Tag Archives: Bookmachine

How technology can make reading Fun – Bookmachine Event

If kids are glued to their devices, where do books fit in? How can we make sure they keep reading for pleasure? Our expert speakers will look at different ways to engage young people online to make reading fun.

BookMachine is an informal event series. You are guaranteed to meet someone interesting and learn something new.

Are you attending this event? Let us know!

Buy your tickets here! 

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Creative collaboration & the future of publishing

Writers, agents, publishers and institutional brands are all grappling with the same dilemma: how to produce high-quality books and state of the art digital content whilst at the same time judiciously managing their costs. Project management includes multiple internal and external connections and skillsets.

Take a glimpse into the crystal ball of publishing with three experts and understand how the ever-evolving role of creative collaboration will affect all of us in the future.

whitefox are 5 years old this Spring and will be celebrating with drinks for everyone after the talks.

Free for Bookmachine members, £5 before 30th April and £8 from 30th until the event date: 9th May 2017.

Buy your tickets here! 

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BookTube 101: An evening with Sanne Vliegenthart & BookMachine

BookTube 101

BookTube 101

On Wednesday our Administrator and Social Media Coordinator Ellie attended the BookMachine’s event: BookTube 101.

BookTube is the name given to the community of book vloggers on YouTube (channels dedicated to the discussion of books) and booktubers are the given name of the vloggers that run these channels.

One such booktuber is Sanne Vliegenthart, of BooksandQuills, who was the guest host of the event. She came to discuss the relevance of BookTube to the publishing industry and how she has developed her own BookTube channel and career.

Starting out in 2008 Sanne created her channel BooksandQuills to discuss things she was interested in. At the time she was studying for an English Literature degree, so she wanted to discuss what she was reading. Sanne also covered other topics, as BookTube was not officially a ‘thing’ until around 2011.

In 2009 she began to focus more heavily on books when she took part in the 50 Book Challenge, a challenge to read 50 books in one year. Audiences were responsive to her videos documenting her progress, and she found her subscribers growing due to the challenges popularity.

Now, in 2017, her channel has over 160,000 subscribers, 11 million views and she has created over 600 videos since 2008.

BookTube & Publishing

Sanne links her successful BookTube channel to her getting a career in publishing. She currently works as the Social Media producer for Penguin Random House, and she previously worked for Hot Key Books, an imprint of Bonnier, as Digital and Social Media Manager.

With social media being a part of our everyday lives and new jobs within publishing being created specifically to accommodate and utilise it, a background in booktubing and blogging are a growing way to break into the publishing industry. You can read our post on using blogging to get into publishing here.

Along with discussing the benefits of booktubing on her career development, Sanne also discussed the relevance of BookTube to publishers looking to develop their marketing, sales and publicity approaches.

For most booktubers in Britain, booktubing is a hobby that is done alongside a full-time job or education. Out of the close community of booktubers Sanne is a part of, none of them are professional full-time YouTubers. But many of them do have links to the publishing community.

Some are social media producers at other publishing houses, others are writers, booksellers, freelance editors, marketing assistants and more.

BookTube & Publicity

Sanne then discussed how BookTube can help publishing companies publicise books and journals, similarly, if not more so, than blogs and blog tours.

  • YouTube videos often create more comments and discussions than blog posts do.
  • They can last longer than a blog post – imagine writing a 10 minute video into a cohesive blog post.
  • It’s easy to share content and they’re visually appealing
  • Subscribers of booktubers can develop a personal connection with the booktuber, through reading tastes, professionalism and consistency of posting.

BookTube & Sales

As an example, Sanne has procured, roughly, £45,000 for the publishing industry, selling books through an affiliate link to the Book Depository.

She pointed out that this figure is from one affiliate link only. She cannot monitor the amount her subscribers are spending buying books from her recommendations in shops, online or via subscriptions to websites such as Audible.

The topic turned from how booktubers can help to how they should be approached. Since booktubing is a hobby most booktubers will only read and discuss books that they themselves want to read. Sometimes they are sent books and publicity materials from publishers, but rarely accept anything unsolicited. Often publishers will request to send a book to a booktuber, but there is no requirement that they discuss the book on their channel unless they want to.

It is clear from Sanne’s channel and statistics alone that BookTube is incredibly popular and a worthwhile consideration to the development of the publishing industry.

Our YouTube Channel

We are very interested in the topic of BookTube and hearing some tips for starting a channel from Sanne, as we ourselves have a YouTube channel. So far we have created videos on topics such as How to get a Job Interview in PublishingHow to get into Academic Publishing and shared a vlog of our time at the London Book Fair 2017, among others. We’ve recognised the potential of YouTube for the publishing industry and are utilising it for recruitment.

We want to say a big thank you to BookMachine for holding the event, and to Sanne for hosting! Ellie had a great time!

For more information contact us on any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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BookMachine London: All about BookTube

Our administrator Ellie will be attending this Bookmachine event on the 29th March, at the Library in St Martin’s Lane. Learn all about BookTube from an established BookTuber
Sanne Vliegenthart. It is sure to be an interesting evening filled with fascinating new facts and fun!

Let us know if you’re attending by contacting us on any of our social media accounts: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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OPuS/Bookmachine/SYP Christmas Party

OPus/Bookmachine/SYP Christmas Party

Our consultants Lisa Smars and Claire Louise Kemp are very excited to be attending the OPuS, Bookmachine & SYP Christmas Party this year! Held at the Jam Factory in Oxford it is set to be a very fun, very festive, evening!

It is the perfect evening to mingle with everybody across the publishing industry, just a plain good night out.

Let us know if you’re going on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram and be sure to say hello to our colleagues if you see them!

Merry Christmas!

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Break into Publishing: Networking

Breaking into publishing: Networking

Common Symptom #2: Networking

Speak Softly and Carry a Big Book

You’re at a fancy venue. You have a glass of wine in your hand, maybe some food or maybe only the fond memory of food at this point, you’ve been standing here so long, watching, waiting, trying to find an in, an opening, a shot – that’s right, you’re networking.

Networking in publishing can be a fairly daunting prospect, especially for young graduates. It’s difficult to be assertive when you don’t claim to be an expert on anything this early in your career. And if you’re quiet and retiring, you’re not exactly going to make a lasting impression. But it’s a worthwhile endeavour so it’s important to try.

As we’ve previously covered in our work experience blog, publishing is a saturated market so you will always have to run a little faster, climb a little higher, work just that little bit harder, to make any headway. It can be bitter pill to swallow but it comes back to how badly you want it.

The important thing to remember is that, believe it or not, networking in the publishing world can actually be quite fun! It’s a chance to mingle with like-minded people who know your struggle and are usually quite helpful in offering advice or tips. A memorable conversation can go a long way. What starts as an observation about the venue or your journey there can lead to suggestions and introductions you could not have come across in any online search you might try. Take a business card, take two! Take as many as you can until you have a winning hand. And if you have your own cards, even better.

Events

There are great events happening all the time, from Christmas parties to pub quizzes, hosted by a variety of societies and institutes, all of them masters at bringing people together for a night of fun and games while also creating an ideal space for networking.

And don’t worry, if networking doesn’t come naturally to you, remember that, like everything it gets easier the more you do it. You don’t need to own the room, you can be yourself and let your passion show through. Think of talking points in advance to help break the ice, familiarise yourself with publishers and who their authors are so you can show you know their company and what they’re about.

Next step? Sign up to newsletters, check out websites like the SYP, Bookseller, BookMachine, then pencil in some dates – who knows, it’s possible you could bump into one of our staff making the rounds and we might be just the person who can help you!

If you have a question in need of answering, about networking or other work experience related questions, let us know on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or LinkedIn!

 

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BookMachine – How to Build a Community

Kellie and I went to BookMachine event How to Build a Community. It was a really good evening and we learnt loads of interesting facts about how to engage with your audience and sell more books!

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The first speaker was Sara Perkins who currently works for Disney on Social Media and Community strategies. She started by defining the word community and the importance of defining your audience, explaining that communities are a group who are strengthened by common beliefs and passions.

Sara then went on to talk about five key points to building effective communities:

  1. Define your community and understand your audience, make sure that your brand is the right fit and find people in your business who understand it and can fully engage with it – social media should be fully integrated into the marketing mix
  2. Have a purpose
  3. Keep it real, make sure that your space is appropriate and that you mirror real life
  4. Keep your eye on the future, be proactive and take the time to consider future trends
  5. Nurture your communities and understand and appreciate that it needs time and attention to grow

Will Rycroft, Community Manager at Vintage, was the next speaker who shared his experiences of building a community at Vintage. He reiterated the fact that you need to know your audience and think about the right times to share content on social media. He also said that your voice must be authentic and not phoney – your tone of voice must be right for the brand. He talked about the importance of collaboration, working together with large and small organisations. He used the example of how Vintage have collaborated with arts organisations as they recognised that book people tend to also like art and culture.

Thanks very much BookMachine for a great evening, we both came away very inspired on how we can use this in our own work!

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‘Publishing for Kids: how to reach book buyers online’ at BookMachine

Children's

For those of you that missed last night’s BookMachine event, here are a few notes on what we picked up from the four excellent speakers on the subject of ‘Publishing for Kids: how to reach book buyers online’

Steve Bohme, UK Research Director at Nielsen Book Research presented some interesting statistics on children’s online habits.

You Tube and video sharing featured consistently as the most popular online habit for 0-17 years-olds.  Use of WhatsApp and Netflix is also on the rise.

However, whilst children’s book buyers are more engaged in the online world than other book buyers and spend a lot of their online time on You Tube, only 33% of children’s books are purchased online and browsing video sites is very low on the list of places that kids discover books online.  Is there an untapped opportunity here for children’s publishers?

Next up was Claire Morrison, Senior Marketing Manager for DK Books, who confirmed that for this well-established brand, physical books were still their biggest seller with sales still on the rise.  DK is one of a few trade book publishers to have a search and analytics team and Claire described the work that this team carries out on identifying the personae of their buyers. Ensuring their content is in line with the consumer’s expectations is vital to maintaining DK’s strong and trusted brand. Claire stressed the importance of the brand’s online presence as a means of interacting with customers and DK prides itself on have a 100% rating on giving feedback via its social media channels.  Claire also introduced DK’s online encyclopaedia project DKFindOut!.

After a break and a mingle, Charlotte Hoare the Digital Marketing Manager at Hachette Children’s Books warned about the perils of static websites, which may seem a cheaper option than a proper CMS, but will prove more costly in the long run.  She also noted the tendency for marketers to set up websites for one short marketing campaign only for this website to be forgotten and not updated until a reminder arrives that the domain name is about to expire.  Her advice was to be braver and be wiser when devising digital marketing campaigns.

The final speaker of the evening was Sven Huber, founder and CEO of Boolino.  Boolino was launched in the Spanish market in 2011 and its vision is “to become globally the leading online platform about children’s books and reading, for both parents and all the people involved in the education of children aged between 0 and 12 years”.  The founders of Boolino realised that very few readers were discovering books online and most publishers find it challenging to connect with consumers online (and in particular parents).  In addition, they felt that the majority of children’s publishers were lacking in good segmented email marketing lists. By bringing together on their website content relating to children’s books and parents, Boolino aims to provide that age segmented data.  Boolino has created an ecosystem of more than 1000 bloggers and is attempting to simulate the discovery process you get in bookstores.

The next BookMachine event is BookMachine at The London Book Fair 2016 on April 13 @ 4.30 pm – 5.30 pm.  See you there!

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BookMachine: Next Five Years in Publishing

bookmachine-strap

Last week saw another fantastic BookMachine event in Oxford. Co-hosted by the Oxford Publishing Society, the event was sponsored by PLSclear and featured a talk from Michael Bhaskar.

Michael spoke eloquently and passionately about the “Next Five Years in Publishing”. To get a flavour of what he talked about, do read the recent Q&A he did with BookMachine.

The night started with a whistle stop tour of 500 years of publishing history – as an industry, we have been consistently innovative and at the forefront of a lot of major change. Michael then focused in more detail on the past five years, which have all been about consolidation in the market place and the discoverability of content.

So what will the next five years bring us? The themes of consolidation and problems (and solutions) around discoverability will remain key, but Michael feels strongly that we need to look to curation and helping people find the good stuff in the sea of content. Quality, not quantity should be our mantra.

I was left with the impression that, whilst no one knows the answers to how exactly we should go about doing things, there is a lot to be hopeful for in the future of our industry as we continue to innovate and experiment.

Michael is the Co-founder and Publishing Director of Canelo, a new digital publisher. Previously he was Digital Publishing Director at Profile Books and Serpent’s Tail and has worked at Pan Macmillan, a literary agency, an economics consultancy and a newspaper amongst others.

What were your take-away’s from the night? Do let us know in the comments, or jump into the conversation on Twitter (@atwoodtate & @kempcl)

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