Tag Archives: Entry Level

SYP Practical Workshops: How to be a Booktuber

How to be a booktuber

SYP Practical Workshops: How to be a BookTuber

On Monday evening our Administrator and Social Media Coordinator Ellie was lucky enough to attend the first of the Society of Young Publishers (SYP) Practical workshops. The topic was:

How to be Booktuber.

The workshops are a new yearly series of workshops occurring once a month, about a different topic each month. For a full list of the upcoming workshops and how to apply to take part in one take a look at the SYP’s page here.

This workshop was run by an established Booktuber: Leena Normington, aka justkissmyfrog on YouTube.

Leena has previously worked as a Creative Producer for Pan Macmillan, running their BookBreak series on YouTube, and currently works for the Telegraph. She has been a Booktuber for 7 years and was happy to share some tips and practical advice about starting a BookTube channel.

Held at Hachette, the evening consisted of a lot of laughter, discussions and a task of pitching a YouTube video around a certain book.

The workshop was fully attended by 10 people so everyone got a chance to speak, ask questions and generally chat about the different ways YouTube can helping the publishing community within publicity, marketing, sales and more.

Here are our three top tips we took from the event:

  • Affiliate links on YouTube channels

Affiliate links are links to website and booksellers online where viewers of YouTube videos can purchase any of the products, in this case books, discussed within the video. Not only are these links great for promoting books but they’re also fantastic for monitoring how many and what type of books are being bought by the audience. Through this information a Booktuber can monitor the tastes of their audience and adapt to suit them, as well as prove that BookTube sells books!

  • YouTube & Google Analytics

Views are not everything…no, really! On YouTube when you post a video you can go to the Creator Studio and view your analytics for your channel and each individual video. Whilst getting 1000 views on a video would be fantastic, it’s better if the watch time of the video (the average length of time a person spent viewing the video) is higher or equal to the length of the video. If you have 1000 views, but the viewers only spent an average of 30 seconds watching a 4 minute video, this actually shows that this video wasn’t as successful as you thought. If a video has only 100 views but was watched for the entirety of its length this was a more successful video.

  • Tone & Topic

A strong point to take away from this workshop was the need for a consistent tone and topic across all social media channels within business. If a business has a Twitter, Instagram, newsletter etc, when building a new YouTube channel you need to build a channel that matches the established social media in tone and topic. It would be jarring to create fun, bright videos about different topics if the company’s other social media is very serious and focused solely on one topic.

BookTube is a growing social media platform, one which we ourselves have begun, and has been featured recently at several events. You can read about the BookTube event ran by BookMachine last month here.

This workshop was a lot of fun and left Ellie with a lot of information to take away; from software advice to campaign planning. It it was a fantastic evening with Leena and other SYP members and we can’t wait to hear about, and maybe attend, some of the next workshops!

For more information the workshops be sure to follow the SYP on twitter at @SYP_UK and also follow the official hashtag for the workshops: #SYPpubskills

Do you like the sound of BookTube or the SYP workshops? Let us know on any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Blogmas: Day 7

Today is the day of our Twitter Q&A! We will be hosting a Q&A for 1 hour from 12:30-1:30pm (GMT) we will be taking ALL of your questions about Publishing from questions on Work Experience, CVs, Applications and more! Just ask and we’ll answer! To ask us a question tag us @AtwoodTate and use the hashtag #AskAtwood!

We will also be continuing our Atwood Advent Calendar on Instagram and be releasing another new Blog post! So keep your eyes peeled for that!

You can also still enter our Giveaway over on our Blogmas blog! Make sure you’re following us on all our Social Media to stay up to date with what else we’ve got in store: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or Instagram.

Merry Christmas!

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Work experience in Publishing – Is this the best way to break into publishing?

work-experince-1

Common Symptom #1: Work Experience

  • Work experience. Are those two words causing you dread? It’s a natural reaction if they do.

For anyone renting privately in London, working for free simply isn’t viable. But don’t despair. There are publishers offering paid internships from £200-300 per week, depending on sector. It’s not for the faint of heart but it is worth it, if you really want it.

And therein lies part of the problem – a lot of people really want it. The market is saturated, which has in part devalued any and all graduates trying hard to break into the industry. You’re a fearsome young go-getter, dedicated, driven and you love books more than anyone else in the world – except the next person!

When you have no experience to refer to, you’re not exactly starting from a position of strength. So, work experience in publishing becomes the avenue through which you not only separate yourself from the pack but make the necessary contacts. While we all might like to think that our CV speaks for itself, the fact is that people remember a face, a conversation, an attitude, more than the most articulate and knowledgeable covering letter ever put to paper.

A publishing internship, or even a few weeks’ work experience in a publishing environment, puts you in the building. Here, at Atwood Tate, we call it FID – foot in door. And it’s a good place to start, particularly when it comes to temping.

On the temps and freelance desk, the turnaround is sometimes so quick an intern is exactly what we need, someone who has some experience but is not necessarily a seasoned pro, or doesn’t have a 4-week notice to give, and is looking to prove themselves. These are often jobs which are not long-term but might last the duration of, say, a project or acting as an additional resource during a busy period. Experienced candidates are not much interested in jumping ship for a few months but junior candidates can use this as a springboard to the rest of their publishing career.

A lot of publishing houses offer publishing internships and work experience. Many of them advertise them directly on their Careers page. Sites like Indeed and the Publishers Association also advertise them, as well as on company Twitter pages, the Society of Young Publishers and blogs such as Publishing Interns.

It’s important to do a little research and know what sector you’d like to work in. And when you’ve gotten your foot in the door, let us know – we just might be able to help you open it the rest of the way!

For more advice about entering publishing follow us on twitter at @AtwoodTate and Instagram for daily pieces of advice, or like us on Facebook and LinkedIn for all of our latest job postings, including Temporary and Freelance!

 

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