Category Archives: Industry Spotlight

Industry Spotlight: STM Publishing

Welcome to Atwood Tate’s industry spotlight series, where we go behind the scenes of each of our recruitment desks to give you the scoop on working with Atwood Tate. This week Clare returns, focusing on roles in STM publishingSTM word cloud

 

What does ‘STM’ means in publishing?

STM publishing refers to scholarly, Scientific, Technical, Medical and professional publishers.  In Atwood Tate, we work with a wide range of publishers from academic and scientific publishers, learned societies, open-access publishers and professional bodies to reach out to publishing professionals.  The content is often journals or books based, for journals, there are open-access journals and subscription journals.

What will be the academic requirement?

The majority of roles we work on require a scientific degree.  It is not often that a Master’s or PhD is required but for senior editorial positions, especially working on a particular scientific subject, it is likely that a specific academic background will be needed. However, for roles that are more operational or with a strategic focus, companies might be more flexible on educational background.  Some candidates have, for example, an English degree who now work in a managerial STM publishing role so never say never!

What roles do we work on within STM publishing?

We work on roles from junior to senior level.  From Editorial or Publication Assistant, to middleweight Production Editor or Commissioning Editor; senior level Managing Editor or Publishing Operations Manager and so on.  STM publishing is a big area and it is full of potential to transfer your expertise.

Is there good progression in STM Publishing?

STM publishing is fast growing and blooming quickly so there will definitely be good progression.  Through working with different portfolio of journals and academia, you will grow your network and gain a wider knowledge of STM publishing.  Currently, a lot of STM publishers are expanding and restructuring so there are definitely opportunities to grow your career in the field.

If you are looking for a job in STM Publishing, get in touch with Clare at clarechan@atwoodtate.co.uk.

Atwood Tate is a member of ALPSP (The Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers).

Keep an eye out for ScholarlySocial @ScholarlySocial which has networking meetings.

 

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Industry Spotlight: Marketing and Publicity

Welcome to Atwood Tate’s industry spotlight series, where we go behind the scenes of each of our recruitment desks to give you the scoop on working with Atwood Tate. This week, Olivia returns, focusing on Marketing and Publicity roles.

marketing strategy image

Marketing

What do Marketers in publishing do?

Marketers are responsible for promoting a publisher’s products or services to their target audience, whether that be to individual consumers (B2C) or other businesses (B2B). Marketing can broadly be split into traditional (e.g. print advertisements, newsletters, flyers, brochures) and digital (e.g. social media, email, websites, paid search, SEO). The majority of marketing roles in publishing combine the two or are digital focused, so it’s advisable to keep your digital skills up to date.

Marketers have many different channels and techniques at their disposal and roles will vary depending on the nature of the product or service and target audience. For example, if you are marketing books to teachers you are likely to produce a lot of visually appealing marketing collateral and do a lot of direct mail campaigns. On the other hand, if you are marketing a medical journal to doctors you will likely target them with intellectually stimulating email campaigns.

Do you need a marketing qualification to work in marketing?

Absolutely not. It’s something employers might find desirable but a lot of people start out in an entry level role and build up from there. Some people choose a qualification once they’ve built up some experience and decided on an area to specialise in. The Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM) and Institute of Direct and Digital Marketing (IDM) both provide qualifications which can be studied for alongside a full-time job. Your employer may even cover the cost of the course.

Where can a marketing job take me?

Marketing is great in that the skills and knowledge you develop are very transferable and will be useful for so many employers and different industries. There are a wealth of marketing roles in publishing. Some people choose to stay in one area of publishing for most of their career while others move around different sectors, which is possible to do, especially if you have particular skills or a specialism which is in high demand.

As there are so many marketing roles there are lots of opportunities for career progression and chances to move into management positions or very specialised roles.

publicist author interview

Publicity/PR

What do Publicists in publishing do?

Publicists are responsible for managing relationships with authors and dealing with their agents. Their job is to secure press coverage for books in the print, broadcast and online media so they are expected to build strong press relationships. They are also responsible for organising and attending events with authors, such as book launches and signings, interviews, author tours and appearances at literary festivals. Publicists need to stay informed about new trends and developments in their area of publishing and they often attend editorial meetings and contribute to pitches for new acquisitions.

Is PR all about parties and schmoozing with authors?

Yes, you might get the chance to work with high-profile and celebrity authors. You may also work with new and debut authors, which can be just as exciting and rewarding. Regardless of author list, there’s a lot of hard work and relationship building which goes into making any campaign successful.

Do you need a big network of media contacts?

Initially no. In junior roles you will be assisting PR Managers with their campaigns and general admin. As time goes on, you will start to build up a network of contacts. If you are working on particular titles, this may become quite specialised. For example, if you’re working with cookery authors, you will build up contacts with cookery magazines and food bloggers.

What skills do you need to succeed in marketing and publicity?

Marketing and publicity roles are closely linked and require similar skill sets. Anyone who wants to succeed in one of these roles needs superb communication and relationship building skills. They are busy jobs so excellent organisation skills are also essential. Creativity is also important. Some publishers work with small budgets, so you have to be innovative and resourceful to come up with new and inventive ideas. Keeping up to date with trends in the market is also key.

Marketers in particular often need to have strong copywriting skills and a good eye for detail. Photoshop and InDesign experience is a plus, especially if working in a collateral heavy role. Software skills are important as there are marketing programs you will be expected to use, such as CRM, email, social media, marketing automation software and analytics tools. There are a wealth of programs which do different things so it’s good if you can pick them up quickly. Video and audio content creation skills are increasingly desired in publishing, especially when working with online products.

If you are looking for a job in Marketing or Publicity, get in touch with Olivia at Olivia@atwoodtate.co.uk.

 

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Industry Spotlight: Production and Operations

Welcome to Atwood Tate’s industry spotlight series, where we go behind the scenes of each of our recruitment desks to give you the scoop on working with Atwood Tate. This week’s entry is with Clare Chan, who works on Science, Technical, Medical, Distribution, Operations and Production roles across London, the Home Counties and East Anglia. In this entry, Clare will be breaking down how to get into Production, Distribution and Operations in the publishing sector.

Production

production

What does ‘production’ mean in publishing?

There is a wide range of production roles in publishing, most commonly Production Assistant, Production Controller, Production Editor and Production Manager. Production itself can be varied– covering printed and digital books, printed and digital journals and more. The skill set of a Production Manager in trade books versus a professional publisher can be very different, so it is all down to the content of what is being published to determine what kind of production knowledge you should have or what duties you will be doing in the role. So a role in children’s books will probably be highly illustrated and need someone with a good eye for detail and 4 colour experience.

What will be the academic requirement?

There isn’t a specific requirement to get into production roles.  You will need to demonstrate substantial project and supplier management as well as excellent communication skills because the majority of the suppliers will be offshore.  You will also need to have good software skills, i.e. Excel spreadsheets, InDesign and Adobe CS, Biblio3 (especially for trade book publishers) or XML publishing (for digital publishing).

What background will the clients be looking for?

Your previous experience plays a significant role when it comes to applying for production jobs.  Production roles are not as fluid as one would think when it comes to switching roles.  For instance, if you wanted to become a Production Controller in a children’s book publisher, you should have novelty book production experience and also knowledge of European toy safety legislation.  And if you are to work for a journals publisher, you will be working as a Production Editor and dealing with external typesetters to get the journals published which often also requires copy-editing skills.  More details about Production Editor will be discussed in my next blog when I explore STM editorial roles – keep your eyes open for that!

Is there good progression in production?

There is a good progression and a clear career strucutre and you will also become a production specialist as you build up solid knowledge from previous experience. One thing to bear in mind is that production technology is ever changing so keeping up with new software and technology is essential.  The book industry is a great example: decades ago, it was all about off-set printing, but now we have digital printing as well as e-book and audiobook production.

What key skills do you need?

A good learning attitude is a must.  Good communication skills, project management, time management, account management as you will manage different suppliers (most often overseas) and there could be pressing deadlines from time to time so being organised is important too. Numerical skills are also important as you’ll could be working with Excel, calculating and negotiating costs for reprints and shipping etc.

Distribution and Operations

operations

What roles are there in the Distribution and Operations in publishing?

We deal with a range of distribution and operations roles. Examples of roles we recruit for include Inventory Assistant, Inventory Coordinator, Stock Controller, Supply Chain Manager, and Head of Operations. Distribution and Operations plays an essential part in a publishing house, monitoring the inventory and arrange reprint or stock movement when needed.

What skills or knowledge will the clients be looking for?

Analytical skills and excellent software knowledge. You will be using Excel spreadsheets a lot, including Excel formulas. Depending on the publishers, you might also need to have certain software knowledge.  Communication and organisation skills are also essential as you will be coordinating with in-house colleagues from Design, Editorial, Rights, Sales & Marketing as well as external suppliers.

Is there good progression?

Similar to Production roles, Distribution and Operations are also a specialist roles with good progression.  You may eventually lead the team and be promoted to Inventory Manager and Head of Operations.  Keeping up with the latest data management technology will also lead you a long way in the field.  Candidates with Production experience may move laterally into Distribution and Operations for a change in their career path. There are always new opportunities!

If you have any questions about Production, Distribution or Operations roles, feel free to get in touch with Clare at clarechan@atwoodtate.co.uk!

 

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Industry Spotlight: Regional Publishing (Oxford Office)

Welcome to Atwood Tate’s industry spotlight series, where we go behind the scenes of each of our recruitment desks to give you the scoop on working with Atwood Tate. This week’s entry is with Claire Carrington-Smith and Faye Jones, who work across all locations excluding London,the Home Counties and East Anglia. They cover all sectors except B2B.

Introduction

Welcome to the Oxford desk, which is looked after by Claire Carrington-Smith, Senior Publishing Recruitment Consultant and Faye Jones, Trainee Publishing Recruitment Consultant. We cover all roles in all sectors outside London, Home Counties and East Anglia (except B2B) so we are a busy desk over in our small office in lovely Summertown in Oxford.

Today we are going to focus in on regional publishing and give you some insight into what sectors we cover and the kind of roles that are available outside of London.

Are there publishing jobs outside of London and Oxford?

Yes! There are publishers working outside of London and Oxford in all areas of publishing around the UK and Internationally.

We have work with publishers based in areas that you would not necessarily associate with publishing and we are currently working on roles based in Northamptonshire, Wales and Sweden.

Most UK trade publishers are based in London and many candidates who want to start their career in publishers move there and do not necessarily think of Oxford or other areas of the UK. Many Educational and Academic publishers are in Oxford so if you want to get into either of those sectors Oxford is the place to be.

We do have some roles that are homeworking and this can be a big help for candidates with a long commute.

What areas of Publishing do you cover on the Oxford desk?

We cover a wide range of publishing sectors but in Oxford we mainly work on roles within educational, academic and professional publishing, however we do get the occasional role within Trade publishing but these roles do not come up very often.

We have worked on STM, Charity and production services roles and do get work with publishers within these sectors regularly as well.

What kinds of roles do you cover?

In Oxford, we cover everything, and we can be working on an editorial, production and marketing role at the same time in different areas of Oxford and the UK as a whole, so we are quite diverse in the roles that we cover.

We work with many smaller independent publishers who have between 15 and 25 members of staff. We do not get many publicity roles because we do not work with that many trade publishers.

Who do you work with?

We cover all roles and in all sectors outside London, Home Counties and East Anglia. We regularly work with Educational and academic publishers in and out of Oxford and we often visit our regular clients to talk about candidates and any future roles coming up.

We do work with some publishers on international roles and are looking forward to working on more roles outside the UK in future.

How does the Oxford desk differ from London?

The Oxford desk is not specialised in one specific area of publishing, meaning that we get to work on all roles with a variety of different publishers. In some ways, our job is more difficult as we are often searching for candidates that are not interested in moving outside of London or having a long commute into work, which is completely understandable. In other ways, our job is really enjoyable because we get to expand our knowledge on the publishing industry as a whole and look at developments within all publishing roles and sectors.

Do you have any advice for candidates looking to move out of London?

If you’re looking to work in publishing outside of London you need to be flexible with the sector that you want to go into as well as the location. Some of the publishers that we work with are not based in the south east of England and if you want to secure a job in publishing outside of Oxford or London you will need to think about relocating.

Being flexible on the location, job sector and sometimes the salary can be beneficial when looking for a job outside of London, the more flexible you are the better!

If you have any questions about publishing outside of London get in contact with the consultants in Oxford, Claire Carrington-Smith and Faye Jones.

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Industry Spotlight: Sales and Customer Service

 

Welcome to Atwood Tate’s industry spotlight series, where we go behind the scenes of each of our recruitment desks to give you the scoop on working with Atwood Tate. This week’s entry is with Olivia Constantinides, who works on Sales, Marketing, Publicity and Customer Service roles in London and East Anglia. She covers all sectors, except B2B.

In this spotlight Olivia will focus on Sales and Customer Service roles and will tell you more about what these jobs involve and the types of skills they require. At a later date she will cover Marketing and Publicity positions.

Types of roles

Sales roles in publishing are really diverse. Whether you’re an Account Manager looking after existing customers or a Business Development Manager focused on bringing in new business, your job is to build relationships with customers and persuade them to buy your company’s products or services.

One of the great things about working in sales is that you get to handle the finished product, whether that be a children’s book, a scientific journal or an online learning platform. You also get a real insight into the market and what the customer wants or needs. This knowledge is invaluable for the business as a whole and can be used to influence what is published in the future and how products are marketed to customers.

Some sales roles will include elements of customer service and if you’re selling digital products or software, you may train customers how to use it.

Customer service roles are closely linked to sales and involve dealing with the customer post-sales, usually over phone or email. Common responsibilities include answering order or stock related queries or resolving problems and complaints.

Do sales roles involve lots of cold calling?

A common misconception is that sales roles involve endless cold calling. It’s not usually like that in publishing. You might be selling books to bookshops or retailers, or software to universities, libraries and hospitals. Therefore you’ll need to meet customers face to face and adopt a softer and more consultative sales approach.

What is the pay like in sales?

Sales salaries often exceed those of other roles. In addition to your basic annual salary you will likely receive a bonus or commission based on the amount you sell and revenue that you bring in for the company. This might be paid out monthly, quarterly or annually. It is sometimes uncapped so your earning capacity is limitless.

Is there good room for progression?

There is really good room for progression in sales. You could start out in a sales support or administrative role and gradually progress to managing your own accounts and then eventually overseeing a team of sales people.

One of the advantages of sales roles is that the skills you develop are really transferable so you could find yourself working for a variety of publishers and selling to a variety of customers. Skilled sales people will always be in demand.

Whilst there aren’t nearly as many customer service roles out there, there is still good room for progression and you could end up managing a team of Customer Service advisors and overseeing the strategy for the department. Like sales, the skills you develop are very transferable and customer service people often find themselves working for a range of organisations.

Do you get to travel?

Sales roles will usually involve some element of travel but the amount will depend largely on the role. You might look after a specific territory, which could be as big as London or the whole of the UK. Some roles can cover regions as large as Europe, the Middle East, Latin America or Asia. International sales people may find they are travelling at least 50% of their time. If you like being out and about, a field based or international sales role would suit you.

On the other hand, some roles are more office based, with most sales being conducted over the phone or via email and only occasional visits to customers being needed. You may find the opportunities to travel increase as you progress into more senior positions.

Customer service roles are usually office based but depending on the company you work for, you may take occasional trips to visit colleagues in other offices, which could be in the UK or overseas.

 

What key skills do you need to succeed?

To succeed in sales you need excellent communication and presentation skills. You need to be results and target driven with a good head for numbers and a knack for negotiating. You also need to be driven, determined and ambitious.

For customer service roles, excellent communication skills are also vital along with the ability to problem solve and empathise with customers.

If you’re considering a sales or customer service role in publishing or already work in the industry and are looking for your next opportunity, contact Olivia at olivia@atwoodtate.co.uk.

 

Atwood Tate recruits across all levels and all functions so if you are looking for a new role in publishing please get in touch with us at info@atwoodtate.co.uk. We also have a very active temps and freelance desk, so if you are open to short term contracts or are looking to boost your freelance career, you can reach Alison at alisonredfearn@atwoodtate.co.uk.

 

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Industry Spotlight: E-learning, Educational and Academic

 

Welcome to Atwood Tate’s industry spotlight series, where we go behind the scenes of each of our recruitment desks to give you the scoop on working with Atwood Tate. Our next entry is with our  fantastic editorial desk, manned by Christina Dimitriadi and Charlotte Tope.

Introduction

Welcome to the busy Editorial Desk where Christina, our Senior Recruitment Consultant and recent addition Charlotte, man the editorial fort. We look after all of the editorial roles that come in, for the Educational, E-learning, Assessment & Testing, Academic, Professional and Trade sectors in London and East Anglia. Pretty much all sectors minus STM, which our lovely consultant Clare Chan takes care off, and B2B which you read about in our last desk spotlight blog (if you missed it you can check it out here).

Today, we are going to focus on the Educational, E-learning and Academic sectors, tell you more about what they are, how they differ and what roles we cover. In a future post we will cover trade and the professional sectors.

Educational Publishing

Educational Publishing is one of the largest sectors of publishing in the UK and it covers the whole spectrum, from curriculum publishers for primary and secondary schools to higher education publishers for university level. Educational publishing is dedicated to the creation and publication of textbooks and curriculum material for schools and higher education institutions. This includes the development of any additional content needed to support the course; such as workbooks, digital software, interactive websites and teacher’s guides. We work with candidates from their first roles up to the latest stages of their career development and positions you will be seeing advertised will range including Editorial Assistants, Project Editors, Commissioning Editors, Managing Editors, Product Managers, Heads of Editorial Content and Publishers.

ELT

A growing division of educational publishing is ELT which stands for English Language Teaching and focuses on the development of print and digital resources for students learning English as a second language. This can be primary school students up to adults learning English for professional or academic purposes. For positions in the ELT editorial sector we will be usually looking for candidates with an excellent command of the English language, very strong editorial skills, and some ELT teaching experience. People coming from a teaching background have a very valuable insight of knowing first-hand which products do or don’t work in the classroom. Any relevant ELT qualification can also be an advantage, such as CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) or DELTA (Diploma in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages).

E-Learning, Assessment and Testing

We also work with a range of publishers and providers of online courses for teaching, research, studying and assessment. This is an exciting aspect of educational publishing that has been rapidly expanding in the digital age and we are seeing more products moving away from the traditional text heavy books or paper products to new and innovative forms of online learning content, interactive courses, modules and assessments. The jobs we cover here would range from traditional editorial roles to Digital Content Developers, Instructional Designers and Product Managers. Our candidates will usually have a solid print or digital publishing or ed-tech background and they would focus on the technical development of the product/course, for example its usability and performance as an educational resource.

Academic Publishing

Academic publishing is intended to communicate the latest research and developments to the academic community. We work with a rage of smaller and larger publishers and societies who publish scholarly journals, books, eBooks, text books and reference works for researchers, students and academic libraries. It is common for universities and museums to publish academic books, aimed particularly at academics and we also work with academic associations, who share information with their members or the public. Depending on the discipline, academic publishing can be split into two sectors, humanities and social sciences (HSS) and scientific, technical and medical (STM). A common term you will hear when applying for academic journals roles is the peer review process, which is a procedure of reviewing and evaluating the quality and validity of articles prior to publication. You can read more about the process here and on the websites of the majority of academic publishers. Common roles you will see us looking for are Editorial Assistants, Publications Editors, Commissioning Editors and Publishers.

 

We hope this blog gives you a good idea of the sectors we work within and what roles we cover. More desk spotlights are scheduled to come so do keep an eye on our website. For more information on editorial roles in educational, e-learning and academic publishing feel free to contact Christina at christina@atwoodtate.co.uk or Charlotte and charlottetope@atwoodtate.co.uk.

Atwood Tate recruits across all levels and all functions so if you are looking for a new role in publishing please get in touch with us at info@atwoodtate.co.uk. We also have a very active temps and freelance desk so of you are open to short term contracts or are looking to boost your freelance career, you can reach Alison at alisonredfearn@atwoodtate.co.uk.

 

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Industry Spotlight: B2B

Welcome to Atwood Tate’s industry spotlight series, where we go behind the scenes of each of our recruitment desks to give you the scoop on working with Atwood Tate. Our next entry is with our  fantastic B2B desk, manned by Karine Nicpon and Julie Irigaray.  Karine and Julie help match B2B clients and candidates across the country, with a variety of roles across a range of business sectors.

What is B2B publishing?

B2B or business-to-business publications are industry focussed and aimed at people in work. They are also called ‘professional’ or ‘trade’ journals (which are different from academic journals, don’t get confused!). An example would be The Bookseller or InPublishing: both are B2B magazines aimed at the publishing industry. There are as many B2B publishing sectors as there are job industries. You will find business publications for lawyers and finance professionals, but also construction workers, nurses, farmers, the list goes on. B2B readerships can be ‘vertical’ (publication is aimed at a specific industry, such as lawyers) or ‘horizontal’ (the audience is spread over many industries, such as PAs). These titles can be weekly, fortnightly, monthly, quarterly etc. in print and/or digital. A lot of B2B publishers also run conferences and events aimed at the industries they cover. Some publishing groups publish both B2B and B2C magazines.

What is the difference between a B2B and a B2C publication?

B2B is aimed at people in a professional capacity whilst B2C publications are consumer magazines made to entertain/inform in a more general capacity (such as fashion magazines or TV listings) or consumer specialist titles about a special interest/hobby (e.g. music, cookery, photography). We need to differentiate these two sectors from customer publishers/content marketing agencies who produce content aimed at customers on behalf of a specific company. Examples include free inflight magazines or supermarket magazines. Some customer publishers have become more specialised and produce print and digital content on behalf of businesses, charities, educational or professional bodies, who might not have an in-house publishing team.

What publishing sectors does Atwood Tate cover?

Atwood Tate is a specialist publishing recruitment agency. We work with publishers across a number of sectors from consumer books (fiction/non-fiction), educational and academic publishing to STM (scientific, technical and medical) publishing.

On the magazine side of things, we mainly focus on B2B publishing and events and also work with information providers. We sometimes do have vacancies across customer/contract publishing as some of our clients do both B2B and custom publishing. But we rarely represent consumer-only publishers, unless their publications are niche/specialist magazines, which we find have a lot of similarities with B2B publishing in terms of skills required to fit a role.

Does B2B publishing automatically mean finance or legal publishing?

Not at all! As mentioned above, B2B publishing can cover any industry. We very often do have roles in financial publishing but we also partner with clients producing content for retail or marketing professionals, GPs, lawyers, optometrists, etc. If you chose to work in B2B publishing, you could end up covering any subject; the possibilities are endless!

What roles can Atwood Tate help with in B2B publishing?

We recruit across all publishing functions from content creation (reporter, features writer, news editor, copy-editor/sub-editor, managing editor, etc.) to production (designer, production editor, production manager) and sales, events or marketing roles. We also have more specialised roles such as market/price reporters or data journalists. And we can even help with IT roles as we have an IT consultant! We recruit for permanent and contract or temp/freelance roles.

For more information about B2B publishing, feel free to contact Karine  at karinenicpon@atwoodtate.co.uk or Julie at JulieIrigaray@atwoodtate.co.uk. For B2B temp/freelance roles, please contact Kellie Millar  at kelliemillar@atwoodtate,co.uk

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Industry Spotlight: Temping

 

 

Welcome to Atwood Tate’s industry spotlight series, where we go behind the scenes of each of our recruitment desks to give you the scoop on working with Atwood Tate. Our first entry is with our wonderful temps and freelancers desk, manned by Kellie Millar and Alison Redfearn. Kellie and Alison help clients not just in London but nationwide, and they work with temps and freelancers at all levels, in all publishing sectors from trade and education to Scientific and academic as well as professional and B2B. They also proudly help and support many interns gain their first paid assignments in publishing. The temps desk is supported by Anna Slevin, who helps with on-boarding new temps, administering holiday pay and dealing with all time sheet or payroll issues.

How can temping benefit my career?

Companies can’t always predict when they’ll need someone. The requirements can come fast and without notice and are urgent. If you’ve been struggling to get a job, through temping, you could actually start working tomorrow.

Due to the urgency of the requirement, sometimes, there isn’t even time for an interview. At most, the client may ask for just a quick, informal phone call so they can ask some relevant questions and gauge a candidate’s answers and then hire. That’s how quick it can be sometimes – you might hear from us on Monday and start working on Tuesday. Sometimes, our temps move directly from one role to another, developing new skills and using the temping experience to further their publishing careers step by step, or even get made permanent! Temps can be booked to cover sick leave, holiday, special projects or to take the pressure off a team whilst they are recruiting for a permanent role – they may even hire you!

What type of job sectors do you cover?

We cover temp and freelance roles across the book, journal and B2B magazine sector as well as  the ever evolving digital publishing and IT technology sectors within Editorial, Marketing, Sales and Production, Product Development, E-Learning as well as Admin and Customer Support.

What type of roles can I get as a temp?

Here is a small sample of roles we have placed!

  • Social Media and Marketing Assistant, Trade Publisher
  • Customer Support Administrator, Magazine Publisher
  • Editorial Assistant (Exams), Educational Publisher
  • Brand and Marketing Executive, Children’s Publisher
  • Production Controller, Arts Publisher
  • Part time Publicity Assistant, Non Fiction
  • Publicity Manager, Fiction Publisher
  • Marketing Executive, Scientific Publisher
  • Legislation Editor, Legal publisher
  • Freelance Sub Editor, B2B publisher

How would I get paid?

Temps are added to Atwood Tate’s payroll and get paid on a weekly basis, on an hourly rate. We use online timesheets for you to record your hours, which your manager approves. Temps also accrue holiday pay and can also opt into pensions too. Payments are paid directly into your bank account each Friday, just in time for the weekend!

What if I want to go permanent?

Temping can be an excellent route to finding a permanent role in publishing. You can treat the temporary assignment like a working interview and network with your team and various departments to learn about roles that may be coming up. There is the possibility while you are temping to be offered a permanent role. You can also apply for any internal roles you see being advertised. The beauty of temping is the variety, the opportunity to explore. More senior candidates also enjoy the flexibility that temping or freelancing offers. For those of you starting out, you can build up your admin and publishing experience and even if you don’t go temp to perm through your temp assignment, the experience gained and added to your growing CV, will put you in good stead for applying for future permanent roles.

For more information about temping or freelancing do feel free to contact us via Atwood Tate’s “Meet the team” page or to apply for temp and freelancer roles visit our job pages 

 

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