Tag Archives: BookTube

SYP Practical Workshops: How to be a Booktuber

How to be a booktuber

SYP Practical Workshops: How to be a BookTuber

On Monday evening our Administrator and Social Media Coordinator Ellie was lucky enough to attend the first of the Society of Young Publishers (SYP) Practical workshops. The topic was:

How to be Booktuber.

The workshops are a new yearly series of workshops occurring once a month, about a different topic each month. For a full list of the upcoming workshops and how to apply to take part in one take a look at the SYP’s page here.

This workshop was run by an established Booktuber: Leena Normington, aka justkissmyfrog on YouTube.

Leena has previously worked as a Creative Producer for Pan Macmillan, running their BookBreak series on YouTube, and currently works for the Telegraph. She has been a Booktuber for 7 years and was happy to share some tips and practical advice about starting a BookTube channel.

Held at Hachette, the evening consisted of a lot of laughter, discussions and a task of pitching a YouTube video around a certain book.

The workshop was fully attended by 10 people so everyone got a chance to speak, ask questions and generally chat about the different ways YouTube can helping the publishing community within publicity, marketing, sales and more.

Here are our three top tips we took from the event:

  • Affiliate links on YouTube channels

Affiliate links are links to website and booksellers online where viewers of YouTube videos can purchase any of the products, in this case books, discussed within the video. Not only are these links great for promoting books but they’re also fantastic for monitoring how many and what type of books are being bought by the audience. Through this information a Booktuber can monitor the tastes of their audience and adapt to suit them, as well as prove that BookTube sells books!

  • YouTube & Google Analytics

Views are not everything…no, really! On YouTube when you post a video you can go to the Creator Studio and view your analytics for your channel and each individual video. Whilst getting 1000 views on a video would be fantastic, it’s better if the watch time of the video (the average length of time a person spent viewing the video) is higher or equal to the length of the video. If you have 1000 views, but the viewers only spent an average of 30 seconds watching a 4 minute video, this actually shows that this video wasn’t as successful as you thought. If a video has only 100 views but was watched for the entirety of its length this was a more successful video.

  • Tone & Topic

A strong point to take away from this workshop was the need for a consistent tone and topic across all social media channels within business. If a business has a Twitter, Instagram, newsletter etc, when building a new YouTube channel you need to build a channel that matches the established social media in tone and topic. It would be jarring to create fun, bright videos about different topics if the company’s other social media is very serious and focused solely on one topic.

BookTube is a growing social media platform, one which we ourselves have begun, and has been featured recently at several events. You can read about the BookTube event ran by BookMachine last month here.

This workshop was a lot of fun and left Ellie with a lot of information to take away; from software advice to campaign planning. It it was a fantastic evening with Leena and other SYP members and we can’t wait to hear about, and maybe attend, some of the next workshops!

For more information the workshops be sure to follow the SYP on twitter at @SYP_UK and also follow the official hashtag for the workshops: #SYPpubskills

Do you like the sound of BookTube or the SYP workshops? Let us know on any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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BookTube 101: An evening with Sanne Vliegenthart & BookMachine

BookTube 101

BookTube 101

On Wednesday our Administrator and Social Media Coordinator Ellie attended the BookMachine’s event: BookTube 101.

BookTube is the name given to the community of book vloggers on YouTube (channels dedicated to the discussion of books) and booktubers are the given name of the vloggers that run these channels.

One such booktuber is Sanne Vliegenthart, of BooksandQuills, who was the guest host of the event. She came to discuss the relevance of BookTube to the publishing industry and how she has developed her own BookTube channel and career.

Starting out in 2008 Sanne created her channel BooksandQuills to discuss things she was interested in. At the time she was studying for an English Literature degree, so she wanted to discuss what she was reading. Sanne also covered other topics, as BookTube was not officially a ‘thing’ until around 2011.

In 2009 she began to focus more heavily on books when she took part in the 50 Book Challenge, a challenge to read 50 books in one year. Audiences were responsive to her videos documenting her progress, and she found her subscribers growing due to the challenges popularity.

Now, in 2017, her channel has over 160,000 subscribers, 11 million views and she has created over 600 videos since 2008.

BookTube & Publishing

Sanne links her successful BookTube channel to her getting a career in publishing. She currently works as the Social Media producer for Penguin Random House, and she previously worked for Hot Key Books, an imprint of Bonnier, as Digital and Social Media Manager.

With social media being a part of our everyday lives and new jobs within publishing being created specifically to accommodate and utilise it, a background in booktubing and blogging are a growing way to break into the publishing industry. You can read our post on using blogging to get into publishing here.

Along with discussing the benefits of booktubing on her career development, Sanne also discussed the relevance of BookTube to publishers looking to develop their marketing, sales and publicity approaches.

For most booktubers in Britain, booktubing is a hobby that is done alongside a full-time job or education. Out of the close community of booktubers Sanne is a part of, none of them are professional full-time YouTubers. But many of them do have links to the publishing community.

Some are social media producers at other publishing houses, others are writers, booksellers, freelance editors, marketing assistants and more.

BookTube & Publicity

Sanne then discussed how BookTube can help publishing companies publicise books and journals, similarly, if not more so, than blogs and blog tours.

  • YouTube videos often create more comments and discussions than blog posts do.
  • They can last longer than a blog post – imagine writing a 10 minute video into a cohesive blog post.
  • It’s easy to share content and they’re visually appealing
  • Subscribers of booktubers can develop a personal connection with the booktuber, through reading tastes, professionalism and consistency of posting.

BookTube & Sales

As an example, Sanne has procured, roughly, £45,000 for the publishing industry, selling books through an affiliate link to the Book Depository.

She pointed out that this figure is from one affiliate link only. She cannot monitor the amount her subscribers are spending buying books from her recommendations in shops, online or via subscriptions to websites such as Audible.

The topic turned from how booktubers can help to how they should be approached. Since booktubing is a hobby most booktubers will only read and discuss books that they themselves want to read. Sometimes they are sent books and publicity materials from publishers, but rarely accept anything unsolicited. Often publishers will request to send a book to a booktuber, but there is no requirement that they discuss the book on their channel unless they want to.

It is clear from Sanne’s channel and statistics alone that BookTube is incredibly popular and a worthwhile consideration to the development of the publishing industry.

Our YouTube Channel

We are very interested in the topic of BookTube and hearing some tips for starting a channel from Sanne, as we ourselves have a YouTube channel. So far we have created videos on topics such as How to get a Job Interview in PublishingHow to get into Academic Publishing and shared a vlog of our time at the London Book Fair 2017, among others. We’ve recognised the potential of YouTube for the publishing industry and are utilising it for recruitment.

We want to say a big thank you to BookMachine for holding the event, and to Sanne for hosting! Ellie had a great time!

For more information contact us on any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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BookMachine London: All about BookTube

Our administrator Ellie will be attending this Bookmachine event on the 29th March, at the Library in St Martin’s Lane. Learn all about BookTube from an established BookTuber
Sanne Vliegenthart. It is sure to be an interesting evening filled with fascinating new facts and fun!

Let us know if you’re attending by contacting us on any of our social media accounts: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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How to Use Blogging to Get into Publishing

How to use Blogging to get into Publishing

How to Use Blogging to Get into Publishing

How relevant is blogging to publishing? You’d be surprised. Blogging is not a hobby you should start specifically to enter publishing, but if you have one: mention it!

Blogging is a growing hobby, and a new career choice, in the 21st century. Having a blog gives people a platform to discuss what they want and voice their own opinions. But it also gives you the opportunity to work with others across multiple fields of industry. Not to mention develops skills in your own time which can help you in the long-run.

If you’re just starting out and are looking for an entry-level role within publishing, blogging is a great skill to have! So long as you have some work experience to back it up, blogging can tip the balance on whether or not you get an interview or even a job!

There are many different types of blogs, and all can help you gain many skills, from Coding, Design, Marketing, networking and more! But within the Publishing industry specifically book blogging is a very relevant skill!

Book blogging, or booktubing (video blogging), gives you the chance to voice your opinions about books and the latest book trends. A book blogger can write reviews, top ten lists, trend-reviews and more and each of these topics has some relevance to publishing. If you’re an established book blogger you may even work with publishers; taking part in blog tours, hosting giveaways and Q&As and attending book events.

Through communicating with publishers through these events, and voicing your own opinions, shows a potential employee that you understand the industry. You can see trends, converse with professionals and work to deadlines in a creative and independent manner.

This is relevant to all sectors, be it Trade or B2B, and all roles from IT, Editorial, Publicity and more!

It also shows an interest outside of work, which suggests to a future employer that you are a reliable candidate with a keen sense of the publishing industry.

Whether you’re a book blogger or not; blogging is skill to add to your CV!

Here some things you can highlight to show how blogging is useful to you:

  • Commitment: The longer you’ve been blogging the better. This shows commitment and creative thinking, and also proves that you can work well independently.
  • Networking: If you’ve worked with brands or publishers mention it on your CV. Not only does it prove your communicational skills, but also shows an understanding of the industries you mention. This is particularly good if the brands are relevant to the job you’re applying for.
  • Social Media and SEO abilities: Have you got 1000 twitter followers because of your blog publicity? Mention it! Do you understand SEO? Mention it!
  • Coding: If you’ve altered your HTML yourself or have learnt about it then put that down as a skill. For more information about HTML and how to do it, look at our series of posts here!
  •  Design: Did you design your blog, or make your own graphics/headers? Have you got original artwork or worked with others to create artwork? Put it on your CV.

There are so many relevant and useful skills which can be a real pull to employers when looking at CV.

Make sure you have other work experience to back up your blog experiences, but also be sure to highlight the skills you have learnt through blogging! It could mean the difference between getting a job interview and getting a job when you’re first starting out!

Need any more tips about how to enter publishing? Take a look at our Work Experience & Entry-Level Resources!

For more advice, or if you have any questions, get in touch via any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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