Tag Archives: academic publishing

Companies: Why You Should Consider Temps

Why You Should Consider Temps

Companies: Why You Should Consider Temps

Our articles on temping have typically been to inform candidates of the many benefits that come with temping, both professionally and personally. But today, we’d like to point out the many reasons why temping is such a useful avenue for clients to consider.

  • The flexibility of temps also means company flexibility.

If you’re expanding your team but you’re not quite prepared to hire a permanent person, a temporary employee is a great way to establish exactly what it is you need in terms of additional resources. Maybe you’ve never had extra hands on deck and you’re only now starting to realise the new objectives you can tackle. A temp-to-perm scenario can be a match made in heaven for company and employee alike. As someone grows into a newly created role and reveals the kind of results that can be produced with more staff. The manager can then take these results to HR as Exhibit A on what expanding the team can mean for everyone.

But more than that,

  • Temps bring their own expertise with them.

They don’t need to be entry-level candidates acting as a stop-gap. By hiring consultants or veteran freelancers, a company also gets to avail of a temporary worker’s own experiences, the different business practices they’ve witnessed in their time. New blood often means new ideas and even if the worker doesn’t stick around, their contributions can last forever.

And, of course,

  • Temporary workers can provide much needed breathing space to permanent employees.

When the day-to-day administration is taken off their hands, they’re able to concentrate on the bigger picture and implement the projects. This improve service and streamline practices. You can get a lot done when you don’t have to sweat the small stuff. Even if it’s only for a little while.

So, for anyone who’s currently reviewing team numbers or work-loads, don’t commit until you know for sure exactly what you need – try a temp today! Get in touch with Kellie Millar, who manages our Temps and Freelancers desk, or her colleague, Alison Redfearn, and they can send you more workers than you can shake a stick at!

5 reasons to get a temp:

  • Cover sick leave
  • Cover holiday
  • Help with a project
  • Flexibility – have for 1 day / 1 week / 1 month…
  • No admin – we cover all payment, NI, holiday pay, pension

Kellie Millar
E: kelliemillar@atwoodtate.co.uk
Tel: 02070347897

Alison Redfearn
E: alisonredfearn@atwoodtate.co.uk
Tel: 02070347922

You can also contact us with any questions via our social media pages: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Creating the Future of Academic Publishing

Creating the Future of Academic Publishing

On the 23rd of January our consultant Christina will be attending: Creating the Future of Academic Publishing: Strengthening the Research Ecosystem.

A conference in London as part of Academic Book Week and created by Emerald Publishing. The event is a chance to discuss academic publishing and reignite the old debates around the sector of publishing. The attendees will be reviewing the last five years of publishing and discussing the merges within publishing that have been going on!

It is sure to be a  very interesting evening and we’re looking forward to hearing the feedback and ideas that are discussed.

Are you going? You can book your tickets on Eventbrite, here.

Let us know if you’re attending or come and say hello to Christina when you’re there! You can contact us via any of our social media accounts: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Museum & Cultural Publishing: an evening with OPuS

 

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Last Thursday, OPuS held an event to discuss Museum and Cultural Publishing. The speakers were Declan McCarthy (Ashmolean Museum), Samuel Fanous (The Bodleian Library) and Katie Bond (National Trust). John Hudson (Historic England) was the Chair.

The publishing and retail scene in museums, galleries and the heritage sector has been resilient during the recent unsettled years in publishing, and is a significant component of the wider cultural sector which is one of our national success stories. Within the sector, books are published on a variety of models – on a fully commercial basis or one of cost recovery, or in some cases conscious subsidy as part of a wider agenda. In this session, publishers from the National Trust, The Bodleian Library and the Ashmolean Museum, all based locally, describe their business and the particular characteristics of the cultural publishing sector.

 

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Things learnt:

  • Lots of cultural publishers are members of ACE: The Association of Cultural Enterprises
  • The Ashmolean publishing programme focuses on event catalogs, tied to the 3-5 exhibitions the museum holds each year. These differ from general trade books in that the sales are tied very strongly to the actual exhibition, and any sales beyond a show are a bonus.
  • For the Ashmolean, business is still very focused around producing beautiful, physical books. E-books, apps, and other digital forms do exist and are continually looked into, but at the moment they are not viable revenue generators.
  • Whilst the Bodleian has always published, the current publishing programme is still very new and has been grown gradually and carefully.
  • Public engagement is fundamental to the continued survival of cultural institution, and a publishing programme is a useful tool for this.
  • The Bodleian has several different approaches it takes when publishing titles: 1) doing a direct facsimile edition of an out-of-print book, 2) repackaging material in a new format, 3) publishing newly authored titles (that often use illustrations and source material from the collections), 4) gift-books to bring in a new audience of non-scholars.
  • The National Trust has over 200 shops – that is more nationally than Waterstones – and around 50% of their book revenues come from sales in those shops. The other 50% is primarily from sales in the UK trade. Like the Ashmolean, most of their sales are print, with digital and ebooks having more presence overseas.
  • Along with the annual Handbook that goes to all National Trust members, and the individual property guidebooks which are done in-house, they also publishing specialist books, illustrated narrative non-fiction, and children’s books. These are published in partnership with Nosy Crows, Pavilion, and Faber & Faber.
  • A book that sells well in the Trade does not (always) sell well in the gift-shops, and vice versa. Katie has learnt that the more a book is embedded in the organisation and ties back to their core message, the better it does.
  • The Children’s market is challenging, nostalgic, brand driven, infuriating, hard to break in to, but with massive talent, potential, and hugely rewarding.
  • As an editor you may come across challenges from elsewhere in your organisation about why you commissioned a particular title from a particular author. You need to know what you are publishing and why, and don’t be afraid to stick to your guns if it is important. That is the editors job!

All in all, it was a fascinating evening learning about a sector of the industry many of us are not aware of. The main lesson I learned was that publishing in the heritage sector requires a thorough understanding of the requirements of your market, a deep appreciation for the uniqueness of your source material (be that a museum, a library collection, or several hundred distinct properties around the country), a creative mind to see the new potential, and the willingness to take a risk on something that hasn’t been done before.

Let us know your thoughts on the event, on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn! Or tag us in your photos on Instagram!

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ALPSP Conference 2016

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Three weeks ago Claire and I attended the annual ALPSP conference, which brings together a large number of scholarly and professional publishing professionals from across the UK and overseas. The conference was hosted over three days (14-16th September) and delegates were treated to a packed schedule of presentations, panel discussions and networking opportunities.

The key discussion points at the conference were:

  • The disruption caused by digital developments, which affect the publishing industry as a whole, and how companies can future proof their brands and products. We should let technology lead, not disrupt.
  • Metrics and the ever-expanding range available. How can Metrics be used to measure publication performance as well as other research outputs and activities. What is the future of research evaluation?
  • The evolution of peer review and its relevance today. How can peer review be used effectively in different communities, if at all. How is peer review used outside of scientific publications and what specifics should it address.
  • The data revolution and the implications this has. Publishers can’t solely be content businesses. They need to be innovative and become technology companies to stay relevant.

On the second night of the conference the ALPSP Awards were hosted. The Award for Contribution to Scholarly Publishing was given to Alice Meadows, Director of Community Engagement and Support at ORCID. Awards for Innovation were given to Cartoon Abstracts by Taylor & Francis and Wiley ChemPlanner.

alpsp-winners

The ALPSP Winners – Image attributed to ALPSP – http://alpsp.org/ALPSP-Awards

You can download the full conference programme and view the video footage at http://www.alpsp.org/2016-Programme.

Next year’s conference is being hosted in the Netherlands. We’ll see you there!

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Welcome to the team Lisa!

We are excited to welcome Lisa – the newest member of the Atwood Tate team!

Lisa Smars

Lisa Photo

After completing her MA in Publishing at Oxford Brookes,  Lisa spent two years working in the Children’s and Educational Rights team at Oxford University Press.

She has recently joined Atwood Tate as a Publishing Recruitment Consultant and will be based in our Oxford office. She’ll be mainly focusing on Academic, Professional, and STM roles outside of the London region, but don’t hesitate to drop her a line if you are interested in publishing roles in general as she can always put you in contact with another member of the team.

lisasmars@atwoodtate.co.uk

01865 339 529

 

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Scholarly Social with FuturePub – New Developments in Scientific Collaboration Tech

I wanted to tell you about an event I went to recently that’s definitely worth looking out for. They have regular, very well organised events usually including pizza and drinks!

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Scholarly Social is a social networking group for people involved in scholarly communication (including publishers, librarians, researchers, consultants, intermediaries, and students).  They’ve linked up with FuturePub (from Overleaf) to bring us Futurepub7 – an hour of 5-minute talks themed around the future of scientific publishing.

Here’s the basic list of 7 speakers and topics but lots more detail can be found here:

  1. Reimagining scientific news: How user research led to an entire product redesign, by Sybil Wong and Mimi Keshani
  2. Publishing Research Ideas and Outcomes, by Ross Mounce
  3. Peercog: Peer-to-peer recognition from author to reviewer, by Laura Harvey
  4. Peer to Peer Science, by James Littlejohn
  5. Automating peer review for research, by Daniel Shanahan
  6. Peerwith – connecting experts, by Joris van Rossum
  7. Citizen Science, Open Science & scientific publication, by Muki Haklay

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Keep an eye out for future events and join the LinkedIn group or follow them on Twitter.

Scholarly Social

@ScholarlySocial

#ScholarlySocial

Overleaf

@overleaf

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ALPSP Conference 2015

It was my 3rd time at the annual ALPSP Conference (9-11 September) and as usual, it was a great opportunity to catch up with lots of people (both our candidates and clients) and hear the latest thoughts from scholarly publishers worldwide.

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If you weren’t able to get there, I’m not going to summarise all the sessions I attended as the lovely team at ALPSP has done a superb job of adding audio and slides to their Conference Programme, which means you can have a look yourself! (Thanks Suzanne, Audrey, Lesley, Dee and Sabia)

Sessions I thought particularly of interest:

Smart ways for small publishers to go global: Peter Richardson, Managing Director, British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery told us the answer lies in strategic partnerships with other organisations and talked through pros and cons of outsourcing and maintaining editorial control.

ALPSP2

Have I got standards for you? chaired by Laura Cox: we had some interesting perspectives from a small publisher perspective with Leighton Chipperfield, Director of Publishing and Income Diversification, Society for General Microbiology and the other end of the scale with Laird Barrett, Senior Digital Product Manager (Journals), Taylor & Francis outlining how they implement publishing standards.

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There are also some very good blogs to read up on and loads more info on twitter #alpsp15

I thought I’d list the finalists for their Awards for Innovation in Publishing – the winner was Kudos.
Bookmetrix from Altmetric and Springer SBM
CHORUS – advancing public access to research
eLife Lens open-source reading tool from eLife
Impact Vizor from HighWire Press
JSTOR Daily online magazine
Kudos toolkit for researchers and their publishers
Overleaf authorship tool
RightFind XML for Mining from the Copyright Clearance Center
The Xvolution board game from NSTDA

More info about the winners: http://www.alpsp.org/Ebusiness/AboutALPSP/ALPSPAwards.aspx

 

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Scholarly Social

Alison and I headed over to King’s Cross on 19th May for the latest instalment of Scholarly Social.  It was our first time at this event and we’d really recommend it to anyone working in and around academic / STM publishing.  It was a really well organised (and free!) event with a great range of speakers plus the chance to network with your peers.

As they say, it’s ‘an open and collaborative space to share ideas and make connections. We host social gatherings where you can make new connections with people involved in scholarly communication or catch up with old friends.  You don’t represent your organisation, just your individual self, and everyone connected to scholarly communication is welcome, including publishers, librarians, researchers, consultants, intermediaries, and students.’

This event was in association with #futurepub (from Overleaf) who have hosted #futurepub 5 as part of the Pint of Science Festival.  We had the pleasure of 6 x 5 minute talks from mainly start-up companies focussed on the future of scientific publishing.

Thanks to Bernie FolanGinny Hendricks for organising. Contact Scholarly Social

Speakers were:

Eva Amsen, Community Strategy Manager for Faculty of 1000

F1000 has just launched F1000Workspace, where researchers can collect, cite and discuss scientific literature with their colleagues.

James Harwood, Co-founder of Penelope (automated manuscript screening)

Penelope is an automated tool that helps authors improve their work before submitting to a journal. Penelope scans manuscripts for common reporting errors and suggests improvements along with links to relevant resources. In doing so, she makes sure that all manuscripts meet journal standards before landing on an editor’s desk.

Richard Smith, founder of Nowomics

The new Nowomics website allows scientists to ‘follow’ biological terms to create a personalised news feed of new papers. With inline abstracts, search and altmetrics it aims to make content discovery simpler than sifting through email alerts and tables of contents.

Nowomics

Sabine Louët, founder of SciencePOD (raising the profile of research, via on-demand popular science articles)

SciencePOD delivers Science Prose On-Demand by translating complex scientific ideas into articles written in an accessible language. It then publishes this high-quality content in a slick magazine format and distributes it widely.

Science pod

Karl Ward, principal engineer at CrossRef (CrossRef’s REST API: All-you-can-eat Scholarly Metadata)

CrossRef’s REST API provides free and open search of metadata covering over 70 million journal articles, books and conference proceedings. Find out how anyone can build services using CrossRef’s metadata, including basic bibliographic information, funding, award and license data for published works and more.

Cross ref

Giorgos Georgopoulos – product, delivery, and business development at Futurescaper

Futurescaper is a tool that connects people’s thinking on complex issues, and is being used to help coordinate teams of researchers working on long-term, multi-author projects. We were given an example of how a team of analysts used Futurescaper to make sense of 300+ citations, collected over 3 months by 24 environmental researchers, in just a day.

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London Book Fair (part 2)

general lbf view
A view down onto the main Hall

Catherine
It’s hard to believe LBF is over again for another year! It was a great fair and the 3 days flew by. Being at London Olympia was a new experience and I definitely liked the new venue. It was so light and it was great to be able to look out over the halls from the balconies and see all of the hustle and bustle of the fair. It’s hard to pinpoint exactly what my favourite thing was this year as I can honestly say I enjoyed all of it. It is always so great being at the book fair and seeing everyone and I’m already looking forward to LBF 2016!

Claire Louise
I always enjoy LBF and this year was no exception – it is three days jam-packed with people all passionate about the publishing industry, catching up with old friends, meeting new people, and going to some interesting seminars. One in particular was “Including the Excluded, chaired by Beth Cox and Alexandra Strick from Inclusive Minds (who we interviewed a little while ago). It was really inspiring to see that many in the Children’s book industry are starting to take positive steps to make more diverse and inclusive titles.

Beatrice and Susan are the B2B team at Atwood Tate.
We found the atmosphere and the variety of different exhibitors quite fascinating – for instance, the exhibitions on the luxury travel book stands couldn’t be more different from the type of B2B magazine we usually work on! We thoroughly enjoyed our afternoon at the LBF.

Alison
There were some really interesting seminars on offer at LBF this year. I attended one called ‘Creativity, Coding and Commercial Savvy – fusion skills for a future in publishing’. This discussion focused on the growing importance of digital technology and how creative, technical and entrepreneurial skills are the key to the success of UK publishing. It was fascinating to learn about how coding can be a solution to problems and provide a unique advantage. It was also great to hear the story of Emma Barnes; founder of Snowbooks and how she created the award winning Bibliocloud system. A key point was that coding is nothing to be daunted by and it is just another language. There was also an important message about creativity and I came away feeling inspired to always take a fresh approach to work each day and to aim to think outside of the box as this can be the key to success.

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London Book Fair 2015 (part 1)

Now we’ve all had a chance to catch our breaths and get our voices back (unlike Helen I did lose mine again this year!), the Team wanted to share some of our favourite bits of the Fair. Claire, Helen, and Katie are up first. The rest of the team will be follow shortly!

View of our stand and banner
Our stand in the Tech zone had a good view over the bustling main Hall and all the stands below

Claire
It was another superb book fair – for me LBF is the highlight of the year. It gives us a chance to catch up with lots of candidates and clients and it’s a rare opportunity to see many of the different sectors we work with under one roof. Saying that the new venue took about 3 days wandering around before I got my bearings again, despite having been several times when it used to be at Olympia. I loved having our booth in the Ivy Club bar, it was an oasis of calm and a great place for our more private meetings. Just need to finish the follow up now…
Claire in the Ivy club
Claire enjoying our booth in the Ivy Club bar

Helen
London Book Fair this year reminded me of my first ever LBF at Olympia, before the move to Earls Court via Excel. I felt quite nostalgic to begin with (not least because I bumped into my MA dissertation supervisor who I hadn’t seen for over 11 years) but so much in the world of publishing has changed since the event was last at Olympia and the atmosphere certainly wasn’t jaded or dated.

I didn’t lose my voice this year, which was a minor miracle given the amount of talking I managed to fit in. There was general catching up and more specific conversations about the state of the market and helping employees to develop relevant skills for a changing industry. Perhaps unsurprisingly, consumer insight and market analysis was one of the more common topics of discussion. Overall, I came away with the impression that publishing has come to terms with the new order of things and seems to be in a positive and innovative phase of growth.

In between meetings I managed to have a quick wander through the buzzing halls and narrowly missed a photo opportunity with Conchita Wurst. I didn’t quite muster the courage to sit on the giant sofa in the Tech area and that is something I regret. So my one plea to the organisers for next year is please, please bring back the giant sofa and I will overcome my shyness and sit on it.

Katie
This was my first London Book Fair and I was pretty blown away by the sheer size and scale of the operation. I thought the venue was lovely – very light and airy – and the staff were really helpful when we were setting up our stand. It was interesting to meet people from various parts of the industry, and to get a feel for the huge variety of products on offer.

Lynne and Claire
Lynne and Claire at LBF 2015

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