Tag Archives: Atwood Tate

International Literacy Day

Today, 8th September, is International Literacy Day, a day observed by UN member states to internationally recognise the importance of literacy to individuals, communities and societies, and aims to increase literacy around the world.

You can read more about the aims of this international day here on the UNESCO website: http://en.unesco.org/themes/literacy-all/literacy-day.

This year, the focus is on Digital Literacy, and how the changes in technology and the move towards new digital environments is changing the understanding of what literacy is, and how a lack of digital literacy skills could further marginalise those without basic literacy skills.

To mark this day, some of Atwood Tate have thought back to those books which were formative in helping us learn to read initially; books which are often forgotten but are hugely important first steps.

Andrew Willis

The first  books I can remember reading were The Magic Key series, which followed Biff, Chip and Kipper, created by Roderick Hunt and published by Oxford University Press. As part of the National Curriculum, a whole generation must have learnt to read, thanks in part to The Magic Key.

Alice Crick

I still remember my parents reading the very first Harry Potter books to me as a child. It really instilled the joys of reading in me from an early age.

Claire Louise Kemp

I don’t remember learning to read, but some of the first books I remember loving were books by Beatrix Potter and the Mr Men books.

Helen Speedy

I loved the Usborne Book of Wizards and the Usborne Book of Witches.  The illustrations by the late Stephen Cartwright take me right back to childhood when I look at them now and I’m so pleased to see that they are still in print, even if it’s in a slightly different format.  I also used to spend hours looking through The Usborne First Thousand Words trying to spot the little duck in each picture. My Mum, a German teacher, also bought us a copy of this in German in the hope we’d also become linguists…

 

Atwood Tate support the charity Beanstalk, who do fantastic work providing one-to-one literacy support to children who struggle with their reading ability and confidence.

 

 

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Consultant in the Hot Seat: Alice Crick

This week, our Oxford based Recruitment Consultant Alice Crick takes to the Hot Seat.

If you could write ‘THE book’ on something, the definitive how-to guide on any subject, which topic would you choose?

If I could write one incredible book on something, it would definitely be a self-help guide on living a truly fulfilling and happy life. As cheesy as it sounds, I don’t think anyone’s quite cracked it yet, and it would be amazing to be the one with all of the answers to those big life questions.

What three books changed your life?

Three books that really struck a chord with me are The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky, and The Reluctant Fundamentalist by Mohsin Hamid. The first two are quite similar, and I found them both particularly emotional reads as they really resonated with me. You definitely learn to empathise with the main characters, which in turn teaches you how to better relate to others in the real world. I think that is one of the most genuine signs of a good book. The Reluctant Fundamentalist was the first book I ever studied on my English Literature course at university; I found it impressive how Hamid provokes western readers to consider a new cultural perspective from ‘the other side’. It’s another incredibly powerful read that makes you question the cultural biases ingrained into us from a young age.

What have been the highlights of the past year?

My highlights from the past year have definitely been graduating from Royal Holloway with a 2:1 in English, moving to Oxford with my boyfriend, and starting a full time job as a Publishing Recruitment Consultant here at Atwood Tate. Most people don’t take on so many big changes all at once, but here I am!

What is on your birthday wish list?

Home things, home things and… more home things! Having moved very recently, I’m eager to get my ‘hygge’ on (the Danish art of living well), by making my home super cosy just in time for those chilly autumn and winter months.

True fact:

Before committing to a course at university, I spent a year learning how to be a professional musician at an academy. As you can see, that one didn’t quite work out!

 

Alice Crick covers Marketing, Sales, Publicity, Rights & International Sales, Contracts & Royalties, Customer Services in all UK locations outside of London, Home Counties and East Anglia, in all sectors excluding B2B & Medcomms.

To find out more about the roles each of our consultants cover, go to the “Meet the Team” page:

https://www.atwoodtatepublishingjobs.co.uk/about/meet-the-team.aspx

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Advertising Salary on Publishing Roles

Advertising Salary on Publishing Roles

Recently, there has been some discussion online about a lack of transparency in publishing recruitment in regards to agencies (and publishers) not disclosing the salaries on job adverts.

‘Available on request’?

At Atwood Tate, we disclose salary information on advertisements where we are permitted, but much of the time our clients ask us to keep this information confidential until point of enquiry.  There are a variety of reasons why employers wish to keep salary confidential or as “available on application”.  It can be because they wish to remain flexible or to maintain confidentiality across the company.  Other employees who are in similar roles may not be keen for their salary banding to be public knowledge.

We understand that this may make things seem a little more difficult for job seekers, but, although we are often not permitted to disclose the salary on the advert itself, for the vacancies we are working on we will always be happy to disclose information about the salary of the role if you are registered with us or send us your CV when you enquire about the position.

Salary advice before submission

We will always be clear on the salary range available for a job before we agree with you to submit your application.  You will have the opportunity to state your desired salary, so that expectations on this issue are managed on both sides from the outset.

In most cases, we will be able to provide greater detail than is supplied on the advert and this ensures no candidate arrives at an interview only to discover that the salary offered for a job does not meet their requirements. We are here to help on that front and can add a level of insight and transparency.

Call our Consultants

Don’t be shy of calling a telephone number on an advert for more information about the salary level. In some cases the advertiser may not be able to give you an exact figure, but in those cases, we would advise that you give the hiring manager or recruiter an idea of the salary that you would be looking for and they should be able to tell you if the position advertised would be in line with that.

At Atwood Tate, we are all for transparency and we will do our best to provide as much relevant information as possible when guiding you through the application process.

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A Day In The Life Of . . . A Temporary Office Manager

Temping with Atwood Tate can open up a world of opportunities and can put you on the road to employment as soon as tomorrow!

We thought we’d share some of our temps’ experiences and demonstrate the variety of roles available…

 

A Day In The Life Of . . . A Temporary Office Manager

What was your role and how long was the assignment for?

I was assigned to a trade book publisher as a Temporary Office Manager for 4 weeks.

Were you interviewed for the role?  

Yes, briefly on the morning that I started in the role. They needed someone to fill the role quickly, at short-notice, so I started working there within two days of being told about the role.

What were your key duties?

As Office Manager, I was in charge of the Post-Room, which involved distributing incoming post, and ordering couriers and franking outgoing mail. It was also my duty to monitor and report any facilities issues within the office, and also to monitor and order office supplies. I also managed the logistics of author book signings in the office. Other duties included processing invoices, general administrative duties, and various ad-hoc duties as they arose.

Tell us about the culture?

The office was a friendly and welcoming environment to work in. As the office was open plan, the different departments were all very approachable, and there was a great sense of a team effort, supporting each other, across the entire office.

What did you like best?

What I liked best about this role was that it was a busy and changing role, where there were new challenges and opportunities each day. I also enjoyed the opportunity to interact and work with all of the departments in the office.

What did you learn?

I learnt a lot about how a trade book publisher works, and how each individual department plays a vital role in bringing a new book title to fruition. I also learnt a great deal about the logistics side of publishing, from sending out new releases for promotional purposes, how to order a courier to transport a large window display. Finally, I learnt the importance of ensuring a happy office, such as getting light bulbs changed quickly, ensuring the air conditioning works and keeping coffee supplies well stocked!

How did you find your experience with Atwood Tate?

I had a great experience with Atwood Tate, being kept informed at all stages of taking on the assignment as to what was going on, and being briefed along the way as to what the role would involve and what was expected of me. They were always available to contact by phone and email whenever needed to.

How did Atwood Tate approach you for the role? Were you registered on Atwood Tate’s database or was it via a job board?

I had registered for Temping opportunities with Atwood Tate, and they contacted me asking if it would be possible for me to start in the role immediately.

Interested in temporary opportunities? Please contact Atwood Tate’s temps team administrator, Michael Lawlor, at michaellawlor@atwoodtate.co.uk

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What I’ve Learnt from working at Atwood Tate as Administrator & Social Media Coordinator

Working at Atwood Tate
What I’ve Learnt working as Administrator & Social Media Coordinator at Atwood Tate

In July 2016 I joined Atwood Tate as a maternity cover Administrator. In October I was made permanent as the Administrator and Social Media Coordinator. Sadly I am now leaving the company which I have absolutely loved working for, for an exciting opportunity working as a Marketing and Publicity Executive at a Trade publishing house.

As Administrator, and later Social Media Coordinator, I have learnt a lot during my time at Atwood Tate! From the different publishing sectors to the true cost of London commuting!

Upon leaving University in May 2016 I hectically began applying for numerous jobs and work experience placements within publishing and had first-hand experience of the difficulty of breaking into this industry.

Publishing is an increasingly competitive world to enter into and often candidates requires a lot of experience to get an entry-level job. With work experience placements often over-subscribed and most not covering more than expenses, it was sometimes difficult to add extra work experience to my CV. Instead I developed my skills within blogging, social media and coding which eventually led to me gaining a few interviews.

If you want to learn more about how blogging, YouTubing and Coding/HTML can help make your CV’s stand out take a look at our blog posts on these subjects!

I was lucky enough to come across a vacancy at Atwood Tate and attended an interview for the role. I was later offered the position of Administrator and jumped at the opportunity to be working within the publishing industry on the recruitment side of things.

Working in recruitment is a great way to learn about the industry and to network with a lot of people working within it.

Ultimately, I’ve decided to return to my roots within publishing, but during my time at Atwood Tate I have learnt many things about this industry and have had a great time doing so:

What I’ve Learnt Working at Atwood Tate:

  • There are more sectors in publishing that just Trade, Academic and Educational. This includes: B2B (Business to Business), STM (Science Technical and Medical) and Professional publishing. These sectors are just as exciting as the three I knew about prior to joining, and are a great place to build experience and learn more about publishing.
  • Also, there are a lot more roles within publishing than just editorial. A lot of people are looking to enter Editorial positions when they first apply for publishing roles, but Publicity, Sales, Rights and many other job roles are just as engrossing and immersive within the industry
  • Recruitment Companies, such as Atwood Tate, are a great resource for job-hunters, both experienced and entry-level. Even if Atwood Tate have no available roles for entry-level candidates we have created resources for entry-level candidates across our social media and on our website. This includes fortnightly Q&As, a work experience resources page, quick email responses to inquiries and regular helpful blog posts on job applications, temping and skills development.
  • Publishing Recruitment is just as immersive as working in a publishing house. When I first joined Atwood Tate I wanted to meet people within publishing, and develop my networking abilities. Since starting I have gone to numerous Society of Young Publishers event, attended the London Book Fair and LBF seminars, gone to the Borough Book Bash and generally communicated with publishing houses and publishers via our Social Media accounts
  • And last but not least, one of the best things I’ve learnt from working at Atwood Tate: helping people to find a job within publishing is a fantastic feeling.

Not only have I met some great people outside of the office but I have also made some fantastic friends within the company as well – mostly from bringing in copious amounts of cake!

One of the best bits of feedback we can receive from candidates and clients alike is about how friendly they find the staff at Atwood Tate, and it’s true! I may be biased but the main aim of everyone at Atwood Tate is to get our candidates their dream jobs, and clients their dream employees. And to give advice during the times that we’re waiting for those jobs to come in.

I’m leaving Atwood Tate in the full knowledge that if I ever need a new job in future I will be in safe hands when coming to them.

I also leave behind our new social media which I have had the great responsibility and joy of developing, including our YouTube Channel and Instagram. I leave this in the capable hands of our new Administrator and Social Media Coordinator: Andrew Willis.

You’ll be hearing more about Andrew in the coming week! So watch out for that.

For now I leave Atwood Tate with huge thanks for the wonderful opportunities and experiences I have had. And best of luck to our new Administrator Andrew, who’s going to do a wonderful job!

 

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Stand Up For Science: Why STM Publishing in April is all about March?

Today we have a guest post from STM publishing professional, Emma Williams.

Emma Williams STM publishing

After completing an MA in Publishing at the Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies (OICPS) Emma began her career in STM Publishing almost 7 years ago at Elsevier, specializing in licensing and journal management. Emma is currently happily employed within the Health Sciences group at Wiley, helping partner societies to manage and develop their journals to their fullest potential. Also a former Society of Young Publishers Oxford Chair, Emma is a particularly keen follower of industry developments and innovation and interested in supporting early career professionals. Emma advocates The Scholarly Kitchen blog to nearly everyone she meets in Publishing, and is active on Twitter where you can get in touch via @TheRightsOne (personal) or @JournalsEmma (professional) respectively.

Stand Up For Science: Why STM Publishing in April is All About March?

You may not see it, but scientific and academic research is all around you. It helped build your house, fixed your headache, drove or cycled you to work, was mixed into your coffee and even contributed to that mysterious three lbs that you just can’t shake…

(Authors Note: This could also be the commonly practiced Schrodinger’s Biscuit Tin experiment too- if the lid is closed, are there even edible biscuits in there?)

Research in all its forms and fields is effectively the pursuit of an objective truth, often for the purpose of the benefit and/or advancement of humanity. In a time when ‘alternative’ facts and false news run riot, we must be like Indiana Jones and the Grail Knight- well informed so we can choose wisely. By this, I mean that we must try to understand and communicate the importance of well structured, methodologically sound, evidence based research practices and their contribution to defensible end results.

In the past, there have been barriers to communicating research to the public, outside of traditional scholarly journal publication.

Historically, science was commonly a pursuit for the wealthy elite and discussed in technically complex language between experts in the field firstly through correspondence, which eventually became formalized within Scholarly publishing. I would encourage everyone (especially all early career STM publishing professionals) to look at the creation of The Royal Society’s Philosophical Transactions for more on the development of early scholarly publishing.

Alongside the formalization of these academic conversations around research, history has also documented public distrust of science and scientists. Perhaps this relates to an amount of disconnect from scientific conversation, but it may also be defensive (science is always a potential catalyst for innovation) against change for reasons which people may not like, be ready for, or even fully understand. This is clearly documented internationally in many cases of fear of ‘magic’ or witchcraft, religious conflict, and even cultural stereotyping.

Just think briefly for a moment on events like the Salem Witch Trials (circa 1692), or films such as Terminator (1984). Consider novels like Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886) or Frankenstein (1818). What about the depictions in both old and new media primarily made for young children, of Belle’s so called ‘crackpot’ inventor father in the story of Beauty and the Beast (1991) ? His eccentricity (i.e. scientific curiosity) predisposes him to such general public concern that he is nearly sent to an asylum- a particularly terrifying and often permanent commitment in past days. It is clear that in the historic public consciousness, there were very real fears that scientific curiosity, or developments, left unchecked would then get humanity ‘in over their heads’ across a variety of situations.

I believe that most people, living during even the more modern dates of some of these examples, would have thought of 2017 as sufficiently advanced into ‘The Future’, to expect better understanding, explanation and truthful rationalization of some of these fears. However, the modern citizen now faces a frightening time- we see heightened (or certainly more vocalized) opposition to evidence-based science; fear of globalization; and concerns about access to quality education.

So where can we find these trusted truths, to understand our world, communicate with each other and inform appropriate decision making for public good?

Although publishers and academia alike have recognized and begun to rectify some of the conversational gaps between academic research reporting and the general public through a wide variety of science engagement initiatives (Pint of Science events, or Publisher blogs for example) there is clearly still a lot of work to be done around mitigating unfounded fears and improving integrative discussion.

Now more than ever, the public must be able to either understand research processes directly, or to trust a third party to understand these and then report research results accordingly. Only then can we assess that end result and allow it to inform our own decisions and opinions. If we are not able to understand or we do not have access to such trusted sources, we are increasingly vulnerable to choosing poorly, and any ensuing negative consequences on an individual, national and a global level.

This is why scientists, academics, publishers and many other people gathered in various locations worldwide to March for Science on Saturday 22nd April. My personal experience of the global research community is that it is richly diverse, and full of those who have decided to embrace their curiosity about how something works, or could be improved, or could be learned from, and report back to the rest of us. I consider these people- our scientists and researchers- as an advanced guard, gathering intelligence on everything from climate change to medicine to lessons from history.

It is my opinion that we should fund and support research and engage with scientists and academics wherever possible in order to ensure that we don’t repeat mistakes, help people faster and preserve our world for generations to come.

For more information, please see:

https://www.marchforscience.com/
https://hub.wiley.com/community/exchanges/discover/blog/2017/02/16/values-have-no-borders?referrer=exchanges
Want more? Please see the below articles that the author came across while writing this, for ‘interesting’ further reading:

1. ‘Fake research’ comes under scrutiny, by H. Briggs, BBC News, 27th March 2017. Accessed via http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-39357819 on 18th April 2017.

2. 8 Hilarious Historical Fears That Seriously Delayed Progress by P. Carnell, Cracked, March 11th 2015. Accessed via http://www.cracked.com/article_22224_8-plainly-stupid-fears-that-held-back-human-progress.html on 17th April 2017.

3. We have always been modern, and it has often scared us by R. Higgitt, The Guardian, 24th June 2013. Accessed via https://www.theguardian.com/science/the-h-word/2013/jun/24/technology-history-modernity-speed-fears on 18th April 2017.

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SYP Literary Bingo

A few of our consultants are happy to be attending the SYP (Society of Young Publishers) Literary Bingo event on the 12th April! It’s sure to be a fun night, filled with laughs and book prizes and we can’t wait to attend!
Let us know if you’re going on any of our social media accounts! We’d love for you to come and say hello!

The evening is sure to be great fun and at £3 for members and £6 for non-members it’s an affordable evening out!

To book tickets to the event you need to go to the Eventbrite page here!

You can contact us here: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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The Benefits of Being a Niche Recruitment Agency

Benefits of being a niche recruitment

The Benefits of Being a Niche Recruitment Agency

Today we wanted to share the benefits of registering with a niche recruitment agency like Atwood Tate. We’re a niche agency as we only handle recruitment within the Publishing industry; this includes publishing of books, journals, magazines and online content in these sectors: academic, educational, professional, STM, trade books, business information and events, plus companies that help deliver content (but excluding newspapers or consumer magazines).

Here are some of the benefits of our being a niche agency, and how it can help you find a job within publishing:

1.       Subject Knowledge

Being a niche agency it is particularly useful to have recruitment consultants who have experience in the industry for which we are recruiting. All of our team members have experience in publishing through past careers in Rights, Marketing, Editing and Recruitment at various publishing houses in different sectors, across the globe. This makes us specifically qualified to understand what our clients are looking for in candidates and which skills are relevant on a candidate’s CV for each job.

        2. Networking

Having a team with a past in publishing is also useful in creating contacts and networking! The publishing industry is a particularly friendly industry which often converses through social media and events on a regular basis. Because of our networking and past involvement in the industry we have contacts in nearly all sectors of publishing. As such we are a trusted recruitment agency with an exceptionally strong client list.

        3. Social Media

Since we’re a niche recruitment agency all of our social media and advice posts are focussed around the publishing industry! Whilst our advice on writing CVs and Cover Letters can be applied, mostly, across all industries, are blog posts on Design CVs and YouTube videos on Academic Publishing for example, are tailored to our candidates’ needs and requests!

        4. Strong Candidates

Our clients know that when we send them a CV we are sending them a strong applicant with all the skills required for the role. With our knowledge of the industry and our registration process we can find the perfect role for each candidate, and the perfect candidate for each role. If you haven’t got the skills or experience for a particular job just yet, we can advise you on the right direction to obtain those skills and we work with you throughout your career.

          5. Temps Desk

Temps are an incredibly useful workforce in publishing. They can help cover particularly busy times of the year, such as the London Book Fair, and fill in a role during the recruitment process. Since we’re a specialist niche agency, all of our temps have the necessary skills to come into a publishing company and do the work required without much instruction.

For more information on Atwood Tate’s services and team take a look at look at our website.

You can also contact us via social media: TwitterFacebook, LinkedInYouTube or Instagram.

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Our Favourite Children’s Books

Childrens Books

Our Favourite Children’s Books

This week is the Bologna Children’s Book Fair! We’re not attending this event (we’re still not over the London Book Fair) but we’re keeping up to date with all the exciting deals and news on the latest books.

In honour of the Bologna Book Fair, and it’s speciality towards children’s books, we thought we would share some of our teams favourite children’s books!

Lucy Slater, Recruitment Consultant:

Lucy’s favourite childhood books include a sweet story about family life, the tale of a cuddly bear and another book on an odorous witch with Goblins for next door neighbours.

Michael Lawlor, Temps Team Administrator:

Michael’s favourite childhood book is all about two amphibious friends who go on lots of adventures!

Ellie Pilcher, Administrator & Social Media Coordinator:

Ellie’s favourite stories are big childhood classics, about family, fantasy worlds and lots of magic!

Claire Louise Kemp, Senior Recruitment Consultant:

Claire Louise’s favourite childhood book is a story about a Guinea Pig, called Olga da Polga, and her animal friends.

Alison Redfearn, Recruitment Consultant:

Alison’s favourite books are classics about a friendly dog called Hairy, a Witch who really isn’t very good at magic and a little girl with special powers and  a love of reading.

Olivia Constantinides, Senior Recruitment Consultant

Olivia couldn’t get enough Jacqueline Wilson when she was younger, she thinks she must have read them all!

Helen Speedy, Associate Director

Helen’s favourite books include a story about a boy and his toy dog, a tale about a horrible, smelly couple who are tricked by monkeys, and a series of books about four best friends and a pair of travelling pants (jeans).

Karine Nicpon, Senior Recruitment Consultant:

Karine’s favourite books are a mix of French and English novels. A very funny picture book about a masked chick called Blaise, a series of books about five children solving mysteries, and a revised children’s version of an English classic (which she was later very pleased to find she could read for the first time all over again when she got the original copy!)

David Martin, Recruitment Consultant

David’s favourite books are both Roald Dahl classics! One’s about a group of evil witches who hate children, and the other’s about a young boy who gets his revenge on an evil landowner.

What are some of your favourite children’s books?

Let us know in the comments below or on our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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BookTube 101: An evening with Sanne Vliegenthart & BookMachine

BookTube 101

BookTube 101

On Wednesday our Administrator and Social Media Coordinator Ellie attended the BookMachine’s event: BookTube 101.

BookTube is the name given to the community of book vloggers on YouTube (channels dedicated to the discussion of books) and booktubers are the given name of the vloggers that run these channels.

One such booktuber is Sanne Vliegenthart, of BooksandQuills, who was the guest host of the event. She came to discuss the relevance of BookTube to the publishing industry and how she has developed her own BookTube channel and career.

Starting out in 2008 Sanne created her channel BooksandQuills to discuss things she was interested in. At the time she was studying for an English Literature degree, so she wanted to discuss what she was reading. Sanne also covered other topics, as BookTube was not officially a ‘thing’ until around 2011.

In 2009 she began to focus more heavily on books when she took part in the 50 Book Challenge, a challenge to read 50 books in one year. Audiences were responsive to her videos documenting her progress, and she found her subscribers growing due to the challenges popularity.

Now, in 2017, her channel has over 160,000 subscribers, 11 million views and she has created over 600 videos since 2008.

BookTube & Publishing

Sanne links her successful BookTube channel to her getting a career in publishing. She currently works as the Social Media producer for Penguin Random House, and she previously worked for Hot Key Books, an imprint of Bonnier, as Digital and Social Media Manager.

With social media being a part of our everyday lives and new jobs within publishing being created specifically to accommodate and utilise it, a background in booktubing and blogging are a growing way to break into the publishing industry. You can read our post on using blogging to get into publishing here.

Along with discussing the benefits of booktubing on her career development, Sanne also discussed the relevance of BookTube to publishers looking to develop their marketing, sales and publicity approaches.

For most booktubers in Britain, booktubing is a hobby that is done alongside a full-time job or education. Out of the close community of booktubers Sanne is a part of, none of them are professional full-time YouTubers. But many of them do have links to the publishing community.

Some are social media producers at other publishing houses, others are writers, booksellers, freelance editors, marketing assistants and more.

BookTube & Publicity

Sanne then discussed how BookTube can help publishing companies publicise books and journals, similarly, if not more so, than blogs and blog tours.

  • YouTube videos often create more comments and discussions than blog posts do.
  • They can last longer than a blog post – imagine writing a 10 minute video into a cohesive blog post.
  • It’s easy to share content and they’re visually appealing
  • Subscribers of booktubers can develop a personal connection with the booktuber, through reading tastes, professionalism and consistency of posting.

BookTube & Sales

As an example, Sanne has procured, roughly, £45,000 for the publishing industry, selling books through an affiliate link to the Book Depository.

She pointed out that this figure is from one affiliate link only. She cannot monitor the amount her subscribers are spending buying books from her recommendations in shops, online or via subscriptions to websites such as Audible.

The topic turned from how booktubers can help to how they should be approached. Since booktubing is a hobby most booktubers will only read and discuss books that they themselves want to read. Sometimes they are sent books and publicity materials from publishers, but rarely accept anything unsolicited. Often publishers will request to send a book to a booktuber, but there is no requirement that they discuss the book on their channel unless they want to.

It is clear from Sanne’s channel and statistics alone that BookTube is incredibly popular and a worthwhile consideration to the development of the publishing industry.

Our YouTube Channel

We are very interested in the topic of BookTube and hearing some tips for starting a channel from Sanne, as we ourselves have a YouTube channel. So far we have created videos on topics such as How to get a Job Interview in PublishingHow to get into Academic Publishing and shared a vlog of our time at the London Book Fair 2017, among others. We’ve recognised the potential of YouTube for the publishing industry and are utilising it for recruitment.

We want to say a big thank you to BookMachine for holding the event, and to Sanne for hosting! Ellie had a great time!

For more information contact us on any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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