Tag Archives: career

The Benefits of Being a Niche Recruitment Agency

Benefits of being a niche recruitment

The Benefits of Being a Niche Recruitment Agency

Today we wanted to share the benefits of registering with a niche recruitment agency like Atwood Tate. We’re a niche agency as we only handle recruitment within the Publishing industry; this includes publishing of books, journals, magazines and online content in these sectors: academic, educational, professional, STM, trade books, business information and events, plus companies that help deliver content (but excluding newspapers or consumer magazines).

Here are some of the benefits of our being a niche agency, and how it can help you find a job within publishing:

1.       Subject Knowledge

Being a niche agency it is particularly useful to have recruitment consultants who have experience in the industry for which we are recruiting. All of our team members have experience in publishing through past careers in Rights, Marketing, Editing and Recruitment at various publishing houses in different sectors, across the globe. This makes us specifically qualified to understand what our clients are looking for in candidates and which skills are relevant on a candidate’s CV for each job.

        2. Networking

Having a team with a past in publishing is also useful in creating contacts and networking! The publishing industry is a particularly friendly industry which often converses through social media and events on a regular basis. Because of our networking and past involvement in the industry we have contacts in nearly all sectors of publishing. As such we are a trusted recruitment agency with an exceptionally strong client list.

        3. Social Media

Since we’re a niche recruitment agency all of our social media and advice posts are focussed around the publishing industry! Whilst our advice on writing CVs and Cover Letters can be applied, mostly, across all industries, are blog posts on Design CVs and YouTube videos on Academic Publishing for example, are tailored to our candidates’ needs and requests!

        4. Strong Candidates

Our clients know that when we send them a CV we are sending them a strong applicant with all the skills required for the role. With our knowledge of the industry and our registration process we can find the perfect role for each candidate, and the perfect candidate for each role. If you haven’t got the skills or experience for a particular job just yet, we can advise you on the right direction to obtain those skills and we work with you throughout your career.

          5. Temps Desk

Temps are an incredibly useful workforce in publishing. They can help cover particularly busy times of the year, such as the London Book Fair, and fill in a role during the recruitment process. Since we’re a specialist niche agency, all of our temps have the necessary skills to come into a publishing company and do the work required without much instruction.

For more information on Atwood Tate’s services and team take a look at look at our website.

You can also contact us via social media: TwitterFacebook, LinkedInYouTube or Instagram.

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Advice from the Careers Clinic

Advice from the Careers Clinic

Advice from the Careers Clinic

Last week two of our consultants, Alison and Karine attended the London Book Fair Careers Clinic, run by bookcareers.com.

For all of those who were unable to attend the book fair or the Careers Clinic we wanted to provide you with the information which was most requested by those that attended.

How to write a Good CV:

We have many blog posts on writing a good CV, which you can read here:

The main things to remember when writing a CV is to include all of your publishing experience and to keep it clean and simple.

You must also remember a Cover Letter. The main thing about a cover letter is that you tailor it to each job you apply for. Try not to over complicate things and keep it as concise as possible.

For more information on cover letters take a look at this blog post:

Work Experience

The most popular questions at the Careers Clinic were about work experience.

We don’t handle work experience or internships. But to gain an entry-level job in publishing you need to have at least 3 month’s work experience in publishing.

You can gain this experience through a work experience placement, internship or through temping.

For more information about temping take a look at this post written by our temp team’s administrator Michael:

Temping is a great way to gain paid work experience, and possibly gain a full-time job upon completion of your contract. If you’re looking for an entry-level role Alison Redfearn and Kellie Millar, our temps team consultants, are your best point of contact at Atwood Tate.

For more information about looking for work experience, internships and other ways to gain experience within publishing we suggest you look at our Work Experience and Entry-Level resources page:

We hope all of this helps you on your career search. We’re always happy to answer any questions you have about gaining experiencing, applying for roles or registering with us online.

To register with Atwood Tate you can upload your CV and preferences here, and we will get back to you with information as soon as possible: Registration page. 

You can also take a look at our publishing resources leaflet which we were handing out at the careers clinic: Publishing Resources Leaflet

If you want to know something in particular get in contact with us on any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Types of Sales Roles in B2B Publishing

Types of Sales Roles B2B

Types of Sales Roles in B2B Publishing

There are many different types of sales roles within publishing. It is worth asking what type of sales role you are applying for, and highlighting which type you’ve done on your CV, when applying for a job.

Our Sales Consultant in the London office, Olivia, has put together a list of the key types of sales roles to explain further.

The key types are:

  • Delegate – selling delegate spaces (i.e. tickets) to attend events and conferences
  • Sponsorship – selling sponsorship opportunities for events. It can also refer to sponsored editorial content, which is when companies pay to publish an article in your publication as a way of promoting their own brand.
  • Advertising – selling advertising space. Can be either print (e.g. a print publication or magazine) or online (eg. a website). It can also be classified (i.e. no graphics, inexpensive small messages) or display (these include graphics and colour and might take up half a page or more).
  • Subscriptions – selling a subscription to a product. Can be print (e.g. a print publication or magazine) or digital (e.g. an online database or service).
  • Conference production – this isn’t really classified as media sales. It’s basically a varied mix of sales, marketing, editorial and project management but for entry level conference production roles clients usually want someone with some sales experience, such as delegate sales.

A B2B Sales role, for example, could involve just one or several of these types of sales. It’s quite common to see delegate and sponsorship sales together or delegate and subscriptions.

Generally the skill set required for each type of sales role, and the types of clients they deal with, will be similar. But it’s always best to check with our consultants beforehand which ones the role involves just to avoid confusion.

For more information about Sales roles you can view our current vacancies page and select Sales in preferences.

You can also contact us on info@atwoodtate.co.uk or 020 7034 7900. Or via social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

 

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Writing a Winning Sales CV

Writing a Winning Sales CV

Writing a Winning Sales CV

Creating the perfect CV is one of the most important things for any job seeker. But particularly so for sales people. Where a journalist can submit samples of their writing or a designer a portfolio of work, as a sales person your CV has to do most of the talking.

Having reviewed many CVs in my time in recruitment, I’ve come to identify what makes an effective and well written CV for sales roles. There are many simple bits of information that candidates miss out which may affect their chances of being considered for a job.

So you don’t make the same mistake, I’ve compiled some guidelines of key things to include!

Whether a second jobber or an experienced sales manager you should include:

  • Sales figures – Where possible you should include details of revenue achieved, targets met, sales made etc… Always make sure they are honest and that you can back them up if asked about them in an interview.
  • Achievements – You should give examples of particular successes you’ve had, whether securing a large deal, signing on a new client…
  • Products & clients – If you’ve worked for a large organisation do specify what area of the business or publication you worked on or what type of products you were selling. It’s also useful to know who you were selling to or specific regions you dealt with.
  • Languages – If you have professional competency in more than one language and would be willing to use it at work, tell us! It might be just what a particular client is looking for.
  • Travel – If you are used to travelling a lot and enjoy it, it’s good to know and if applying for field sales positions, do mention if you have a clean driving licence and car.
  • Line management – If you’ve managed staff, say how many and whether they were office or field based.

Last but not least, being a successful sales person is often very much about your personality so don’t be afraid to let this show on your CV. Also remember that you need strong communication skills and to be well presented and professional so your CV should demonstrate this.

For more general advice on CV layout, you should visit https://atwoodtatepublishingjobs.co.uk/advice/.

If you have any questions get in touch via social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Companies: Why You Should Consider Temps

Why You Should Consider Temps

Companies: Why You Should Consider Temps

Our articles on temping have typically been to inform candidates of the many benefits that come with temping, both professionally and personally. But today, we’d like to point out the many reasons why temping is such a useful avenue for clients to consider.

  • The flexibility of temps also means company flexibility.

If you’re expanding your team but you’re not quite prepared to hire a permanent person, a temporary employee is a great way to establish exactly what it is you need in terms of additional resources. Maybe you’ve never had extra hands on deck and you’re only now starting to realise the new objectives you can tackle. A temp-to-perm scenario can be a match made in heaven for company and employee alike. As someone grows into a newly created role and reveals the kind of results that can be produced with more staff. The manager can then take these results to HR as Exhibit A on what expanding the team can mean for everyone.

But more than that,

  • Temps bring their own expertise with them.

They don’t need to be entry-level candidates acting as a stop-gap. By hiring consultants or veteran freelancers, a company also gets to avail of a temporary worker’s own experiences, the different business practices they’ve witnessed in their time. New blood often means new ideas and even if the worker doesn’t stick around, their contributions can last forever.

And, of course,

  • Temporary workers can provide much needed breathing space to permanent employees.

When the day-to-day administration is taken off their hands, they’re able to concentrate on the bigger picture and implement the projects. This improve service and streamline practices. You can get a lot done when you don’t have to sweat the small stuff. Even if it’s only for a little while.

So, for anyone who’s currently reviewing team numbers or work-loads, don’t commit until you know for sure exactly what you need – try a temp today! Get in touch with Kellie Millar, who manages our Temps and Freelancers desk, or her colleague, Alison Redfearn, and they can send you more workers than you can shake a stick at!

5 reasons to get a temp:

  • Cover sick leave
  • Cover holiday
  • Help with a project
  • Flexibility – have for 1 day / 1 week / 1 month…
  • No admin – we cover all payment, NI, holiday pay, pension

Kellie Millar
E: kelliemillar@atwoodtate.co.uk
Tel: 02070347897

Alison Redfearn
E: alisonredfearn@atwoodtate.co.uk
Tel: 02070347922

You can also contact us with any questions via our social media pages: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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The Academic Publishing Sector

Academic Publishing Header

Academic Publishing

In keeping with Academic Book Week (#AcBookWeek), today’s blog we’re discussing the Academic Sector in all its glory.

Most candidates, particularly new candidates to publishing, tend to overlook academic publishing. But Academic Publishing is a cutting edge and often a very exciting sector to work in!

An academic publisher publishes journals, books, articles and monographs on the latest findings within academic research. The content is often written by researchers and academics within a specific area of research – such as historians, doctors and scientists – and it is normally peer reviewed by fellow scholars of the same topic.

There is a lot of crossover between Academic Publishing and STM (Science, Technical, Medical) but we categorise them into two separate sectors at Atwood Tate.

Suitability within Academic Publishing

Many fields within academia have their own publications in which to publish their findings. These are the societies and publishers for which you would be applying to work for.

As such a degree, PhD, or a background within non-fiction publishing, or an evidential interest in a topic of academia, is preferable to many employers within academic publishing. Some more so than others. It often depends on the specifics of a role.

For an entry-level role in Academic publishing we recommend you gain as much as admin experience as possible. With regards to sales, design, marketing and other roles within publishing, a clear interest in academic publishing can be enough to be considered for a role. Also, if you have experience working within the higher education sector in some way this can also be useful. It shows a developed insight into the academic market and customers.

The skills and academic background required is dependent on the publisher in question.

If we have a role within academic publishing which you are interested in but are unsure of the qualifications required, feel free to ask us for clarification. We will be able to let you know what is required and discuss the role further.

What type of Publishers are Academic Publishers:

There are many different types of academic publishers. Here are some examples of the companies we’ve worked with before.

Many University establishments have their own academic presses, such as:

  • Oxford University Press
  • Manchester University Press
  • Cambridge University Press

But there are also societies and specific academic publishers, such as:

  • The Biochemical Society
  • Elsevier
  • Taylor & Francis
  • Springer

These are just some of many Academic Publishers in the UK, some of which have positions internationally as well.

Due to the exciting nature of the published content within academic publishing, this is a great sector in which to have a career. You can work on the latest research and publish exciting findings across many different topics. You can also work in an industry which is very often ahead of other publishing sectors, in terms of publishing innovations such as digital publishing, online platforms etc. It is as intellectually challenging as it is creative.

Interested in a role in Academic Publishing? Want to know more about the sector? Get in touch:

And make sure you check out the Twitter Feed and official website for #AcBookWeek.

Let us know what you would like to learn about next on our blog on our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Academic Book Week (#AcBookWeek)

Academic Book Week

Academic Book Week – 23rd-28th January

From the 23rd – 28th of January it is Academic Book Week (#AcBookWeek)! The world of Publishing will be celebrating the diversity, innovation and influence of Academic Books!

Here at Atwood Tate we thought we would take part by informing you about the Academic Publishing sector!

During the week we shall be running some small events to coincide with the official #AcBookWeek events, which you can read about here! All the events have been officiated by Midas PR who are running the event along with the Publisher’s Association, the British Library and many others!

What Are We Doing?

On Monday 23rd we will be releasing specifically themed Instagram posts about working in Academic Publishing and the skills required to enter.

On Tuesday 24th, our two academic publishing consultants: Christina Dimitriadi & Lisa Smars will be running a Twitter Q&A! From 12:30-1:00pm! Use the hashtag #AcBookWeek and tag @AtwoodTate to take part! They will be answering all your questions on CVs, Skills, the Academic sector and more!

On Wednesday 25th we shall be releasing further Instagram photos and filming our YouTube video! As well as releasing an Academic Publishing Infographic!

On Thursday 26th we will have a special guest post from an Academic Publishing Professional on our blog!

And finally, on Friday 27th we will be releasing a YouTube video about the Academic Sector!

If you have any questions, or want to get involved with #AcBookWeek, make sure you follow the hashtag and the official Academic Book Week twitter page!

This is the perfect time to ask your questions and network with professionals in the publishing sector! As well as attend events about academic publishing and receive discounts on academic books!

We can’t wait to take part!

Are you going to join in with #AcBookWeek? Let us know on any of our social media accounts: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

And be sure to keep your eye on our own Twitter feed and blog as we participate in this fun week!

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Information Security and the world of publishing

information-security-the-world-of-publishing

Information Security and the world of publishing

Before I started out in recruitment, my publishing roots were in rights and licensing and my role was to ensure companies that re-used our content for commercial use was copyright compliant i.e. they paid for it.

Fast forward some years and I find myself speaking to candidates that work in information security (in fact, my first placement in recruitment was a senior information security role) and, although the two things are completely separate, there are some similarities.

The first being that in both verticals you’re protecting something, whether that be content or data and systems and the second is that you’re retaining the commercial value so that you (the owner) are the only one that capitalises on it.

That aside, and moving more on to the point, we’ve all seen what’s happened in recent years; corporations of all different sizes being hacked of commercial and private content, even recently a well-known search engine having had up to a billion of its users’ details accessed and even as far as the Russians tampering with the US presidential vote.

The financial services industry is all over information / cyber security and has been for some time now but then they have to be as they have to look after our money after all or, if failure to do so, face severe penalties.

But are publishers doing enough?

Yes they don’t have our personal money, but they do put substantial time and effort into creating and curating content (not alone the monetary value) that enrich our lives on so many levels and not to mention the data they have from us as consumers and all the systems and technology that support this content digitally.

The bigger players out there are scaling up their information security departments to protect what they own but is the industry as a whole keeping up? As many publishers move into a more ‘direct to consumer’ relationship with customers this will be even more crucial.

Additionally, on the 25th May 2018, the UK government will be applying the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) which will introduce a new legal framework surrounding the use of personal data with the consequences of misuse resulting in huge fines.

But rest assured, Atwood Tate can provide the most appropriate resource and help with the compliance burden, whether that be in a permanent or interim capacity.

So should you be looking to get ready for the upcoming GDPR or want to ensure your technology and content is secure, we can assist in areas such as:

  • Data protection
  • Audit and regulatory compliance (ISO27001, PCI-DSS etc.)
  • Infrastructure security design
  • 3rd party supplier assurance
  • Programme and project assurance
  • Controls and access management
  • Threat management
  • Vulnerability assessment

On that note, have a happy Christmas and look forward to speaking to you in the New Year.

What are your thoughts on this topic? Let us know on Social Media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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