Tag Archives: Interview tips

How to Use Blogging to Get into Publishing

How to use Blogging to get into Publishing

How to Use Blogging to Get into Publishing

How relevant is blogging to publishing? You’d be surprised. Blogging is not a hobby you should start specifically to enter publishing, but if you have one: mention it!

Blogging is a growing hobby, and a new career choice, in the 21st century. Having a blog gives people a platform to discuss what they want and voice their own opinions. But it also gives you the opportunity to work with others across multiple fields of industry. Not to mention develops skills in your own time which can help you in the long-run.

If you’re just starting out and are looking for an entry-level role within publishing, blogging is a great skill to have! So long as you have some work experience to back it up, blogging can tip the balance on whether or not you get an interview or even a job!

There are many different types of blogs, and all can help you gain many skills, from Coding, Design, Marketing, networking and more! But within the Publishing industry specifically book blogging is a very relevant skill!

Book blogging, or booktubing (video blogging), gives you the chance to voice your opinions about books and the latest book trends. A book blogger can write reviews, top ten lists, trend-reviews and more and each of these topics has some relevance to publishing. If you’re an established book blogger you may even work with publishers; taking part in blog tours, hosting giveaways and Q&As and attending book events.

Through communicating with publishers through these events, and voicing your own opinions, shows a potential employee that you understand the industry. You can see trends, converse with professionals and work to deadlines in a creative and independent manner.

This is relevant to all sectors, be it Trade or B2B, and all roles from IT, Editorial, Publicity and more!

It also shows an interest outside of work, which suggests to a future employer that you are a reliable candidate with a keen sense of the publishing industry.

Whether you’re a book blogger or not; blogging is skill to add to your CV!

Here some things you can highlight to show how blogging is useful to you:

  • Commitment: The longer you’ve been blogging the better. This shows commitment and creative thinking, and also proves that you can work well independently.
  • Networking: If you’ve worked with brands or publishers mention it on your CV. Not only does it prove your communicational skills, but also shows an understanding of the industries you mention. This is particularly good if the brands are relevant to the job you’re applying for.
  • Social Media and SEO abilities: Have you got 1000 twitter followers because of your blog publicity? Mention it! Do you understand SEO? Mention it!
  • Coding: If you’ve altered your HTML yourself or have learnt about it then put that down as a skill. For more information about HTML and how to do it, look at our series of posts here!
  •  Design: Did you design your blog, or make your own graphics/headers? Have you got original artwork or worked with others to create artwork? Put it on your CV.

There are so many relevant and useful skills which can be a real pull to employers when looking at CV.

Make sure you have other work experience to back up your blog experiences, but also be sure to highlight the skills you have learnt through blogging! It could mean the difference between getting a job interview and getting a job when you’re first starting out!

Need any more tips about how to enter publishing? Take a look at our Work Experience & Entry-Level Resources!

For more advice, or if you have any questions, get in touch via any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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How to Register with Atwood Tate

how-to-register-with-atwood-tate

New Year, New Job?

Why not use Atwood Tate to help you find your next job in publishing. To take the first step you need to register with us!

This is entirely free and can be done online on our website!

Register Online

Click on the Login/Register button in the top right hand corner and then click on ‘Not Registered?’ This will take you to our registration page where you can fill out all of your personal details, your preferences and upload your CV.

You can choose up to three preferences, from a list, for three separate areas:

  • Job Type: i.e. Editorial, Sales or Marketing
  • Job Sector: i.e. STM, MedComms or B2B
  • Job Location: i.e. London, Oxford or International

You can also choose whether or not to receive Job Alerts. Job Alerts are tailored to your preferences, so if your top preferences are Editorial in a B2B sector if a job becomes available you will be alerted via email.

**Please note that when you sign up for Job Alerts you may receive several immediately. This will stop after a few hours, as these will be our current jobs that suit your preferences.

Also, our Job Alerts are not tailored to salary so some roles may be too senior or too junior for you depending on your experience. Please note that you are able to search for jobs by salary on our website Job search though. If you are confused or interested in any of these roles but are unsure of whether they are suitable, each email comes with the contact details for the consultant covering that position. Feel free to phone or email them for more details.

In addition, when you register with us you set yourself a password which will allow you to login to your profile page and make edits, such as upload a new CV, turn on/off your job alerts etc. Please make a note of your password upon registering. Your username will be your email address.

Once you have filled in your details and uploaded your most recent CV, press Register.

The Next Step

Your profile will have been added to our system and our Administrator Ellie Pilcher will review it within a couple of days. She will either send your details to the most relevant consultant:

For example:

Or, Ellie will respond herself to clarify any questions we may have, or to suggest that you gain more work experience. The majority of our clients require at least 3-6 months’ worth of in-house publishing experience before considering candidates for a role. Although our Temps desk may consider applicants with less experience who have admin skills, for temp roles.

Don’t be disheartened if we respond suggesting you need to gain more experience. We have resources we can point you to, to help you gain that experience! And we’re happy to answer any questions about Work Experience on our social media accounts. For more in-depth information please contact Ellie at: eleanorpilcher@atwoodtate.co.uk.

Office Registration

Once a profile has been reviewed by Ellie and forwarded to one of the consultants, that consultant will then get in touch with you! They may invite you to register with us in person, at either our London or Oxford office depending on your immediate location. We can also do registrations via the phone and Skype.

When you have registered online you are registered with Atwood Tate. You do not need to meet us in person before you can apply for our roles, you may do so immediately.

When a consultant organises to meet with you in person it is to gather more information about your past experiences, your skills and where exactly you would like to work within publishing. You and the consultant will sort out a time and date suitable for you both and directions/information will be given before your registration.

It is an informal registration, but you can use the experience as a practice interview if you like. You will be asked to complete a couple of forms, including our Equal Opportunities form, and you’ll be required to bring along two forms of identification: a passport &  your National Insurance number.

The meeting shouldn’t take more than 20-30 minutes, but it is your opportunity to ask us any questions you have, to highlight where you want to go within your career and to discuss any vacancies that we currently have.

Applying for a Job

Whilst registering with Atwood Tate you can apply for any of our current vacancies. However, if you require more information we can only forward further details, such as salary, location and the company name after you have registered with us, due to client confidentiality.

When you apply your information will be forwarded directly to the consultant handling the position. We recommend that you do not apply for more than three roles at a time, unless you are certain you have the required experience.

If you would like to contact us for more information regarding a job please have the reference number and Job Title to hand. They will be on the job alert or our website.

We will let you know within a few days whether or not you are suitable for the role. Although, if you have not heard from us after two weeks it is unlikely we can consider you for that position.

And there we have it! That is how you register with Atwood Tate!

If you have any further questions about registering with us please contact our administrator via telephone or email. And if you’ve registered with us before but have forgotten your details, or are struggling to access your profile, also contact our administrator.

If you have any immediate questions feel free to contact us via social media or comment down below. Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

We hope that you will register with us soon!

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Work experience in Publishing – Is this the best way to break into publishing?

work-experince-1

Common Symptom #1: Work Experience

  • Work experience. Are those two words causing you dread? It’s a natural reaction if they do.

For anyone renting privately in London, working for free simply isn’t viable. But don’t despair. There are publishers offering paid internships from £200-300 per week, depending on sector. It’s not for the faint of heart but it is worth it, if you really want it.

And therein lies part of the problem – a lot of people really want it. The market is saturated, which has in part devalued any and all graduates trying hard to break into the industry. You’re a fearsome young go-getter, dedicated, driven and you love books more than anyone else in the world – except the next person!

When you have no experience to refer to, you’re not exactly starting from a position of strength. So, work experience in publishing becomes the avenue through which you not only separate yourself from the pack but make the necessary contacts. While we all might like to think that our CV speaks for itself, the fact is that people remember a face, a conversation, an attitude, more than the most articulate and knowledgeable covering letter ever put to paper.

A publishing internship, or even a few weeks’ work experience in a publishing environment, puts you in the building. Here, at Atwood Tate, we call it FID – foot in door. And it’s a good place to start, particularly when it comes to temping.

On the temps and freelance desk, the turnaround is sometimes so quick an intern is exactly what we need, someone who has some experience but is not necessarily a seasoned pro, or doesn’t have a 4-week notice to give, and is looking to prove themselves. These are often jobs which are not long-term but might last the duration of, say, a project or acting as an additional resource during a busy period. Experienced candidates are not much interested in jumping ship for a few months but junior candidates can use this as a springboard to the rest of their publishing career.

A lot of publishing houses offer publishing internships and work experience. Many of them advertise them directly on their Careers page. Sites like Indeed and the Publishers Association also advertise them, as well as on company Twitter pages, the Society of Young Publishers and blogs such as Publishing Interns.

It’s important to do a little research and know what sector you’d like to work in. And when you’ve gotten your foot in the door, let us know – we just might be able to help you open it the rest of the way!

For more advice about entering publishing follow us on twitter at @AtwoodTate and Instagram for daily pieces of advice, or like us on Facebook and LinkedIn for all of our latest job postings, including Temporary and Freelance!

 

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Dress Codes for Interviews

dress-code-for-interviews-12

It is universally acknowledged that within the first 30 seconds of meeting a potential new employee the interviewer will judge them. First impressions, unfortunately, mostly come down to what we look like.

That is why dressing appropriately for an interview is so important.

Don’t be fooled into thinking that this means you should go out and buy a suit as a simple go-to interview outfit. Publishing is a creative industry; whilst looking smart is paramount at an interview, dressing like you is also key.

As a general tip, don’t dress up for an interview. Dress like you would if you got the job and were going into work at the office every day. Smart, but not overly so.

  • Stick to the guidelines given. If they say “smart casual” do not go above ‘smart’ by wearing a two-piece power suit, but definitely don’t go below the guidelines by wearing denim jeans and trainers.
  • If you’re unsure as to what to wear just ask us when you come to a pre-interview meeting. You can even use the meeting as a practice-dress, if you like.

For example, a generic high street suit will not express your personality or originality and in a creative industry, could be judged as unimaginative or overly conservative.  Just small tweaks like adding accessories or having a well-fitting but less conventional jacket can make all the difference in helping you to stand out and express yourself and your character.  You also need to feel comfortable and confident and none of us feel at our best when wearing an ill-fitting outfit that we would never otherwise consider putting on for the office or a meeting.

  • For an interview most women could wear a dress/blouse with a jacket that looks good, but isn’t necessarily a matching suit.  You can accessorise with a scarf or jewellery or statement shoes.
  • Men don’t need to be left out and can still look sharply dressed and add touches of coordinating colour through a tie, cuff links, glasses, watch etc. Pick a shirt that fits you well, is comfortable and is ironed.  You don’t want to appear to be wearing a baggy school uniform shirt or a collar that’s so tight you can barely breathe.

It’s important to be memorable but you probably don’t want to be remembered for a terrible comedy tie or a too loud shirt.  Try your outfit on well in advance if possible and get your housemates or partner to give you honest feedback if you’re feeling worried.

Dressing for an interview is always a tricky balance, but I think it’s important to feel comfortable and confident, whilst looking your best and feeling your best. Erring on the side of smart usually is safer, but there are always ways of being smart without being an uncomfortable dark suited clone.

If you would like to receive more tips about Interviews and CV’s make sure you follow us on Twitter @AtwoodTate and on Facebook, or follow us on LinkedIn!

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How to write a great CV

How to write a great CV

As administrator for Atwood Tate I am the one responsible for going through 70-90 CV’s a week and determining which Consultant to send a CV to. I am also the one who determines whether or not we can help a candidate, at first glance.

Since Atwood Tate is a specialist Publishing Recruitment Company it is imperative that there a candidate has some sort of publishing experience, or a relevant skill to be used within publishing, in order for us to consider them as an applicant.

So for my first bit of advice:

  • Add all publishing experience: be it a one week work placement or a freelance marketing job! Write it down

Blogging, writing your own stories and working as a reviewer for an online magazine are not quite what we mean. But if you’ve worked with editors or a marketing department to promote your blog or reviews then add it! It makes you just that little more qualified.

That piece of advice is tailored to our company being a Publishing Recruitment specialist; the advice below is much more universal.

  • Stick to two or three pages MAX: Be as concise as possible. We do not need a page of publications or a list of quotes from your references. We need your work experience (including dates!), education, personal details and skills.
  • Use Bullet Points: From experience trying to piece together a person’s ability from a long spiel in a paragraph is a lot harder than reading their skills listed in bullet points.
  • Employment History: This should always be written in reverse chronological order, with your most recent or current job at the top. It makes it easier for us to see what kinds of roles you are looking to move into and your current skill-set. Add bullet points underneath of your most relevant tasks – if you have done similar roles in the past pick the most interesting/important achievements in each role rather than list the same skills repetitiously.
  • Education: This should also be written in reverse chronological order. We rarely need to know you’re modules or tutors, we simply need your degrees/qualifications and grades.
  • Further Skills: A useful addition to any CV is a bullet point list or paragraph of additional skills, which may not have been listed in your employment history. For example: IT skills (whether you’re Mac or PC literate) MS Office, a language etc
  • Write in the Third person: Ellie finds that CVs in the third person are much more professional
  • Typos: This is a cardinal sin on all CVs, but particularly on CVs that are about to enter the publishing world. Publishing is all about the written word, whether you’re applying for IT roles or Marketing. You cannot have typos in your CV.
  • Update it regularly! A CV should be updated every time it is sent out, even if you have been in the same job for ten years. Update your skills, personal details, preferences etc. Edit it for the role(s) you’re applying for.

To register with Atwood Tate please click here. For more advice regarding CV’s please see our CV layout recommendations.

If you have any questions about whether or not to send us your CV or how best to layout a CV, get in contact with us on any of our social media sites: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or LinkedIn!

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Ten Things you should never say in an Interview

Ten Things

Interviews can be scary and sometimes we say things which we really shouldn’t! Here are ten things you should never say in an interview.

  1.  ‘I don’t know – If you don’t know the answer to a question ask them to re-phrase it. ‘I don’t understand’ is ten times better than ‘I don’t know’. If the question they ask is something like ‘Where do you see yourself in five years’ time’ definitely don’t say ‘I don’t know!’ Talk about your career plan, your ideal future, anything but ‘I don’t know.’
  2. I hate my old boss! – Imagine how this looks to a prospective new boss. Answer: not good. It’s not the right attitude and it isn’t the right etiquette for an interview. No matter the circumstances with regards to the parting of the ways, you should never bad-mouth professionals to other professionals, particularly in interviews!
  3. ‘What is your sick leave and absence policy? – This is a worrying thing for an interviewer to hear. If you’re asking about time off before you’ve got the job then why employ you in the first place? If you have a long-term illness or an unwell family member/friend under your care, then by all means let the employee know, if they need too, but never ask about sick/absence policy during an interview.
  4. What does your company do?’ – Not only does this show poor preparation it also shows lack of interest. If an interviewer has one job and five applicants, and you ask this question then they are not going to employ you. Even if you have the best CV. Understanding your prospective role in a company and having knowledge of the company itself is crucial to surviving in a job, not to mention an interview. You should always prepare for an interview by looking at the company’s website and the job description given!
    Interviews
  5. I just want a job!’ – Many of us have been in that situation when all you want is a job or a change of scene, but saying this in an interview is unsuitable and off-putting. It will make the interviewer doubt whether you are there because you are genuinely interested in the position, or if you are simply trying to earn a wage.
  6. *BEEP* – Don’t swear! It will make you come across as aggressive, rude and inappropriate. You’ll put off your interviewer and may well end the interview early, depending on the severity of the language and the context it is in.
  7. Where did you get your shoes?!’ – There is a time and place for questions and compliments like this – the interview room is not one of them! It is distracting and inappropriate, and if shoes (or other physical attributes) are the first thing on your mind when you enter an interview then you won’t come across as professional or good candidate material.
  8. No, I don’t have any questions – This shows a lack of interest! If the interviewer has been incredibly thorough throughout the interview, or your mind goes blank from an information overload, ask them to repeat something – the wage range, what training is offered, who you will report to etc. It shows regard whereas simply asking nothing will bring the interview to an abrupt end, and it can quickly become awkward with you coming across as disinterested. Not the lasting impression you want.
  9. I’m Motivated, Reliable, Organised, Creative & Intuitive’ – Never say just these 5 things when asked ‘Describe yourself in 5 (+/-) words’, they are over-used and almost always a cover for not knowing how to answer. Instead of these use less-used or more exciting adjectives like: ambitious, punctual, honest, confident, diligent…among others. Stand out from the crowd and mean what you say!
  10. So when do I start?’ – Be confident Yes! Arrogant no!

For more tips about jobs and interviews make sure you follow Atwood Tate on all our social media: @AtwoodTate, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn! 

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Interview Tip of the Day

One question that can really trip you up in an interview is when you are asked a question about a time you failed. I mean, no one wants to talk about when they failed, right?

puppy stairs

Just remember, the interviewer isn’t trying to trick you. Everyone has failed sometime in a role. The point of this question is not to catch people out, but to understand how they have learned from negative experiences.

So, pick an example of when you were less than perfect (but not an idiot), explain what went wrong, then explain what you learnt and what you did to make sure it never happened again.

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Competency Based Interviews: Top Tips

A lot of companies are now using competency based interviews so you need to be prepared. Competency questions are about your behaviour and are a way for the interviewer to predict how you will act in a situation in a more objective way.
The interviewer will ask you a series of questions along the lines of:

  • Describe a situation when you…
  • Give an example of a time when you…

They vary from a standard interview which may be more of a conversation or information gathering. Competency based interviews are more systematic with questions targeting a specific skill or competency. You will be asked questions about your behaviour in specific circumstances, and you’ll need to give situational examples.

Ideally you will have been provided with a Job Description and Person Specification to help you prepare for the interview. Use this to focus on the skills and competencies they’re looking for. Look back at your employment and personal history to find a couple of examples for each that show you’ve got the relevant skills and strengths in each area to achieve a positive result.

For example, if you think you’ll be asked questions about your communication skills, find an example of when you resolved a disagreement, gave a presentation or taught someone how to do something.

Use the STAR technique (situation, time, action and result). Put together a sentence to describe each of these elements and remember the result or outcome is the most important bit to show you learned from the experience.

  • Think of a Situation where you applied the competency
  • What was the Task required as a result
  • Explain the Action(s) you took to fulfil the task
  • Highlight the Result of that action

Some key competencies include:

  • Communication skills
  • Decision making
  • Teamwork
  • Leadership
  • Problem-solving
  • Responsibility
  • Organisation

Some typical questions and what they’re assessing:

  • Tell me about a time when your work or an idea was challenged and you had to deal with conflict.
    Individual qualities – adaptability, compliance, decisiveness, flexibility, resilience, tenacity, conflict management, empathy, teamwork, independence, risk taking, integrity
  • Describe a situation where you had to lead a team through change.
    Managerial skills – leadership, empowerment, delegation, influencing, strategic thinking, organisational awareness, project management and managerial control
  • Tell me about a time when you came up with a new solution to a problem.
    Analytical – decision making abilities; innovation and creativity, problem solving, practical learning and attention to detail
  • Describe a situation where your communication skills made a difference to the outcome of a situation.
    Interpersonal – Social competence and communication (verbal, listening and written).
  • When did you feel the greatest sense of achievement at work?
    Motivational – resilience, motivation, result orientation, initiative and quality focus.

Some more examples can be found here:

http://www.theguardian.com/careers/careers-blog/star-technique-competency-based-interview

http://www.kent.ac.uk/careers/compet/skillquest.htm

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The Five Realities of Recruitment in Publishing

Back in January, I had a lovely chat with then-SYP Oxford Co-Chair Emma Williams about publishing employment myths, legends and unconventional career paths. The interview was originally posted on the SYP blog.

I am reposting it here (with a few small updates).

The Five Realities of Recruitment in Publishing

Reality One: You don’t have to do a Publishing/English/Humanities degree to go into Publishing.

Although there are a variety of fantastic qualifications out there which will certainly provide a good start to a career in publishing, having a degree, MA or other academic qualification is by no means the only way in. Real world experience is very valuable, and whether you are a Scientist, Financial Analyst, or a Language specialist, there are many opportunities for people with different skillsets to find satisfying work in Publishing. Claire Louise herself has worked in various roles previous to working at Atwood Tate, and we discussed the impact of how early employment in social work, rights administration and qualifications in computing have given her skills that she can now use daily to match up employers and employees successfully. Claire Louise says:

“Along with experience, employers look for people with passion and a willingness to go above and beyond. Look closely at everything you had done up till now, and make your transferable skills obvious in your application.”

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Reality Two: An interest in literature is helpful, but you’ll need to look beyond a book to get ahead.

The importance of HTML, XML and other ‘techie’ skills shouldn’t be underrated by applicants in the current publishing environment. The explosion of blogging, social media, digital and other computer based skillsets are useful and relevant skills to develop, regardless of your job role (editorial, production, publicity and many other areas within a business may use the same skills for a variety of purposes), and will help to boost your own visibility and, of course, that of your future employer. For instructions on HTML, there’s a series of helpful articles here on the blog.

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Reality Three: A role in Editorial is not your only option. There’s so much more to apply for!

The move to digital, e-books, e-readers, new platforms and social media have all encouraged new types of publishing companies to launch and develop, and within them, work in areas that are perhaps less obvious or familiar. Those interested in moving into the Industry might want to consider Licensing, IT, Digital Content, Database management, Publicity, Social Media/Communications or a number of other options, as well as the more typical publishing job roles. For more information check out the PressForward live blog of the SYP conference 2013 at or on Twitter at #SYPC13. A glossary to the world of publishing can be found on the Atwood Tate website.

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Reality Four: When applying for a Job, the most important thing you will do is write a specific, appropriate and interesting covering letter.

So, when you need a job, it seems logical to approach the matter by statistics- the more you apply for, the greater your chance of getting one, right? However, if you rush through the application, without taking care to review the job specifications, weigh your own interests and skills, and evaluate the chance of a good match, it could all end in … well … rejection. The cover letter is your one and only chance to put this in written form, and stand out from a crowd of applicants. When done correctly, it should clearly show that you have both the skills and interest to do the job in question to a high standard.

Therefore spending time working through the points that the company are looking for and matching them to your own experience and skills will allow you to present a strong, clear and persuasive cover letter. This should be a real priority, and should be done carefully for every single application you send out! Have a look at our guide to the perfect cover letter.

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Reality Five: Make friends, don’t alienate people!

Publishing is a very social industry, and so networking and people skills are important. Self-development, career development and an awareness of the larger industry trends as a whole can be worked on through talking to contacts, friends and colleagues that you make along your journey through the industry. Attending events, working on blogs, using twitter, joining groups and getting involved with things in your local publishing community are all free/low cost ways to get experience and make friends. It’s a lot of fun, and you never know when additional learning gained in this way might be helpful in a current or future role.

For example, Claire Louise has recently co-founded a book group which has coincidentally brought together people working in all areas, companies, non-profits and other areas of publishing through their love of books, and there are many other groups, courses and events held in the UK including SYP, OPuS, BookMachine and many more.

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Have some thoughts of your own to share? Why not comment below, or get involved on Twitter (@AtwoodTate), or find us on FaceBook.

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Inside Atwood Tate

Recruitment is a busy business. Recruitment into the publishing industry is quite immeasurable at the moment due to the ever changing nature of it. Finding the right candidate for the right job is at the very core of what we do and, realising that some publishers aren’t even sure of what they need themselves, therein we find the challenge.

It’s a tricky business at times. So what happens when you apply for a job through us? What’s the process? How can we help you find your next role?

It’s very simple.

Firstly, at the very beginning of the process, we have to understand what our client is looking for. We have to understand not only the skill set required for each job but also the characteristics of the potential perfect person for the role. We work very closely with each client. Not only does this mean we know exactly what they’re looking for it means we have a better idea of whether the job is going to suit you.

Essentially we are the gatekeepers for the role.  Essentially we have an idea of the skill sets and the candidate experience required by our client. This means that, even though you may think that you are right for the role, you may not be the right “fit” for the company. We know exactly what our clients are looking for. Sometimes this isn’t going to be you and we like to think this works both ways. We can’t put your application forward for a role that we both know isn’t going to be successful. There’s no point in finding you a job that isn’t the right fit for you.

So you have followed the guidelines for preparing your cover letter and application? Your CV is up to date and error free? Great. Once your CV and cover letter are sent off to the right consultant your work is done. You wait for a response.

Please bear in mind that we deal with a large volume of candidates and a huge amount of client correspondence. If we don’t get back to you straight away please don’t take it personally. Like any job we have to prioritise what is most important at that moment, on that day and in that week. (We DO read every email and respond as soon as possible, however).

However if we feel that the job is perfect for you we will endeavour to contact you straightaway as, in essence, you become a priority. Our job in the main is to spot the right candidate amongst the variety of others that apply. We’ve got a good sense of what makes a good candidate. It’s part of our job to recognise talent.

Then we meet you face to face. We meet in our offices and discuss your CV to some depth, discuss your experiences and find out what exactly you’re looking to explore in your career path. Meeting people is the one true way to establish whether someone is a good candidate. Not only does it allow us to establish what you’re capable of, it gives us an idea of “you” based on your body language, approach, use of language and basic interview performance skills.

If you’re invited to interview we’re with you the whole way. We can discuss interview techniques, the company profile, HR requests or any part of the process which you feel you need help with. If the client likes the look of you and, more importantly, whether you think the role and the environment is the right fit for you we then handle the acceptance procedure.

Lastly we bid a farewell to our newly successful candidate in the hope that our services are being highly spoken of to their new colleagues. We like to think that all candidates will eventually become clients one day. We are in it for the long game. A good way to measure how good a candidate is how long they stay on our books. Excellent candidates don’t stay with us for very long. Sad face.

The hardest part of this job is telling people “no”.

“I’m really sorry you haven’t been invited back for second interview”.

“There were just some stronger applicants more suitable for the role”.

“I’m sorry to tell you that they won’t be taking your application any further”

A lot of our time is spent informing people that they are not suitable for the job. A lot of time is spent circumnavigating the often incredible amount of correspondence from those looking for work. Unfortunately not everyone is going to be perfect for every job. Not everyone is going to be lucky enough to be applying for the right job at the right time.

At times, due to the sheer volume of applicants, we have to send out automated replies to those unsuccessful. This is a time saver for us so, again, please don’t take it personally. We can assist you much more effectively if you take some time to think about whether you are suitable for the job you’re applying for. We can guide you more appropriately if you are realistic with your expectations. We can be honest with you if you are honest with your expectations.

This marvellous post should set you on the right track for establishing exactly what role you should be applying for and how to go about it.

If there are any roles you think you’d like to apply for get in touch. If you want to find out more about what Atwood Tate do then get in touch. We’re all friendly, approachable people who are very good at what we do. We look forward to hearing from you.

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