Tag Archives: electronic publishing

Guest Post: What will defy, embrace or become a disruption in scholarly publishing?

We are thrilled to bring you a guest post on our blog from Jessica Edwards, as she reflects her thoughts on the BookMachine’s recent event, ‘Scholarly Publishing: Crossing the Rubicon’.

What will defy, embrace or become a disruption in scholarly publishing?

Thoughts from BookMachine’s latest event

‘Scholarly Publishing: Crossing the Rubicon’

By Jessica Edwards

The Jam Factory, Oxford, 7 September 2017

Image courtesy of Michael Belcher, Marketing Manager at Ingenta

Image courtesy of Michael Belcher, Marketing Manager at Ingenta

Last Thursday, as I trundled slowly towards Oxford (kicking myself for accidentally catching a slow train – who knew there were quite so many stations between Reading and Oxford?!) I wondered what was in store at BookMachine’s latest event, ‘Scholarly Publishing: Crossing the Rubicon’. Arriving at The Jam Factory, I scanned the room of busily-networking people and took a deep breath. Although I’ve now worked in publishing for over 2 years, and always enjoy chatting to inspired publishing-types, a few seconds of panic always descends when, turning from the table of beverages, glass in hand, the reality hits that one must shuffle into a group at random and strike up a conversation. Thankfully, I was lucky enough to approach two lovely individuals from Atwood Tate – Claire Louise Kemp and Alice Crick. Not only were they extremely friendly, our conversation (and Claire Louise spotting me scribbling notes during the panel discussion) led to the suggestion, offer, and composition of this blog post!

My name’s Jess Edwards, and I’m currently Marketing Executive at Gale, a Cengage Company. Gale creates digital resources (from journal and eBook databases to digital archives) for academic, special, school and government libraries worldwide. Consequently, when the advert for BookMachine’s scholarly publishing seminar popped into my inbox, it not only looked interesting but extremely relevant to my current position, and I quickly purchased an early-bird ticket!

There were four engaging speakers on the panel. Phill Jones, Director of Innovation at Digital Science, a company who invest and nurture research start-ups creating software to aid scientific research; Charlie Rapple, Sales & Marketing Director and co-founder of Kudos, a platform which increases research impact by driving discovery and facilitating the sharing of academic work; Byron Russell, Head of Ingenta Connect, a publisher-facing content management system that enables publishers to convert, store and deliver digital content; and Duncan Campbell, Director of Digital Licensing and Sales Partnerships at John Wiley & Sons, ranked ninth on the Publisher’s Weekly list of the world’s 50 largest publishers, 2017. Bringing together speakers (and an audience) from both large, established publishers and newer, often technology-based start-ups, led to some interesting discussion on the relationships between the two; the responsibilities of each; and whether one or the other is best placed to cope with the disruptive forces in publishing – or themselves be disruptive.

The discussion generated by the panel was wide-ranging and insightful, broadening my understanding of the challenges, relationships and roles in publishing beyond my own. It made me think more deeply about the hugely influential and clearly disruptive issues looming over the industry, as well as the ideas and innovations which currently exist around the edges of the industry, meeting niche requirements today, but which could, in time, disrupt, engulf or evolve the whole publishing landscape.

Insights and topics of discussion that I found particularly intriguing include:

  • The symbiotic relationship between start-ups and established publishers

The opening discussion about innovation in publishing included the suggestion that it is more difficult for established companies to innovate – something easier for new-comers. However, there was also an agreement that innovation is a necessity at every tier of the industry. The conversation moved on to the common practice of publishers supporting innovation elsewhere; encouraging and funding the technological start-ups often responsible for floating fresh new ideas. The arguments were put forward that these start-ups rely on funding and support from the publishing establishment, who had a responsibility to nurture them. Yet the establishment in turn rely on the innovation of the start-ups for their own development and evolution – often acquiring them down-the-line as part of their innovation strategy – thus the relationship could be described as cyclical or symbiotic.

  • Piracy V. Green OA

Although I was relatively familiar with the term ‘Open Access’, I was not with ‘Green OA’. (This was one of the things I was inspired to google following the event, and consequently am now aware of both green and gold OA!) Reference to green OA was made in discussion of the threat and disruptive nature of piracy in the publishing industry. There was also consideration of how attitudes towards sharing have changed over time – and where the fine line now sits between piracy and OA. It was suggested that in the past, if one academic was to email an article to another based elsewhere, it would have been seen by publishers as an infringement of copyright. Now, perceptions of sharing have evolved, with the industry instead taking an observational approach; monitoring such behaviours with the intent to better understand the market. The distinction was made, however, and agreed upon unanimously by the panel, that sharing on a need-to-know basis remains different from mass-uploads by networks such as Sci-Hub. Yet it was also recognised that such ‘dark’ enterprises are also examples of innovation forcing the publishing industry to evolve. The disruptive impact of such ‘dark’ innovation was nicely summarised by Phill Jones: ‘It has forced the agenda, but at the same time, it’s not the solution.’

It’s testament to how packed, insightful and content-rich the discussion was that I could go on…! However, this blog post is already heading towards classification as a tome, so I won’t elaborate on the other interesting discussions, though will squeeze in that these included the impact of new business models such as ‘Netflix for journal articles’(!), how a trend towards trans-disciplinary research and developments in research evaluation will affect publishing, and the future of Discovery Systems.

All-in-all, I highly recommend anyone interested in learning more about a particular area of publishing, or the industry in general, goes along to a BookMachine event. Absorb what the experts have to say – it will almost certainly come in useful in the not-so-distant future – and meander your way into a conversation during the networking drinks – who knows what connections you’ll make, you might even end up writing a blog post for somebody!

A little like Where’s Wally…spot me in the stripey top! Image courtesy of Michael Belcher, Marketing Manager at Ingenta.

A little like Where’s Wally…spot me in the stripey top! Image courtesy of Michael Belcher, Marketing Manager at Ingenta.

Nb. All views are my own, and not those of Gale, Atwood Tate, or BookMachine. If I have misrepresented any of the discussion or speakers’ arguments, this is down to my own misunderstanding.

Twitter @Jessica2Edwards

https://www.linkedin.com/in/jessicaedwards1/

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BIC Seminar: New Trends in Publishing (part 2)

As promised last week, we’ll focus this time on the impact that New Trends in Publishing (#bicnewtrends @BIC1UK)  can have on production departments and suppliers such as printers. Mike Levaggi is Group Production Director at HarperCollins and he came to the BIC Seminar to tell us a bit more about the digital print revolution.

Publishing is changing, I think we’re all aware of that. There is an increasing number of titles and a decreasing run length: publishers tend to print short runs to adapt to their business model.

Slide 3

© Mike Levaggi & HarperCollins

E-books and e-readers create extensive back lists and encourage print on demand. In this context, digital print is growing rapidly and is replacing offset printing. Print on demand requires publishers to move fast: you don’t print a book unless there is an order for it (“book of one”, down to one copy). The same way short print runs have increased changeover time and put pressure on conventional printing. Print runs are getting shorter and smaller orders are driving administrative issues for both printer and publisher which changes the workflows in production departments.

Slide 4

© Mike Levaggi & HarperCollins

To face these changes, printers and manufacturers are tooling up, investing in a range of digital technologies to be able to print faster and shorter at a better cost. Inkjet quality is improving, as well as costs. Equipment suppliers work on higher resolution.

Digital printing is a lot faster, it increases flexibility and minimises turnaround times. Digital accelerates cash-flows.

© Mike Levaggi & HarperCollins

© Mike Levaggi & HarperCollins

What’s next? Mike has been talking to a lot of publishing professionals, printers and suppliers and according to them, the industry is facing the biggest change since print moved from film to computer. The technology will continue to improve, driving cost and quality benefits. More titles will be kept available without increasing inventory. Workflows will develop rapidly in all parts of the supply chain. And the pace of change is going to be increased.

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BIC Seminar: New Trends in Publishing

I was very pleased to attend the BIC Seminar about New Trends in Publishing last Wednesday (#bicnewtrends @BIC1UK). We were invited in the very impressive Stationers’ Hall to hear all about the latest trends in publishing and what we can expect for the future.

Chris McCrudden (Head of Technology and New Media at Midas PR) and Jane Tappuni (Executive Vice President of Business Development at Publishing Technology) got the ball rolling, revealing the 5 top trends in trade publishing nowadays.

The first one is “Direct to Consumer Publishing”: to grow publishers’ need to understand and find out who their customers are. All publishers know how to cultivate their B2C relationships. A good example of this is what HarperCollins did with their virtual Romance festival last year. This was a clever way to develop their relationship marketing and to build their community activity. Publishers also focus on creating buying opportunities (D2C ecommerce) and leveraging their brand offer (memberships).

The second top trend is “Mobile reading”: 14 million Kindles and 2.5 billion mobile reading devices were sold in 2015. Are people reading on their mobile phone? Yes, they are!

BIC 1

Phones are getting bigger and bigger and reading on a mobile is getting more and more comfortable.

BIC 2

There are now publishers creating specific content for mobile reading.

The third top trend in Trade publishing is “The Power of Fandom”. If you haven’t heard of it yet (where were you?), fandom is basically people creating content on fan fiction websites. I can hear you say “Why should we take this seriously?” As Chris and Jane pointed out, millions of people create and consume fan fiction. Wattpad, a host for fan fiction content, counts 40 million users! And when fan fiction hits the mainstream it goes big! The best example of that is Fifty Shades of Grey. It started life as a piece of Twilight fan fiction and we know what happened next…

The fourth trend is “Growing pains for eBook subscription”. Chris and Jane revealed that if the book subscription services have grown they haven’t grown quickly enough. Most of the members consume a lot of books and this doesn’t generate a lot of money.

The last top trend fiction is “Content as Marketing”: authors have been creating content that brands would pay for: Jonathan Safran Foer and Toni Morrison wrote original content for coffee cups:

BIC 3

These are the 5 top trends in trade publishing according to Chris and Jane. It is quite fascinating to see how the industry evolves and we’ll see in the part 2 of this blogs how this evolution impacts other parts of the business such as printers.

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Tech Talks

Tech Talks: Ecommerce is Moving into Content PPA HQ 16th June 2015, one of the PPA’s Digital Masterclass Series

The PPA is inviting publishers to take part in Tech Talks – a new series of digital masterclasses for PPA members. Each of the Tech Talks sessions focuses on a specific area of digital publishing.

Ecommerce is Moving into Content
Since Amazon emerged in the late 90s, there has not been much change in eCommerce. However, a new trend is emerging, and the largest digital publishers and platforms are introducing features and solutions, enabling users to buy what they read about, without leaving the site – reversing the flow, so the shopping experience is brought to the user, rather than redirecting the user to the shop.
This was a fascinating presentation by Simon Goldschmidt, the CEO of Atosho, which, in 2011, was the first company to launch a platform for “distributed ecommerce”.
We heard how publishers are monetising content in a different way, driving revenue as well as increasing reader engagement, by providing an integrated service.
It is hard convincing your readers to change their buying habits, and, no surprise, Google is leading the way here. But publishers such as Condé Nast are also climbing on the bandwagon.
Seasonality is key and typical purchases include DIY, beauty, home and garden and some fashion.
For the consumer, it’s a convenient and seamless purchasing experience that is offered to them when they are “inspired” to make a purchase.
Content matters – readers are more likely to make a purchase that is embedded in, for instance, the pieces written by their favourite sports journalist.
For the publisher, it is a good way to monetise what would otherwise be free content.
I’m sure we’ll all be hearing much more about this in the future!

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Scholarly Social

Alison and I headed over to King’s Cross on 19th May for the latest instalment of Scholarly Social.  It was our first time at this event and we’d really recommend it to anyone working in and around academic / STM publishing.  It was a really well organised (and free!) event with a great range of speakers plus the chance to network with your peers.

As they say, it’s ‘an open and collaborative space to share ideas and make connections. We host social gatherings where you can make new connections with people involved in scholarly communication or catch up with old friends.  You don’t represent your organisation, just your individual self, and everyone connected to scholarly communication is welcome, including publishers, librarians, researchers, consultants, intermediaries, and students.’

This event was in association with #futurepub (from Overleaf) who have hosted #futurepub 5 as part of the Pint of Science Festival.  We had the pleasure of 6 x 5 minute talks from mainly start-up companies focussed on the future of scientific publishing.

Thanks to Bernie FolanGinny Hendricks for organising. Contact Scholarly Social

Speakers were:

Eva Amsen, Community Strategy Manager for Faculty of 1000

F1000 has just launched F1000Workspace, where researchers can collect, cite and discuss scientific literature with their colleagues.

James Harwood, Co-founder of Penelope (automated manuscript screening)

Penelope is an automated tool that helps authors improve their work before submitting to a journal. Penelope scans manuscripts for common reporting errors and suggests improvements along with links to relevant resources. In doing so, she makes sure that all manuscripts meet journal standards before landing on an editor’s desk.

Richard Smith, founder of Nowomics

The new Nowomics website allows scientists to ‘follow’ biological terms to create a personalised news feed of new papers. With inline abstracts, search and altmetrics it aims to make content discovery simpler than sifting through email alerts and tables of contents.

Nowomics

Sabine Louët, founder of SciencePOD (raising the profile of research, via on-demand popular science articles)

SciencePOD delivers Science Prose On-Demand by translating complex scientific ideas into articles written in an accessible language. It then publishes this high-quality content in a slick magazine format and distributes it widely.

Science pod

Karl Ward, principal engineer at CrossRef (CrossRef’s REST API: All-you-can-eat Scholarly Metadata)

CrossRef’s REST API provides free and open search of metadata covering over 70 million journal articles, books and conference proceedings. Find out how anyone can build services using CrossRef’s metadata, including basic bibliographic information, funding, award and license data for published works and more.

Cross ref

Giorgos Georgopoulos – product, delivery, and business development at Futurescaper

Futurescaper is a tool that connects people’s thinking on complex issues, and is being used to help coordinate teams of researchers working on long-term, multi-author projects. We were given an example of how a team of analysts used Futurescaper to make sense of 300+ citations, collected over 3 months by 24 environmental researchers, in just a day.

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The Publishing for Digital Minds Conference

Just ahead of the London Book Fair comes The Publishing for Digital Minds Conference.  There are a few of these ‘digital’ conferences about publishing and to be fair the question was asked, ‘When will we stop doing a specific digital conference?’ – surely it’s already now an integral part of publishing.  Perhaps it will be renamed ‘The Innovation for Publishing Conference’ next year?

Hosts were John Mitchinson and Sam Missingham and they brought us an interesting mix of author and publisher updates.

Sarah Lloyd of Macmillan chaired the session on ‘New Trends: Marketing; Tech; Social’.  More and more segmentation of audiences means you can cleverly decode when and who to target.  You need to know your audience – which is changing. We need to change our marketing methods with them.  We don’t necessarily need a Snapchat strategy but need to be aware of it.

Very much in the news recently is the idea of subscriptions and there was an interesting (if slightly too European with a pinch of US) session ‘Busting the myths’.  Good to hear what’s happening with Mofibo in Denmark and Sweden but I’d like to know what UK publishers are thinking. I did like Justine Solomon of Bytethebook’s question that people can only deal with 7 subscriptions – so is this a viable option.

We had an unusually ‘Objective Case Study’ on Amazon from Charles Arthur, a journalist. He told us that habits are changing and we need to remember this to get an objective overview. Amazon is plateauing in terms of sales; the Kindle uptake has stalled; they’re ambitious in sales of hardware so people will buy the content but sales of the Fire phone bombed – they’re not very good at hardware. He questioned their cashflow and whether they can continue not making profit. He called Kindle self-publishing ‘the world’s biggest slush pile’ where publishers can pick up the occasional gem.

Well done LBF for a session not on Trade/Consumer publishing. ‘Edtech: Lessons to be Learnt’ was a great insight into what’s going in traditional and new, digital only content and there’s a healthy competition!

Edtech - lessons to be learnt

Steve Connolly of Hodder Education feels technology is a means to an end and we shouldn’t over complicate things. Teachers know how to assess a book quickly, if they can’t assess a digital product in a few minutes, it isn’t going to work. If you can do 20 things highlight the top 3. Understand that analytics are at the top of everything.

Michael McGarvey of Cambridge University Press advises publishers to be realistic about what you can do on your own – CUP has worked with an exam board and raspberry pi on a new MOOK. Publishers are uncomfortable with iteration but need to see you can’t now have perfect product to take to market – you need to take ideas out and see how they work, then improve.

Jim Riley from Tutor2U was a controversial voice with clout – they have engaged an audience of 30 million.  He advised it’s more important to have customers then users as they pay the bills.

It was good to hear from the Digital Innovation Awards Finalists as they did a set 7 minute spiel for the audience vote.

The highlight for me was the Digital Minds Question Time chaired by Richard Mollet, Publishers Association with Charlie Redmayne, HarperCollins; Mandy Hill, Cambridge University Press; Andrew Barker, Liverpool University; and Dan KieranUnbound.

Question time

Questions included:

  1. Which department has been the slowest to change?
  2. How far along are you in diversifying away from reproduced text?
  3. Can you get people in a company to think digitally?
  4. What has the greatest red herring been?
  5. Amazon having problems – is this good news or bad?
  6. How many more years will publishers need a conference on digital?

Next will be a blog on the London Book Fair from our perspective…

Networking

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Emma Barnes: embrace the code

Emma-Barnes

This is a guest from Emma Barnes.
Emma is m.d. of Snowbooks, the independent publishing house she co-founded in 2003, and c.e.o. of the FutureBook-award-winning Bibliocloud system for publishing. As both a publisher and a coder, Emma has a unique vantage point on the intersection between digital technologies and innovative content.

When I graduated with an archaeology degree in 1996, and got a job as a management trainee for a global retail group, I had no idea that 8 years later I’d co-found an independent publishing company. And when I co-founded that independent publishing company, I had no idea that,13 years further on, I’d find myself a professional Ruby on Rails developer.

Life is weird. And you can’t plan it out. All you can do is try to be happy, and learn as much as you can on the off-chance that it’ll come in handy. I’ve got lucky: not only do I run Snowbooks — a lovely little publisher of amazing books — but nowadays I’m the lead programmer of Bibliocloud, our title management software which we’re formally launching out of beta at the London Book Fair this year.

A decade of steadily automating away the administrative drudge of publishing has left me a proficient programmer: first in XML and XSLT and now in the tools of the web development trade: Ruby on Rails, jQuery, SQL, HTML5 and CSS3 and database management on PostgreSQL. Using these tools, with my team, I’ve built Bibliocloud to be an enterprise management application which takes care of almost every aspect of our business. Snowbooks has relied on Bibliocloud throughout the app’s development: at the end of 2012 we started to license its use to other publishers and organisations.

Starting to code was not a frightening step into the dark, because I took baby steps. In 2003, I opened up an ONIX file. ONIX is XML, written more or less with English words. Figuring I could use it to populate AI templates, I tinkered with manipulating the XML until that was second nature. Coding is very moreish — start down the road, take small, incremental steps. Let the years pass and before you know it, you’ve got your 10,000 hours under your belt.

You shouldn’t think that you could never learn to code. My mental arithmetic skills are worse than my 6 year old’s. I would have been laughed out of a computer science degree interview. But I love patterns, and stories, and brevity and elegance: all the things that publishers are good at. You don’t know whether you can do it unless you try.

I learned to program because I needed something like Bibliocloud to exist so I could run Snowbooks properly. No-one else was going to write it, so I tooled up and did it myself. I had to go from a standing start, skills-wise, so it did end up taking quite a few years to progressively learn the right skills. But now I’m at the other end of the journey, it’s interesting to be able to compare life without coding skills, and life with.

And life without coding skills is awful! It’s chock-a-block full of admin. No-one goes into publishing to spend their days filling in repetitive, endless spreadsheets, surely? But unless you can manipulate data throughout your working day with little programs, you’re tied to the manual way of doing things.
If you can’t code, you don’t know what you don’t know. You don’t know what’s possible. You can’t be a digital creator because you’ve got no tools at your disposal, and no understanding for collaborating with others on such projects.

Only a select few publishers employ programmers at the moment. This will change, and the change will be overnight — but it takes time to learn how to code, so start now, or the new jobs will go to outsiders. Nowadays there are some amazing, cheap ways to learn programming — because people who can code are passionate about sharing their skills with everyone else. Look at Codeschool. Come to our own course, Try Programming for Publishers. Read The Rails Tutorial by Michael Hartl — by the end of it, you’ll have written your very own version of Twitter. Imagine!

In seven years, the kids who are currently learning to code in school, as part of the national curriculum, will be graduating. People with all sorts of degrees will have coding literacy, a skill as basic to them as English and maths. You’ve got a seven-year head start on them. Start to learn code now and you won’t be skilled out of the market before you’re 40.

Emma is on Twitter as @bibliocloud

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Smart Data Live!

Last week’s Smart Data Live! Forum, organised for publisher members of the AOP and PPA, provided valuable insight and direction to media companies still working out how to extract optimum value from the increasing data flow into their businesses. In his opening comments, Jeremy Bedford, VP of EMEA at Sailthru, stated that big data, as a concept, is useless. The aim is to create Smart Data, he said – a means of taking data, doing something useful with it and using it to answer questions.

Following the opening comments, Breton Fischetti, Senior Manager of Business and Audience Development at Business Insider, explained how data helps publishers understand what readers want to read and allows them to capitalise on readers’ interests. “Great digital stories drive everything”, in his view, but “data makes it easier”.

Business Insider

The challenge was, he said, how to use data to create value, underlining that print is still a good medium, but digital and data are the drivers now. His clear message concerned the need to unlock the value of passionate and engaged communities with a focus on what’s going to drive revenue rather than what’s nice to know, and that audience data can be monetised now in a way that wasn’t possible previously.

Guillermo Christensen, VP of Product, Intent IQ, addressed the challenge to media owners of serving content and advertising to individual preferences. “People are different, concentrate on those who are similar”, was his advice to businesses trying to understand audiences better and make more money. It is possible now to “track people in a way that reveals preferences and allows visitors to segment themselves across interest”, he said.

Ian Eckert, Managing Director of Audience Development at Abacus Media gave further food for thought by discussing how data and breaking down audiences by segment enables the identification and development of markets and new products.

A concluding panel discussion considered the importance of editors. “Algorithms can’t write great content”, Fischetti told the audience, “There’ll always be a need for editors”. Data is the new tool that can now support editors and media companies and allow them to unlock value.

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Visiting the BETT show (the world’s leading learning technology event that brings together inspiration and innovation within the education industry)

Alison, Stefania and I braved the trip out to Excel last week for the infamous BETT show (stands for British Education and Training Technology in case you’re wondering!).  As you might imagine it’s a vast hall bursting at the seams with all things educational including publishers, technical suppliers and lots of teachers.

It was fascinating to see some of the new innovations in educational content – so much is now digital and video based, learning really should be fun!

We saw lots of our publisher clients there (there were 779 exhibitors so we can’t name them all but here’s a flavour):

Bloomsbury Publishing
Cambridge University Press
DK presenting their new product DKFindOut.com
Encyclopaedia Britannica (uk) Ltd
GL Assessment
HarperCollins / Collins
Macmillan
Pearson
Oxford University Press

There were some big name speakers including John Couch, Vice President of Education for Apple, who pointed out that educators are expected to perform miracles.  ‘Today’s classroom should be creative, relevant, collaborative and challenging’.

Nicky Morgan, Secretary of State for Education gave a keynote speech outlining that £1.7 billion will be invested in superfast broadband, but teachers need better training to match.

There’s tons of info on the BETT website including seminars, videos and you can download a copy of The UK Education Market Opportunity Report.

David Hoare, Chair of Ofsted questioned why 1 in 5 children leaves school without the numeracy or literacy they need to get a job.  There are lots of reasons but the charity we support, Beanstalk, is doing lots of good work to provide one-to-one reading support in primary schools to children who have fallen behind with their reading.

Do check it out and put in the diary for next year!

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The FutureBook Conference (part two)

The afternoon at the FutureBook conference was as busy and inspiring as the morning. After lunch, I decided to learn a bit more about “the long-term role of social media in publishing”. The amazing Rachel Fershleiser (Director of Publisher Outreach at Tumblr) told us everything we needed to know about Tumblr. Publishers often underestimate the potential of Tumblr where there is an incredible community of readers sharing their thoughts about their favourite books. Tumblr users react to art by creating their own content. Publishers have to be aware that their audience now have an audience too. And again, Rachel agreed with the idea that digital and social media gives you the opportunity to publish more specific content as you can get straight to your readers.

David Ripert (Head of YouTube spaces EMEA at Google/YouTube) gave another example of how book fans can turn into real promotion executives! Have you ever heard about BookTubers? (part of the audience had, I must say I hadn’t). It’s basically book fans like Sanne Vliengenthart who own their own YouTube channel and use it to talk about books. It is entertaining and educational and has become very popular in the last few years. BookTubers now have over 26 million views and 426k subscribers. Why so popular? Because it’s accessible and shareable.

Joe Cohen (CEO at Movellas) actually goes further with Movellas, a community site where you can publish your own stories – or movellas as they like to call them and your audience is actually a source of content. They think of themselves as the home of the fan girl!

I spent the rest of the afternoon finding out about what’s happening in the digital sphere today and hearing about predicted trends for tomorrow. FutureBook was provocative, informative and overall a great day.  I don’t think anybody that attended could deny the importance of digital and social media in the world today and its relevance to the publishing industry.

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