardly any people from BAME backgrounds working in publishing, but running BAME in Publishing we’ve seen that this isn’t true. Our members come from all kinds of companies – big, small, trade, academic, publishers, agencies and so one. BAME talent is out there, which is encouraging, however…

  • There is a long way to go

It’s clear from our membership that a lot of the BAME talent are in junior positions. There are definitely some great senior role models out there (Ailah Ahmed from Virago, Natalie Jerome and Perminder Mann at Kings Road Publishing to name a few), but more needs to be done to make sure junior staff rise up the ranks quickly so that they can affect real change when it comes to the ethnic diversity of the industry. However, we do think that…

  • The future is bright

One thing we see at meeting after meeting is that there are so many talented people coming into publishing who want to make a difference, publish brilliant books, and be the leaders of tomorrow. We have no doubt that today’s bright young things will be heading up tomorrow’s publishing houses.

Wei Ming Kam and Sarah Shaffi at the BAME in Publishing 1st Birthday Party

Sarah Shaffi is online editor and producer at The Bookseller and tweets @sarahshaffi . Wei Ming Kam is sales and marketing executive at Oberon Books and tweets @weimingkam.

For more on BAME in Publishing, visit bameinpublishing.tumblr.com. You can also check out the #BAMEinPublishing hashtag on twitter and follow them on Instagram.

The group meets regularly, mostly in Central London. If you are interested in joining, please email bameinpublishing@gmail.com with your full name, email address, company you work for and your position (if applicable).

BAME in Publishing has been shortlisted for the #HClub100. Vote for them here!

 

 

Atwood Tate Limited embraces diversity and aims to promote the benefits of diversity in all of our business activities. For more information visit our policies page https://www.atwoodtatepublishingjobs.co.uk/policies/

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Filling the Gap – An Increase in Temp Hire

Recently, the REC released the results of a Jobs Outlook research study that indicated employers were predicting a greater reliance on temporary workers in the near future due to a shortage of skills. It showed that 20% of UK employers planned to increase agency workers in the medium term.

The likely reason for this is that temp workers allow a certain level of flexibility for employers and can help with the skills gap. It is also beneficial to workers who are looking to avoid long-term commitments. While temporary or contract roles might seem to lack stability or job security, we have found that many of our candidates prefer these types of roles as it enables them to quickly develop skills and move on into new and challenging environments. A quarter (24 per cent) transfer at least half of their temporary workers to permanent positions each year. We’ve seen this ourselves first-hand as many of our temps have been made permanent, due to their hard work and dedication. It goes to show what making the right impression can do!

The research also indicated that the attitudes of larger companies around temporary workers have also changed and there is a marked increase in employers planning to increase these numbers in the short-term.

Here at Atwood Tate, there’s no fear about a shortage of skills! Our desk is dedicated to sourcing temporary workers and our track record of placing candidates in a variety of short-term and contract roles gives us the confidence to know we can provide much needed support to clients during this period.

Many of our clients have come to us to recruit interim support (urgent, fast and speedy placements – reliable temps with the required skill set and attitude). While it may seem like a period of uncertainty, we see it as more of an opportunity for both employers and employees to ‘try each other out’.

So, if you are looking for temporary workers, do get in touch. And if you are a candidate who has been considering a job change but were nervous about the current market, just give us a call and we can let you know about some of the opportunities that are currently out there. Remember, it doesn’t always have to be permanent to be the right choice for you. There are often no interviews and the hiring process can happen so quickly, you can often find yourself working the very next day!

If you are interested in temping with Atwood Tate or are looking for interim support, please get in touch with:

Kellie Millar

kelliemillar@atwoodtate.co.uk

02070347897

Alison Redfearn

alisonredfearn@atwoodtate.co.uk

02070347922

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Publishing and the unpaid internship

A recent article in the Bookseller covered the attitudes changing around the unpaid internship. For some time now, there has been a building frustration with how impenetrable the publishing industry can be to people who cannot afford to undergo the necessary work placements that make finding one’s first job that much more viable.

Those already in publishing have recognised this roadblock and are making significant steps to facilitate entry into the industry for those candidates who may have considered it an impossible option previously. Paid internships are slowly but surely becoming a feature of some of the larger publishers, who have determined to increase diversity through any and all means. It is certainly a cause for celebration for a lot of recent graduates but also for anyone who has hoped to make the move into publishing from another industry but could never forgo a regular income, even for a short period of time.

Atwood Tate’s temp’s team have helped a number of graduates unable to work unpaid, get their first paid job in publishing. Publishers are always looking for support staff with some office and administration experience, and contact the Atwood Tate temps team often with urgent, start next day roles.

Candidates that do not have a traditional background in publishing also have found their way into the industry through our desk and it is a great source of pride to us that we are able to provide the underdog with a much-needed chance to live their dream.

We do also help interns to build on the experience they have gained and get paid roles. We act as another lever into the industry and our clients come to us when they need help managing a volume of roles or need temp staff quickly.

So, while the industry slowly brings about the necessary changes to internships, Atwood Tate is here to lend a hand. Get in touch, send your CV. We’re here to advise you, and answer questions about salary, job types, the different sectors, feel to pick our brains and see if we can help you get your foot on the publishing ladder!

Our contact details are below and we look forward to hearing from you!

Kellie Millar                                                              Alison Redfearn

0207034787                                                             02070347922

kelliemillar@atwoodtate.co.uk                            alisonredfearn@atwoodtate.co.uk

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Job Roles In Publishing

Our last Q&A dealt with job sectors, breaking them down for candidates to better understand what each entailed and the kind of skills required to excel within them. This week, we’re tackling job roles in publishing! Here’s a brief overview:

Marketing – Marketing campaigns. Social media. SEO. Promotional copy. Analytics. These are just some of the duties you’ll be carrying out within marketing. A keen understanding of your market and strong interpersonal skill are a must.

Sales – Targets. Lead generation. Events. Duties will vary from sector to sector and can include sales rep roles for trade publishing to delegate, sponsorship and advertising sales positions. The ability to excel in a fast-paced environment as well as work autonomously is key to these roles.

Rights – Negotiation. Contracts. Trade conferences. This job role suits numerical candidates who will enjoy negotiating contracts and securing publishing rights for books with foreign and domestic publishers.

Production – Typesetting. Proofreading. Processing orders. A role for the technically minded, it calls for strong IT skills including proficiency in InDesign and CMS. Depending on sector, you could be working on magazines, journals, textbooks or fiction/non-fiction titles.

Editorial – Copyediting. Administration. Photo research. Just some of the duties that fall within editorial’s remit. This role proves to be quite popular and naturally requires a creative candidate with excellent oral and written skills but being adept at general administrative tasks is also crucial.

Design – Adobe Creative Suite. CSS. Javascript. Technical skills are an absolute necessity for design roles as well as a creative flair that can be used to create a strong visual company brand.

There are of course other job roles we could cover, from HR and Finance to IT and Operations, but these roles typically fall within or work to support one of the above categories.

So, if you’re thinking about beginning a career in publishing, it’s good to assess your experience and decide what skills you would like to develop further! And if you have any questions, be sure to join us on Twitter @AtwoodTate tomorrow at 12 noon for our fortnightly Q&A on job roles!

Alternatively, you can contact us in London at london@atwoodtate.co.uk and in Oxford at oxford@atwoodtate.co.uk.

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Job Sectors in Publishing

Today, we wanted to do a brief breakdown on the different job sectors in publishing for you. A lot of graduates are interested in working in publishing but are not always sure exactly what sector they would like to work in. It’s good to keep an open mind but to also have an understanding of the fundamentals of each sector and whether it might suit you:

Business Publishing (B2B): B2B stands for Business-to-Business and means producing specialist publications and media for businesses and specialist consumer markets. Sales and marketing roles are prevalent within this sector and editorial positions will often call for journalistic qualifications like NCTJ.

Academic Publishing: This sector is responsible for the distribution of academic research and scholarly, peer reviewed articles. It suits details-oriented people, often with an academic background.

STM Publishing: STM stands for Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishing and they report on scholarly research. Like academic publishing, it suits candidates motivated by research as well as a demonstrable interest in scientific reportage.

Educational Publishing: This sector covers a variety of educational publications, from ELT (English Language Training) to creating accessible fiction for struggling readers. It can often suit candidates with a teaching background and a working knowledge of the educational system.

Professional Publishing: This sector is geared towards management and administrators within business, finance and legal industries. Like B2B, it can often require journalistic qualifications and a comprehensive knowledge of one’s subject from finance, government or law.

Print/Production Services & Library Suppliers/Distributors: This sector involves large-scale production of reading materials and is a strong area for technical-minded production assistants and controllers and candidates with an interest in logistics and operations.

Digital/Emerging Technologies: This sector is for the tech-savvy out there, candidates who have a passion for digital products, who can write about them, market them or develop them from inception.

Charity Publishing: This sector contains charities who predominantly publish their own list of titles, to increase awareness about the work they do. Candidates with an interest in local and global issues as well as a desire to make a contribution generally lean towards this area.

Publishing/Rights/Licensing Jobs: This sector covers agencies who cover copying and re-use of previously published content. They also collect licensing revenue for publishers. Candidates interested in rights and legal compliance can excel here.

Trade Publishing: Finally, Trade, one of most popular sectors for publishing graduates. This covers fiction, non-fiction and children’s publishing. It is a natural fit for creative types and, with trade editorial being perhaps the most applied for role in the industry, one might consider opting for an alternative job type within this sector, such as sales, marketing and operations.

There’s more information on our website for each sector and you can always get in touch with your questions. Once you know the direction you want to move in, you can start your journey! Contact us in London at london@atwoodtate.co.uk and in Oxford at oxford@atwoodtate.co.uk.

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SYP Practical Workshops: How to be a Booktuber

How to be a booktuber

SYP Practical Workshops: How to be a BookTuber

On Monday evening our Administrator and Social Media Coordinator Ellie was lucky enough to attend the first of the Society of Young Publishers (SYP) Practical workshops. The topic was:

How to be Booktuber.

The workshops are a new yearly series of workshops occurring once a month, about a different topic each month. For a full list of the upcoming workshops and how to apply to take part in one take a look at the SYP’s page here.

This workshop was run by an established Booktuber: Leena Normington, aka justkissmyfrog on YouTube.

Leena has previously worked as a Creative Producer for Pan Macmillan, running their BookBreak series on YouTube, and currently works for the Telegraph. She has been a Booktuber for 7 years and was happy to share some tips and practical advice about starting a BookTube channel.

Held at Hachette, the evening consisted of a lot of laughter, discussions and a task of pitching a YouTube video around a certain book.

The workshop was fully attended by 10 people so everyone got a chance to speak, ask questions and generally chat about the different ways YouTube can helping the publishing community within publicity, marketing, sales and more.

Here are our three top tips we took from the event:

  • Affiliate links on YouTube channels

Affiliate links are links to website and booksellers online where viewers of YouTube videos can purchase any of the products, in this case books, discussed within the video. Not only are these links great for promoting books but they’re also fantastic for monitoring how many and what type of books are being bought by the audience. Through this information a Booktuber can monitor the tastes of their audience and adapt to suit them, as well as prove that BookTube sells books!

  • YouTube & Google Analytics

Views are not everything…no, really! On YouTube when you post a video you can go to the Creator Studio and view your analytics for your channel and each individual video. Whilst getting 1000 views on a video would be fantastic, it’s better if the watch time of the video (the average length of time a person spent viewing the video) is higher or equal to the length of the video. If you have 1000 views, but the viewers only spent an average of 30 seconds watching a 4 minute video, this actually shows that this video wasn’t as successful as you thought. If a video has only 100 views but was watched for the entirety of its length this was a more successful video.

  • Tone & Topic

A strong point to take away from this workshop was the need for a consistent tone and topic across all social media channels within business. If a business has a Twitter, Instagram, newsletter etc, when building a new YouTube channel you need to build a channel that matches the established social media in tone and topic. It would be jarring to create fun, bright videos about different topics if the company’s other social media is very serious and focused solely on one topic.

BookTube is a growing social media platform, one which we ourselves have begun, and has been featured recently at several events. You can read about the BookTube event ran by BookMachine last month here.

This workshop was a lot of fun and left Ellie with a lot of information to take away; from software advice to campaign planning. It it was a fantastic evening with Leena and other SYP members and we can’t wait to hear about, and maybe attend, some of the next workshops!

For more information the workshops be sure to follow the SYP on twitter at @SYP_UK and also follow the official hashtag for the workshops: #SYPpubskills

Do you like the sound of BookTube or the SYP workshops? Let us know on any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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The Benefits of Being a Niche Recruitment Agency

Benefits of being a niche recruitment

The Benefits of Being a Niche Recruitment Agency

Today we wanted to share the benefits of registering with a niche recruitment agency like Atwood Tate. We’re a niche agency as we only handle recruitment within the Publishing industry; this includes publishing of books, journals, magazines and online content in these sectors: academic, educational, professional, STM, trade books, business information and events, plus companies that help deliver content (but excluding newspapers or consumer magazines).

Here are some of the benefits of our being a niche agency, and how it can help you find a job within publishing:

1.       Subject Knowledge

Being a niche agency it is particularly useful to have recruitment consultants who have experience in the industry for which we are recruiting. All of our team members have experience in publishing through past careers in Rights, Marketing, Editing and Recruitment at various publishing houses in different sectors, across the globe. This makes us specifically qualified to understand what our clients are looking for in candidates and which skills are relevant on a candidate’s CV for each job.

        2. Networking

Having a team with a past in publishing is also useful in creating contacts and networking! The publishing industry is a particularly friendly industry which often converses through social media and events on a regular basis. Because of our networking and past involvement in the industry we have contacts in nearly all sectors of publishing. As such we are a trusted recruitment agency with an exceptionally strong client list.

        3. Social Media

Since we’re a niche recruitment agency all of our social media and advice posts are focussed around the publishing industry! Whilst our advice on writing CVs and Cover Letters can be applied, mostly, across all industries, are blog posts on Design CVs and YouTube videos on Academic Publishing for example, are tailored to our candidates’ needs and requests!

        4. Strong Candidates

Our clients know that when we send them a CV we are sending them a strong applicant with all the skills required for the role. With our knowledge of the industry and our registration process we can find the perfect role for each candidate, and the perfect candidate for each role. If you haven’t got the skills or experience for a particular job just yet, we can advise you on the right direction to obtain those skills and we work with you throughout your career.

          5. Temps Desk

Temps are an incredibly useful workforce in publishing. They can help cover particularly busy times of the year, such as the London Book Fair, and fill in a role during the recruitment process. Since we’re a specialist niche agency, all of our temps have the necessary skills to come into a publishing company and do the work required without much instruction.

For more information on Atwood Tate’s services and team take a look at look at our website.

You can also contact us via social media: TwitterFacebook, LinkedInYouTube or Instagram.

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Our Favourite Children’s Books

Childrens Books

Our Favourite Children’s Books

This week is the Bologna Children’s Book Fair! We’re not attending this event (we’re still not over the London Book Fair) but we’re keeping up to date with all the exciting deals and news on the latest books.

In honour of the Bologna Book Fair, and it’s speciality towards children’s books, we thought we would share some of our teams favourite children’s books!

Lucy Slater, Recruitment Consultant:

Lucy’s favourite childhood books include a sweet story about family life, the tale of a cuddly bear and another book on an odorous witch with Goblins for next door neighbours.

Michael Lawlor, Temps Team Administrator:

Michael’s favourite childhood book is all about two amphibious friends who go on lots of adventures!

Ellie Pilcher, Administrator & Social Media Coordinator:

Ellie’s favourite stories are big childhood classics, about family, fantasy worlds and lots of magic!

Claire Louise Kemp, Senior Recruitment Consultant:

Claire Louise’s favourite childhood book is a story about a Guinea Pig, called Olga da Polga, and her animal friends.

Alison Redfearn, Recruitment Consultant:

Alison’s favourite books are classics about a friendly dog called Hairy, a Witch who really isn’t very good at magic and a little girl with special powers and  a love of reading.

Olivia Constantinides, Senior Recruitment Consultant

Olivia couldn’t get enough Jacqueline Wilson when she was younger, she thinks she must have read them all!

Helen Speedy, Associate Director

Helen’s favourite books include a story about a boy and his toy dog, a tale about a horrible, smelly couple who are tricked by monkeys, and a series of books about four best friends and a pair of travelling pants (jeans).

Karine Nicpon, Senior Recruitment Consultant:

Karine’s favourite books are a mix of French and English novels. A very funny picture book about a masked chick called Blaise, a series of books about five children solving mysteries, and a revised children’s version of an English classic (which she was later very pleased to find she could read for the first time all over again when she got the original copy!)

David Martin, Recruitment Consultant

David’s favourite books are both Roald Dahl classics! One’s about a group of evil witches who hate children, and the other’s about a young boy who gets his revenge on an evil landowner.

What are some of your favourite children’s books?

Let us know in the comments below or on our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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