Tag Archives: Conference

IPG’s Annual Spring Conference & Independent Publishing Awards

On the 8th-10th of February the IPG Spring Conference will be running in Oxfordshire! For more details check out the official IPG website!

They’ll be keynote speakers, conferences, events and networking opportunities. As well as the awards in the evening! A great event!

Let us know if you’re attending the IPG’s Annual Spring Conference on our social media sites: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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5 Reasons Why You Should Attend the London Book Fair 2017

London Book Fair 2017

5 Reasons Why You Should Attend the London Book Fair 2017

The London Book Fair 2017 is fast approaching. It will be happening on the 14th-16th of March at the beautiful Olympia in Hammersmith.

It is an opportunity for all those in the publishing industry to meet and discuss publishing, with the main focus of the fair being on the literary agents as they sell book rights in the International Rights Centre. This is an event to learn, observe and discover the latest trends within publishing, with a lot of publishing’s finest under one roof.

The exhibition floors will be filled with publishers, agents, recruitment consultants and writers. It is a brilliant place to mingle and learn more about the publishing industry if you any, or wanting to be, any of the above.

Here are 5 Reasons why you should attend the London Book Fair:

  • There is a Careers Clinic and recruitment agencies attending

Bring your CV and book a place at the Career’s Clinic. At the clinic you get 5 minutes to speak to a specialist recruitment agent who can discuss jobs and offer advice, and even take your CV for further review.

We will be attending the Careers Clinic, as we did last year, with our consultants offering advice. More info on this over the next few weeks!

Recruitment agencies will also have their own stands throughout the fair, at which you can approach them for a chat.

  • Networking Opportunities

Yes, that dreaded word appears again. The London Book Fair has a busy atmosphere, but it is the perfect place to meet people within the publishing industry, and ask questions where suitable.

Each publisher within the industry will have their own stand, but there are other opportunities to network as well: seminars, meetings and clinics. Also queues! The queues for food can sometimes get quite large but you can always strike up a conversation at this point. Be open and friendly.

For more advice on Networking check out this blog post our temps team administrator Michael did!

  • Seminars & Meetings

The London Book Fair also includes seminars and discussions for anyone to attend. Some require paid tickets, but most are free – but you do need to book beforehand! Check out the LBF Insight Guide for a look at all of the seminars at the event!

You could attend the Byte the Book Networking event on the 14th of March or attend the Careers Clinic. Or, if you’re a writer, book a meeting with the Society of Authors.

  • The Publishing Sectors

The London Book Fair is the perfect opportunity to learn more about all the sectors of publishing. From Academic to B2B, Trade to Print and Production.

From viewing the stands to networking with the stand-holders, this is a great opportunity to learn more about the publishing industry as a whole. With over 2000 exhibitors over three days this is a fascinating experience for anyone looking to enter the publishing world.

  • Attend with Friends

This is a great event to attend with fellow publishing candidates, be it already in publishing or looking to enter the industry. It can be a lot easier to mingle with others when you have a friend to go with you, and the event is quite social.

You can always grab a coffee or some food at one of the many cafes, discuss the event, walk around together or attend seminars together. It is much a social event as it is a professional one.

Make sure you book your LBF ticket in advance though. Tickets cost £40 per person for the three day fair. Book here!

So there are 5 reasons to attend the London Book Fair 2017. We will be releasing more information as we creep nearer to the event! And we can’t wait to see you at the Careers Clinic. Don’t leave it too long before you book your place at the clinic, these places tend to go quickly!

Want to learn more about the London Book Fair? Check out there website or follow them on Twitter. They will be live tweeting throughout the day, as will many other publishers, so keep an eye on social media over the week.

You can also follow us on social media to stay up to date: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Building Inclusivity in Publishing

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Our pledge to help publishing to build inclusivity

Last month The London Book Fair, in partnership with The Publishers Association, held a conference on Building Inclusivity. I attended the event for Atwood Tate, because in our role as a publishing recruitment agency we have a responsibility to ensure recruitment processes are inclusive and offer all suitable candidates an equal opportunity to be considered for a role.

As members of the Recruitment and Employment Confederation, we adhere to its Code of Professional Practice.  A respect for diversity is one of the main guiding principles of this code. We adhere to all applicable legislation, encourage equal opportunities in recruitment and establish working practices to safeguard against prejudice.

Over the past few weeks, I have been reflecting on the thoughts and insights that were shared at the Building Inclusivity event.  To start with, in using the word “inclusivity” rather than “diversity” the organisers of the event were clearly trying to drive on the tired conversation which has been stalling for a long time in the publishing industry.  Semantics can have a strong effect and I did feel that there was renewed energy and determination shown by speakers and delegates at the conference.  There was a focus openness and accessibility rather than a defining of differences and analysis of the norm versus the “other” in the publishing industry as things stand.

In her keynote speech, Crystal Mahey-Morgan, founder of OWN IT!, reminded us that books lead to readers developing empathy, and empathy leads to humanity.  I only learned about this proven link between reading and the development of empathy and morals when reading Maryanne Wolf’s wonderful Proust and the Squid (which incidentally I would recommend to anyone interested in literacy, reading, neurology and sociology), so whilst a lot of people in the book industry may know about the importance of reading for society, Mahey-Morgan’s words were a powerful reminder.

Charities like Beanstalk do important work in getting into schools to promote reading to all, but I know from observing my own children learning to read, that in order for a person to want to read, the content needs to be engaging and interesting.  None of us expect our friends and family to necessarily share all of our interests or preferences, so we already accept a variety of genres and content, but the consensus at the Building Inclusivity conference was that the books published in the UK are not wholly representative of our society or meeting its needs.

Recruitment & Inclusivity

It was clearly felt that there is a correlation between what is published and who is working in publishing and that’s where the recruitment side of things comes into play.  The industry needs to be more than just “open” to recruiting from outside of the traditional profile of publishing people but needs to make an effort to demonstrate the desire to be inclusive and take measure to increase accessibility to a wider pool of prospective employees.

At the conference, employers were encouraged to make a pledge as what measures they would aim to take after the conference in order to play an active part in creating a publishing industry that is inclusive and representative of our society as a whole.

My pledge on the day to do more at the grass roots level with Beanstalk was inspired by looking at what we could do personally at Atwood Tate to help bring a love of reading to a wider range of children.  Crystal Mahey-Morgan’s words about humanity and the story of author Robyn Travis struck a chord with me, as a governor at a primary school in a deprived area, where a lot of children a brought up in homes without books.

However, we at Atwood Tate also want to make it our pledge to ensure that we are providing as much advice and support to our publisher clients, as possible to help them to promote equal opportunities in recruitment and share ideas as to how to establish working practices to safeguard against prejudice and promote inclusivity and equality.

We are not HR consultants or expert advisors, but we can offer the following:

  • As trained members of the REC, we all have a solid understanding of all applicable legislation and Atwood Tate embraces diversity and seeks to promote the benefits of diversity in all of our business activities and to develop a business culture that reflects that belief.
  • Through our daily work and attending industry events and REC round table meetings we keep up to date with new trends and initiatives. We can share the knowledge and insight we have about what is being done in publishing and other industries to improve inclusivity in recruitment processes.
  • We are expert at writing engaging and non-discriminatory job advertisements and we are able to advertise widely and reach out to candidates outside of the publishers traditional networks.

What are your thoughts on inclusivity in publishing? Let us know in the comments below or contact us on our social media sites: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or Instagram.

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PPA Independent Publisher Conference & Awards 2016

Our B2B/STM consultant Karine Nicpon and Design consultant Lucy Slater will be attending the PPA Independent Publisher Conference & Awards event at the Park Plaza Riverbank on the 8th December!

The Conference will take place in the morning and the awards being from 1:30pm. It is set to be a really lovely and insightful day and we can’t wait to hear all of the news!

If you are attending the event let us know on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or Instagram! If you see Karine and Lucy while you are there be sure to say hello! We would love to hear from you!

 

 

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Break into Publishing: Networking

Breaking into publishing: Networking

Common Symptom #2: Networking

Speak Softly and Carry a Big Book

You’re at a fancy venue. You have a glass of wine in your hand, maybe some food or maybe only the fond memory of food at this point, you’ve been standing here so long, watching, waiting, trying to find an in, an opening, a shot – that’s right, you’re networking.

Networking in publishing can be a fairly daunting prospect, especially for young graduates. It’s difficult to be assertive when you don’t claim to be an expert on anything this early in your career. And if you’re quiet and retiring, you’re not exactly going to make a lasting impression. But it’s a worthwhile endeavour so it’s important to try.

As we’ve previously covered in our work experience blog, publishing is a saturated market so you will always have to run a little faster, climb a little higher, work just that little bit harder, to make any headway. It can be bitter pill to swallow but it comes back to how badly you want it.

The important thing to remember is that, believe it or not, networking in the publishing world can actually be quite fun! It’s a chance to mingle with like-minded people who know your struggle and are usually quite helpful in offering advice or tips. A memorable conversation can go a long way. What starts as an observation about the venue or your journey there can lead to suggestions and introductions you could not have come across in any online search you might try. Take a business card, take two! Take as many as you can until you have a winning hand. And if you have your own cards, even better.

Events

There are great events happening all the time, from Christmas parties to pub quizzes, hosted by a variety of societies and institutes, all of them masters at bringing people together for a night of fun and games while also creating an ideal space for networking.

And don’t worry, if networking doesn’t come naturally to you, remember that, like everything it gets easier the more you do it. You don’t need to own the room, you can be yourself and let your passion show through. Think of talking points in advance to help break the ice, familiarise yourself with publishers and who their authors are so you can show you know their company and what they’re about.

Next step? Sign up to newsletters, check out websites like the SYP, Bookseller, BookMachine, then pencil in some dates – who knows, it’s possible you could bump into one of our staff making the rounds and we might be just the person who can help you!

If you have a question in need of answering, about networking or other work experience related questions, let us know on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or LinkedIn!

 

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SYP: How to Make a Bestseller 2016

SYP: How to Make a Bestseller 2016

On the 26th of November our Senior Recruitment Consultant Karine Nicpon will be attending the SYP: How to Make a Bestseller Conference.

It is sure to be an insightful day and one that we can’t wait to hear all about! If you’re attending let us know via Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or Instagram and be sure to say hello to Karine if you see her!

 

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Rave Technologies – Annual Publishing Conference 2016

Rave Technologies - Annual Publishing Conference 2016

On the 8th of November,  Karine and David, attended the Annual Publishing Conference 2016, hosted by Rave Technologies. David attended the morning and Karine the afternoon.

Speakers: Annual Publishing Conference

The Next 15 Years

David’s talk, amongst other things, was an interesting insight into the future of technologies and how this could benefit us or possibly hinder us.

He spoke about why some companies had failed in the last 15 years as they had not kept a breast with up to date technologies and why some had not because they had done! And the pattern would continue for the next 15 years if we all don’t get on board the rapid moving technological landscape.

Another point he raised is information/cyber security both in publishing (how there needs to be more awareness of it) and in our everyday life as the number of gadgets we use increase.

Implementing a Content Enrichment – The easy way, or the right way

Jason, Director, Platform Capabilities at Wiley gave guidance on how to implement a content enrichment strategy. The idea is to enrich digital content as to make it more valuable to the publisher.

This could include related article services to grouping together content so that it can be used for multiple purposes such as SEO and TDM services.

Going beyond Content is the Secret to your Success

Paul spoke about how to really know your customers through the enhancement of data and, by doing this, knowing what products your customers want (and will ultimately purchase!).

In a nutshell, this is done by analysing the digital footprint of your customer; what their purchase history looks like, their demographic etc. (the list is endless, these are just two examples), you then can tailor products, services and campaigns to they want.

What happens when you involve users in developing your products?

Sharon Cooper, Chief Digital Officer for the BMJ, gave an interesting talk on how their digital products need to be designed in line with user needs. But how do they know their individual user needs? What could be a good function for one may not be good for another.

Well, the conclusion to this, is to involve the actual users on their specific needs across the whole spectrum of the medical industry from student to GP and management. They are then able to get an idea of the requirements and build in the functionalities for the relevant level.

Secondly, hold a Design Sprint, where you take 5 people from different sectors of the business (sales, technology etc.) and take 5 days out to road map the product as follows:

Day 1: UNPACK

Share knowledge, common understanding of the design challenge and define metrics.

Day2: SKETCH

Generate ideas and variations, critique and weighted voting.

Day 3: DECIDE

Conflicts and assumptions, storyboard and plan prototype.

Day 4: PROTOTYPE

Build a realistic version of the storyboard.

Day 5: TEST

Validate with real users and determine how people understand your product.

Did you attend the Publishing Conference at Rave Technologies? If so let us know in a comment below or send us a message on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or Instagram!

 

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Equal Opportunity and Diversity in Publishing

 

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Building Inclusivity in Publishing Event

On the 15th November our consultant Helen will be attending the Building Inclusivity in Publishing event, run by the Publishers Association and the London Book Fair.

The day-long conference will look at each component of the publishing industry and the representation of people in each area, from authors to consumers.

The day will encourage the attendees to re-evaluate their ideas of diversity and to see who the real audience are, by drawing on positive examples and personal experiences! By the end of the conference the attendees will know how to build inclusivity within the publishing industry!

As an Equal Opportunities company Atwood Tate are very keen on spreading the word on inclusivity throughout Publishing! Within our company we never discriminate against the candidates, clients or employees we work with, we encourage diversity in publishing! For more information on our Equal Opportunities and Diversity policy click here.

The Inclusivity conference will include panels and speakers from all areas of publishing, including authors, agents and booksellers. Here’s the Conference Programme.

Speakers Include:

  • Crystal Mahey-Morgan, founder, OWN IT! Publishing
  • Robyn Travis, author, Mama Can’t Raise No Man
  • Tim Hely Hutchinson, Group CEO, Hachette UK
  • Louise Clarke, Latimer Group
  • Diana Broccardo, Profile Books
  • Emad Ahmed, Creative Access and ex-News Statesman
  • Sunny Singh, academic and author, co-founder Jhalak Prize
  • Siena Parker, Penguin Random House
  • Jessica Kingsley, Jessica Kingsley Publishers
  • Jazzmine Breary, Jacaranda

And many others! For a full list of speakers see here! Conference Speakers.

The panels and case studies look fascinating and we can’t wait to hear the thoughts of everyone who attends!

Be sure to watch out in the days after the conference for a summary blog about the event and the level of inclusivity in publishing, and please say hello to Helen if you see her!

In the meantime we will be on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram to cover the conference! Let us know if you’re attending.

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PPA Master Class: The Marketing One Summary

 

ppa-masterclass

The PPA recently launched a new series of half day conferences specifically for senior professionals, and last Friday was one for Marketing.

A range of professionals from across the industry came together to share their experiences in a morning ably chaired by Ruth Mortimer, Content Director, Centaur Media. The first panel focused on the key skills the panel of Caroline Hird  (BMJ), Kendal Mott (Procurement Leaders), and Ian McGowan, (Merit Group) felt marketing professionals needed. Marketing automation, data analytics, and strategic thinkers were all things the panel felt were crucial. Indeed, these three things were mentioned repeatedly throughout the morning.

Nick Varney and Amanda Munoz of Dow Jones, then led a panel discussing subscriptions, using their experience with the Wall Street Journal as an example to illustrate how membership can revitalise revenue streams. The importance of personalisation, exclusivity of content, and engendering a sense of customer loyalty were the key take-aways from this panel.

Caroline Hird, Marketing Director of the BMJ spoke on the importance of community and driving customer engagement to increase revenues, build customer loyalty, and drive innovation. Caroline’s three key points about communities:

1)    Be clear why you are doing this – and be able to report on your successes (and failures)

2)    Have a unique value proposition – know your niche and offer them something they cannot get elsewhere

3)    Be focused – just because you can do something, it doesn’t mean you should

Nik Dinning, Marketing Director of Retail Week/New Civil Engineer explored how using targeted content strategies – both exploiting back catalogue content and developing new partner content – to drive revenue and substantial return on investment. Again, Nik talked about the importance of knowing your niche and doing your research to find out what the market wants.

Lastly, Ruth Mortimer looked at the difference between customer engagement and customer numbers, driving home the message that a targeted group of engaged consumers can be vastly more valuable than a high CPM. She also talked a little about the importance of measuring the right things to help make fully informed marketing choices.

All-in-all it was a fascinating morning, and if you get the opportunity to go to the Tech & Data one in November, do so!

Make sure to let us know if you attended the conference on twitter @AtwoodTate 

Now if you’ll excuse me, I am off to read Mary Meeker’s 2016 Internet Trends  because Ruth Mortimer told me to!

 

 

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ALPSP Conference 2016

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Three weeks ago Claire and I attended the annual ALPSP conference, which brings together a large number of scholarly and professional publishing professionals from across the UK and overseas. The conference was hosted over three days (14-16th September) and delegates were treated to a packed schedule of presentations, panel discussions and networking opportunities.

The key discussion points at the conference were:

  • The disruption caused by digital developments, which affect the publishing industry as a whole, and how companies can future proof their brands and products. We should let technology lead, not disrupt.
  • Metrics and the ever-expanding range available. How can Metrics be used to measure publication performance as well as other research outputs and activities. What is the future of research evaluation?
  • The evolution of peer review and its relevance today. How can peer review be used effectively in different communities, if at all. How is peer review used outside of scientific publications and what specifics should it address.
  • The data revolution and the implications this has. Publishers can’t solely be content businesses. They need to be innovative and become technology companies to stay relevant.

On the second night of the conference the ALPSP Awards were hosted. The Award for Contribution to Scholarly Publishing was given to Alice Meadows, Director of Community Engagement and Support at ORCID. Awards for Innovation were given to Cartoon Abstracts by Taylor & Francis and Wiley ChemPlanner.

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The ALPSP Winners – Image attributed to ALPSP – http://alpsp.org/ALPSP-Awards

You can download the full conference programme and view the video footage at http://www.alpsp.org/2016-Programme.

Next year’s conference is being hosted in the Netherlands. We’ll see you there!

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