Tag Archives: advice

Advertising Salary on Publishing Roles

Advertising Salary on Publishing Roles

Recently, there has been some discussion online about a lack of transparency in publishing recruitment in regards to agencies (and publishers) not disclosing the salaries on job adverts.

‘Available on request’?

At Atwood Tate, we disclose salary information on advertisements where we are permitted, but much of the time our clients ask us to keep this information confidential until point of enquiry.  There are a variety of reasons why employers wish to keep salary confidential or as “available on application”.  It can be because they wish to remain flexible or to maintain confidentiality across the company.  Other employees who are in similar roles may not be keen for their salary banding to be public knowledge.

We understand that this may make things seem a little more difficult for job seekers, but, although we are often not permitted to disclose the salary on the advert itself, for the vacancies we are working on we will always be happy to disclose information about the salary of the role if you are registered with us or send us your CV when you enquire about the position.

Salary advice before submission

We will always be clear on the salary range available for a job before we agree with you to submit your application.  You will have the opportunity to state your desired salary, so that expectations on this issue are managed on both sides from the outset.

In most cases, we will be able to provide greater detail than is supplied on the advert and this ensures no candidate arrives at an interview only to discover that the salary offered for a job does not meet their requirements. We are here to help on that front and can add a level of insight and transparency.

Call our Consultants

Don’t be shy of calling a telephone number on an advert for more information about the salary level. In some cases the advertiser may not be able to give you an exact figure, but in those cases, we would advise that you give the hiring manager or recruiter an idea of the salary that you would be looking for and they should be able to tell you if the position advertised would be in line with that.

At Atwood Tate, we are all for transparency and we will do our best to provide as much relevant information as possible when guiding you through the application process.

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SYP Panel Talk: “How to assert yourself in publishing”

SYP Panel Talk: “How to assert yourself in publishing”

On Tuesday night, I went to my first SYP event, which was a panel talk on “How to assert yourself in publishing”. On the panel were: Roly Allen (@roly_allen) a Publisher at Ilex, part of Hachette UK,  Bryony Woods (@BryonyWoods)  Literary Agent at Diamond Khan and Woods,  Ailah Ahmed (@ailahahmed), Commissioning Editor at Little, Brown, part of Hachette UK, and Pinelopi Pourpoutidou, Head of Foreign & Digital Sales at Michael O’Mara Publishing.

Discussion ranged from topics such as knowing when it is time to speak up in meetings, what confidence is, and whether maternity-leave affects career progression, and what can be done to change this. Here are 7 of the top tips to take away from the evening.

 

On Applications…

1. Keep your cover letters short and specific to the job

Cover letters do not need be very long. Half a side of A4 will suffice. Make it short and sharp and to the point. Outline your key skills and how they make you suitable for the requirements of the role. Investigate the company, know what they do. Say why you want to work for them and why they should want you to work for them.

2. Sell yourself in your interests.

The interests section in your CV is your chance to sell yourself, and gives the company an idea of you as a real person. Be honest, but also be professional. Do you play sports, play in a band, part of an activity/ interest club, been travelling? Make sure you share!

 

On Confidence…

3. Fake it till you make it

Few people can start in a role and have complete confidence right away. It is learnt over time as you acclimatise to the role. Being nervous as you start out is normal, but if you are not confident, you can just pretend you are. The panel suggested Amy Cuddy’s method of ‘Fake it Till You Make It”. Watch her TED Talk on it here: https://www.ted.com/talks/amy_cuddy_your_body_language_shapes_who_you_are

The panel also suggested Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg as a resource particularly for women with tips and advice on how to build confidence and how to be a successful leader in the workplace.

 4. Loudness isn’t confidence- knowing what you’re talking about is.

Don’t think that you will come across as confident just by talking louder and being brash and confrontational. Being quieter and more introverted doesn’t mean that you are less effective or less valuable. What is important is preparing your facts before you talk and share. An idea that you have investigated and can support with facts and realistic costings is much more useful than something unprepared, said loudly.

5. Form a support network, even if just an informal one.

One tip suggested, especially to benefit people from minorities with less representation in the industry, was to form a support network with people in the industry who have come from a similar background. Either in your company, or out wider out into the industry; find someone or a group of people who are at a similar stage to you, and people you feel you can confide in, and ask advice from, who you can meet up with once a month over a coffee.

6. Don’t be afraid of speaking up in meetings, but know when to stop.

If you have an idea that is relevant, share it. But if you are told it will not work, then know when to stop.

 

On Asking for More…

7. When to ask for a pay rise

The panel suggested that you should perhaps start thinking about asking for a pay rise after a year into a role. An employer should not think less of you for asking, and the worst that they can say is no. If they do reject your request, ask if you can review this decision in 3 to 6 months. They suggested that you should pick your time to ask also based on what the situation of both you and your company are. If the company is making cut backs, it might not be the correct time to ask. But if you have had a period of success (as opposed to just one success), then you should ask. Your request should make a case for your worth to the company, and why you deserve this rise.

 

This was a fascinating talk, and all the speakers were enthusiastic and entertaining. Thanks to the speakers and The SYP for hosting the event!

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What I’ve Learnt from working at Atwood Tate as Administrator & Social Media Coordinator

Working at Atwood Tate
What I’ve Learnt working as Administrator & Social Media Coordinator at Atwood Tate

In July 2016 I joined Atwood Tate as a maternity cover Administrator. In October I was made permanent as the Administrator and Social Media Coordinator. Sadly I am now leaving the company which I have absolutely loved working for, for an exciting opportunity working as a Marketing and Publicity Executive at a Trade publishing house.

As Administrator, and later Social Media Coordinator, I have learnt a lot during my time at Atwood Tate! From the different publishing sectors to the true cost of London commuting!

Upon leaving University in May 2016 I hectically began applying for numerous jobs and work experience placements within publishing and had first-hand experience of the difficulty of breaking into this industry.

Publishing is an increasingly competitive world to enter into and often candidates requires a lot of experience to get an entry-level job. With work experience placements often over-subscribed and most not covering more than expenses, it was sometimes difficult to add extra work experience to my CV. Instead I developed my skills within blogging, social media and coding which eventually led to me gaining a few interviews.

If you want to learn more about how blogging, YouTubing and Coding/HTML can help make your CV’s stand out take a look at our blog posts on these subjects!

I was lucky enough to come across a vacancy at Atwood Tate and attended an interview for the role. I was later offered the position of Administrator and jumped at the opportunity to be working within the publishing industry on the recruitment side of things.

Working in recruitment is a great way to learn about the industry and to network with a lot of people working within it.

Ultimately, I’ve decided to return to my roots within publishing, but during my time at Atwood Tate I have learnt many things about this industry and have had a great time doing so:

What I’ve Learnt Working at Atwood Tate:

  • There are more sectors in publishing that just Trade, Academic and Educational. This includes: B2B (Business to Business), STM (Science Technical and Medical) and Professional publishing. These sectors are just as exciting as the three I knew about prior to joining, and are a great place to build experience and learn more about publishing.
  • Also, there are a lot more roles within publishing than just editorial. A lot of people are looking to enter Editorial positions when they first apply for publishing roles, but Publicity, Sales, Rights and many other job roles are just as engrossing and immersive within the industry
  • Recruitment Companies, such as Atwood Tate, are a great resource for job-hunters, both experienced and entry-level. Even if Atwood Tate have no available roles for entry-level candidates we have created resources for entry-level candidates across our social media and on our website. This includes fortnightly Q&As, a work experience resources page, quick email responses to inquiries and regular helpful blog posts on job applications, temping and skills development.
  • Publishing Recruitment is just as immersive as working in a publishing house. When I first joined Atwood Tate I wanted to meet people within publishing, and develop my networking abilities. Since starting I have gone to numerous Society of Young Publishers event, attended the London Book Fair and LBF seminars, gone to the Borough Book Bash and generally communicated with publishing houses and publishers via our Social Media accounts
  • And last but not least, one of the best things I’ve learnt from working at Atwood Tate: helping people to find a job within publishing is a fantastic feeling.

Not only have I met some great people outside of the office but I have also made some fantastic friends within the company as well – mostly from bringing in copious amounts of cake!

One of the best bits of feedback we can receive from candidates and clients alike is about how friendly they find the staff at Atwood Tate, and it’s true! I may be biased but the main aim of everyone at Atwood Tate is to get our candidates their dream jobs, and clients their dream employees. And to give advice during the times that we’re waiting for those jobs to come in.

I’m leaving Atwood Tate in the full knowledge that if I ever need a new job in future I will be in safe hands when coming to them.

I also leave behind our new social media which I have had the great responsibility and joy of developing, including our YouTube Channel and Instagram. I leave this in the capable hands of our new Administrator and Social Media Coordinator: Andrew Willis.

You’ll be hearing more about Andrew in the coming week! So watch out for that.

For now I leave Atwood Tate with huge thanks for the wonderful opportunities and experiences I have had. And best of luck to our new Administrator Andrew, who’s going to do a wonderful job!

 

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BookTube 101: An evening with Sanne Vliegenthart & BookMachine

BookTube 101

BookTube 101

On Wednesday our Administrator and Social Media Coordinator Ellie attended the BookMachine’s event: BookTube 101.

BookTube is the name given to the community of book vloggers on YouTube (channels dedicated to the discussion of books) and booktubers are the given name of the vloggers that run these channels.

One such booktuber is Sanne Vliegenthart, of BooksandQuills, who was the guest host of the event. She came to discuss the relevance of BookTube to the publishing industry and how she has developed her own BookTube channel and career.

Starting out in 2008 Sanne created her channel BooksandQuills to discuss things she was interested in. At the time she was studying for an English Literature degree, so she wanted to discuss what she was reading. Sanne also covered other topics, as BookTube was not officially a ‘thing’ until around 2011.

In 2009 she began to focus more heavily on books when she took part in the 50 Book Challenge, a challenge to read 50 books in one year. Audiences were responsive to her videos documenting her progress, and she found her subscribers growing due to the challenges popularity.

Now, in 2017, her channel has over 160,000 subscribers, 11 million views and she has created over 600 videos since 2008.

BookTube & Publishing

Sanne links her successful BookTube channel to her getting a career in publishing. She currently works as the Social Media producer for Penguin Random House, and she previously worked for Hot Key Books, an imprint of Bonnier, as Digital and Social Media Manager.

With social media being a part of our everyday lives and new jobs within publishing being created specifically to accommodate and utilise it, a background in booktubing and blogging are a growing way to break into the publishing industry. You can read our post on using blogging to get into publishing here.

Along with discussing the benefits of booktubing on her career development, Sanne also discussed the relevance of BookTube to publishers looking to develop their marketing, sales and publicity approaches.

For most booktubers in Britain, booktubing is a hobby that is done alongside a full-time job or education. Out of the close community of booktubers Sanne is a part of, none of them are professional full-time YouTubers. But many of them do have links to the publishing community.

Some are social media producers at other publishing houses, others are writers, booksellers, freelance editors, marketing assistants and more.

BookTube & Publicity

Sanne then discussed how BookTube can help publishing companies publicise books and journals, similarly, if not more so, than blogs and blog tours.

  • YouTube videos often create more comments and discussions than blog posts do.
  • They can last longer than a blog post – imagine writing a 10 minute video into a cohesive blog post.
  • It’s easy to share content and they’re visually appealing
  • Subscribers of booktubers can develop a personal connection with the booktuber, through reading tastes, professionalism and consistency of posting.

BookTube & Sales

As an example, Sanne has procured, roughly, £45,000 for the publishing industry, selling books through an affiliate link to the Book Depository.

She pointed out that this figure is from one affiliate link only. She cannot monitor the amount her subscribers are spending buying books from her recommendations in shops, online or via subscriptions to websites such as Audible.

The topic turned from how booktubers can help to how they should be approached. Since booktubing is a hobby most booktubers will only read and discuss books that they themselves want to read. Sometimes they are sent books and publicity materials from publishers, but rarely accept anything unsolicited. Often publishers will request to send a book to a booktuber, but there is no requirement that they discuss the book on their channel unless they want to.

It is clear from Sanne’s channel and statistics alone that BookTube is incredibly popular and a worthwhile consideration to the development of the publishing industry.

Our YouTube Channel

We are very interested in the topic of BookTube and hearing some tips for starting a channel from Sanne, as we ourselves have a YouTube channel. So far we have created videos on topics such as How to get a Job Interview in PublishingHow to get into Academic Publishing and shared a vlog of our time at the London Book Fair 2017, among others. We’ve recognised the potential of YouTube for the publishing industry and are utilising it for recruitment.

We want to say a big thank you to BookMachine for holding the event, and to Sanne for hosting! Ellie had a great time!

For more information contact us on any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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How to use LinkedIn to get a Job

LinkedIn

How to use LinkedIn to get a Job

LinkedIn is a professional social media site, with over 225 million users, which is a great place to start when beginning a job search.

Whilst not social in the sense of funny meme sharing and night out gossip, is a great way to socialise and network with potential employers and recruiters. It is also a great hub for learning more about different industries and networking.

If you attend an event, for example the London Book Fair, and meet a publishing professional in the queue of a café, get their name and link up with them afterwards. You never know where a future encounter might take you, and having a LinkedIn account can make it so much easier!

As such, the first step is to create a LinkedIn account!

Whether you’re looking for an apprenticeship, internship, part-time, temporary or permanent role, having a LinkedIn account can be really beneficial.

Not only can you create your own LinkedIn account for people to find, you can also follow other people’s accounts and company profiles. Such as our own: Atwood Tate.

We regularly post our latest jobs, competitions, blogs, and industry news on our account so it is worth following! You can also follow our recruitment consultants and have a one-to-one way of communicating and access to their latest jobs in their sector of job type.

For example: Karine Nicpon handles Editorial roles in B2B and will post these jobs to her LinkedIn account.

But firstly, you need your own account.

Here are some simple tips on how to make your account as professional as possible and use LinkedIn to get a job:

  • Make sure your profile photo is clear and professional. Do not upload a picture of yourself on your latest night out or of striking a silly pose. Use a photo that shows your whole face, is un-blurred and looks professional but approachable.
  • Add your experience – LinkedIn is more social than a CV so you don’t have to be as thoroughly detailed or structured, you can describe your roles with simple bullet points or a brief description. You can also write in first person rather than third.
  • Use keywords – some recruiters search by specific words, for example we search for the keyword Publishing and, depending on roles we have in, editorial or publishing sales etc. But you can also include keywords like office experience, languages, B2B, admin experience etc
  • Fill out everything! If you have volunteer experience, however small, add it, along with any accomplishments you are proud of and any skills or hobbies that you have.
  • Include your contact details – these will only be available to people that you accept as followers, but a recruiter will need them to get in contact with you about potential jobs.
  • Upload a CV! As a recruiter this is really important to us, as this will hold more details on your education, background and specific skills. It is also what a recruiter will need for when they later put you forward for jobs!

Once you have made your LinkedIn account as professional as possible you can follow people!

Companies:

  • Follow companies you are interested in for information on their business, where they’re based, their company size and any jobs that they are advertising.
  • Follow the companies that you have worked for in the past, however small. Link them to your work experience categories to give more information to future employees!
  • Follow recruitment companies for information on their latest jobs! You can see our current jobs on LinkedIn here.

Contacts:

  • Contact friends, colleagues and family to link up as contacts. Not only can you stay in touch (it is a social network after all) but you can also endorse each other’s skills! This lets companies/recruiters know that you’re telling the truth when you say you have experience in HTML, French and Networking, for example.
  • Follow old colleagues and tutors/teachers for potential referrals for future jobs. The more contacts you have the better.
  • Follow recruitment consultants or HR recruiters at potential companies you would like to work for. They might get in touch directly in future.

Now you’ve created your profile and linked up with people you can start applying for roles advertised on companies LinkedIn pages. You can even search for potential roles in the search bar and get job alerts to let you know when a job fitting your preferences and previous job searches becomes available.

We hope that this post helps you with your job search! And we hope that you’ll come and follow us on our LinkedIn account for more details and news on all our latest jobs, our business and industry news. You can also follow us on our other social media accounts: Twitter, Facebook, YouTube or Instagram.

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Things to Bring to the London Book Fair 2017

Things to Bring to the London Book Fair 2017

Things to Bring to the London Book Fair 2017

The London Book Fair 2017 is fast approaching! It’s only 2 weeks away! And it’s time to get prepared.

Whether you are a publisher, a candidate, an author or a reader you need to remember to bring certain things to the London Book Fair. Not only your ticket but items which will make your day much more enjoyable!

Remember to bring:

Tickets:

Your CV:

  • We are the only recruitment company attending the fair with a stand, come say hello at: stand 3B26 (in Tech). We are also taking part in the Careers Clinic on the Thursday. Bring your CV to talk to help you talk to one of our consultants and to show at the Career’s Clinic. We may even take a copy of your CV, so print more than one – but don’t bring a folder. The majority of the people at the LBF are there to make deals with other publishers, not to recruit. Network with publishers at stands, but don’t force your CV on them. Instead offer…

Business Cards:

  • If you’re an author, candidate or a client and have a business card, be sure to bring them. People don’t have that much time to stop and chat at the fair, so give them a business card with details on how to get in touch.  This is a great way to get noticed and remembered.

Camera:

  • Take some photos of the event! Whether to share on social media or simply to keep track of companies you are interested in. The London Book Fair is a social event as much as an industry one, so why not take a few snaps.

Comfortable Shoes:

  • Do not underestimate the size of the Olympia – where the LBF takes place. The floors are crowded with people, stands and cafes. You will need to walk everywhere so make sure you’ve got comfortable shoes.

Bottle of Water:

  • Water is imperative at events like these. You will be walking a lot in large crowds and the queues for the café get astronomical by lunch time. Be sure to bring some water with you to stay hydrated and comfortable all day.

Notebook:

  • If you’re attending an event, be it a seminar, an author event or the Careers Clinic, so bring a notebook with you. Taking notes is encouraged. There’s a lot to remember and a lot to see. Keep track of all of it to stay informed.

Phone:

  • If you’re meeting people you will need to communicate to find them, as shouting across the hall will not work. You can also use your phone to live-tweet and follow the London Book Fair  twitter account and the official Book Fair hashtag #LBF17! People will be live-tweeting all day! Following the events on twitter is a great way to keep track of events and new throughout the day.

Make sure you keep note of these things to make the most of your attendance at the London Book Fair.

Have you bought your tickets yet? Printed off your map? Finalised which Seminars you want to attend? Found out where the seminars are and what time they start?

Visit the website for more details! And feel free to contact us on any of our social media with your questions: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Types of Sales Roles in B2B Publishing

Types of Sales Roles B2B

Types of Sales Roles in B2B Publishing

There are many different types of sales roles within publishing. It is worth asking what type of sales role you are applying for, and highlighting which type you’ve done on your CV, when applying for a job.

Our Sales Consultant in the London office, Olivia, has put together a list of the key types of sales roles to explain further.

The key types are:

  • Delegate – selling delegate spaces (i.e. tickets) to attend events and conferences
  • Sponsorship – selling sponsorship opportunities for events. It can also refer to sponsored editorial content, which is when companies pay to publish an article in your publication as a way of promoting their own brand.
  • Advertising – selling advertising space. Can be either print (e.g. a print publication or magazine) or online (eg. a website). It can also be classified (i.e. no graphics, inexpensive small messages) or display (these include graphics and colour and might take up half a page or more).
  • Subscriptions – selling a subscription to a product. Can be print (e.g. a print publication or magazine) or digital (e.g. an online database or service).
  • Conference production – this isn’t really classified as media sales. It’s basically a varied mix of sales, marketing, editorial and project management but for entry level conference production roles clients usually want someone with some sales experience, such as delegate sales.

A B2B Sales role, for example, could involve just one or several of these types of sales. It’s quite common to see delegate and sponsorship sales together or delegate and subscriptions.

Generally the skill set required for each type of sales role, and the types of clients they deal with, will be similar. But it’s always best to check with our consultants beforehand which ones the role involves just to avoid confusion.

For more information about Sales roles you can view our current vacancies page and select Sales in preferences.

You can also contact us on info@atwoodtate.co.uk or 020 7034 7900. Or via social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

 

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How to Use Blogging to Get into Publishing

How to use Blogging to get into Publishing

How to Use Blogging to Get into Publishing

How relevant is blogging to publishing? You’d be surprised. Blogging is not a hobby you should start specifically to enter publishing, but if you have one: mention it!

Blogging is a growing hobby, and a new career choice, in the 21st century. Having a blog gives people a platform to discuss what they want and voice their own opinions. But it also gives you the opportunity to work with others across multiple fields of industry. Not to mention develops skills in your own time which can help you in the long-run.

If you’re just starting out and are looking for an entry-level role within publishing, blogging is a great skill to have! So long as you have some work experience to back it up, blogging can tip the balance on whether or not you get an interview or even a job!

There are many different types of blogs, and all can help you gain many skills, from Coding, Design, Marketing, networking and more! But within the Publishing industry specifically book blogging is a very relevant skill!

Book blogging, or booktubing (video blogging), gives you the chance to voice your opinions about books and the latest book trends. A book blogger can write reviews, top ten lists, trend-reviews and more and each of these topics has some relevance to publishing. If you’re an established book blogger you may even work with publishers; taking part in blog tours, hosting giveaways and Q&As and attending book events.

Through communicating with publishers through these events, and voicing your own opinions, shows a potential employee that you understand the industry. You can see trends, converse with professionals and work to deadlines in a creative and independent manner.

This is relevant to all sectors, be it Trade or B2B, and all roles from IT, Editorial, Publicity and more!

It also shows an interest outside of work, which suggests to a future employer that you are a reliable candidate with a keen sense of the publishing industry.

Whether you’re a book blogger or not; blogging is skill to add to your CV!

Here some things you can highlight to show how blogging is useful to you:

  • Commitment: The longer you’ve been blogging the better. This shows commitment and creative thinking, and also proves that you can work well independently.
  • Networking: If you’ve worked with brands or publishers mention it on your CV. Not only does it prove your communicational skills, but also shows an understanding of the industries you mention. This is particularly good if the brands are relevant to the job you’re applying for.
  • Social Media and SEO abilities: Have you got 1000 twitter followers because of your blog publicity? Mention it! Do you understand SEO? Mention it!
  • Coding: If you’ve altered your HTML yourself or have learnt about it then put that down as a skill. For more information about HTML and how to do it, look at our series of posts here!
  •  Design: Did you design your blog, or make your own graphics/headers? Have you got original artwork or worked with others to create artwork? Put it on your CV.

There are so many relevant and useful skills which can be a real pull to employers when looking at CV.

Make sure you have other work experience to back up your blog experiences, but also be sure to highlight the skills you have learnt through blogging! It could mean the difference between getting a job interview and getting a job when you’re first starting out!

Need any more tips about how to enter publishing? Take a look at our Work Experience & Entry-Level Resources!

For more advice, or if you have any questions, get in touch via any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Writing a Winning Sales CV

Writing a Winning Sales CV

Writing a Winning Sales CV

Creating the perfect CV is one of the most important things for any job seeker. But particularly so for sales people. Where a journalist can submit samples of their writing or a designer a portfolio of work, as a sales person your CV has to do most of the talking.

Having reviewed many CVs in my time in recruitment, I’ve come to identify what makes an effective and well written CV for sales roles. There are many simple bits of information that candidates miss out which may affect their chances of being considered for a job.

So you don’t make the same mistake, I’ve compiled some guidelines of key things to include!

Whether a second jobber or an experienced sales manager you should include:

  • Sales figures – Where possible you should include details of revenue achieved, targets met, sales made etc… Always make sure they are honest and that you can back them up if asked about them in an interview.
  • Achievements – You should give examples of particular successes you’ve had, whether securing a large deal, signing on a new client…
  • Products & clients – If you’ve worked for a large organisation do specify what area of the business or publication you worked on or what type of products you were selling. It’s also useful to know who you were selling to or specific regions you dealt with.
  • Languages – If you have professional competency in more than one language and would be willing to use it at work, tell us! It might be just what a particular client is looking for.
  • Travel – If you are used to travelling a lot and enjoy it, it’s good to know and if applying for field sales positions, do mention if you have a clean driving licence and car.
  • Line management – If you’ve managed staff, say how many and whether they were office or field based.

Last but not least, being a successful sales person is often very much about your personality so don’t be afraid to let this show on your CV. Also remember that you need strong communication skills and to be well presented and professional so your CV should demonstrate this.

For more general advice on CV layout, you should visit https://atwoodtatepublishingjobs.co.uk/advice/.

If you have any questions get in touch via social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Companies: Why You Should Consider Temps

Why You Should Consider Temps

Companies: Why You Should Consider Temps

Our articles on temping have typically been to inform candidates of the many benefits that come with temping, both professionally and personally. But today, we’d like to point out the many reasons why temping is such a useful avenue for clients to consider.

  • The flexibility of temps also means company flexibility.

If you’re expanding your team but you’re not quite prepared to hire a permanent person, a temporary employee is a great way to establish exactly what it is you need in terms of additional resources. Maybe you’ve never had extra hands on deck and you’re only now starting to realise the new objectives you can tackle. A temp-to-perm scenario can be a match made in heaven for company and employee alike. As someone grows into a newly created role and reveals the kind of results that can be produced with more staff. The manager can then take these results to HR as Exhibit A on what expanding the team can mean for everyone.

But more than that,

  • Temps bring their own expertise with them.

They don’t need to be entry-level candidates acting as a stop-gap. By hiring consultants or veteran freelancers, a company also gets to avail of a temporary worker’s own experiences, the different business practices they’ve witnessed in their time. New blood often means new ideas and even if the worker doesn’t stick around, their contributions can last forever.

And, of course,

  • Temporary workers can provide much needed breathing space to permanent employees.

When the day-to-day administration is taken off their hands, they’re able to concentrate on the bigger picture and implement the projects. This improve service and streamline practices. You can get a lot done when you don’t have to sweat the small stuff. Even if it’s only for a little while.

So, for anyone who’s currently reviewing team numbers or work-loads, don’t commit until you know for sure exactly what you need – try a temp today! Get in touch with Kellie Millar, who manages our Temps and Freelancers desk, or her colleague, Alison Redfearn, and they can send you more workers than you can shake a stick at!

5 reasons to get a temp:

  • Cover sick leave
  • Cover holiday
  • Help with a project
  • Flexibility – have for 1 day / 1 week / 1 month…
  • No admin – we cover all payment, NI, holiday pay, pension

Kellie Millar
E: kelliemillar@atwoodtate.co.uk
Tel: 02070347897

Alison Redfearn
E: alisonredfearn@atwoodtate.co.uk
Tel: 02070347922

You can also contact us with any questions via our social media pages: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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