Tag Archives: Interview

Consultant in the Hot Seat: Faye Jones

 

 

Which three books changed your life?

  1. 1984 by George Orwell – I read this book for my English Literature A Level and then went to see a theatre production of it and it blew my mind. Everyone in my family has read it and we will often say that situations in the news can be “very 1984”. This is the first book that changed the way I looked at surveillance and made me think about how we’re always being watched by someone!
  2. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald – I read the Great Gatsby on holiday and managed to finish it in a couple of hours because I was hooked. I then went on to study it at Alevel before I read 1984 and it made me want to study English after I left school. I really enjoyed the Baz Luhrmann film adaptation as it’s quite true to the book but I would definitely choose the book over the film if I had to make a choice between the two.
  3. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night time by Mark Haddon – I didn’t think that I would enjoy this book when I first heard about it but it was another holiday read that I couldn’t put down. I love the way that the main characters thoughts are narrated and the story is fantastic. I really want to go and see the theatre adaptation of the book so hopefully I can book tickets to see it soon!

Who would you invite to your fantasy literary dinner?

  1. Roald Dahl – would love to pick his brain about what his books are inspired by and how his upbringing in Cardiff effected his writing.
  2. W H Auden – I absolutely love Auden’s poetry especially Miss Gee, I would just sit and listen to him read his poetry all day if I could.
  3. Jacqueline Wilson – I grew up reading all of Jacqueline Wilson’s books and would love to meet her in person.

What has been the highlight/s of the past year?

I graduated from university in July 2017 and while I was studying I went to weekly Lindyhop classes and became quite involved in the Swing Dance Society. It was sad leaving Reading after I graduated but luckily for me I got to move back 9 months later and started going back to Lindyhop classes straight away. I loved seeing my dance friends again and seeing how the beginners have improved while I was away.

If you could write ‘THE book’ on something, the definitive how-to guide on any subject, which topic would you choose.

If I had to write a book on anything it would be how to handle yourself in social dancing situations within partnered dances (if you can’t tell I really like social dancing). I think many beginners are worried about doing something wrong or stepping on another person’s feet but it is all about confidence! I would love to write a book that guided you through how to build up your confidence and eventually, ask a stranger to dance with you at an event.

True fact: My mother made me go to Ballet classes when I was 4 because I use to walk around on what I called my ‘tippy toes’ all day and everyone was worried that I would really hurt my feet.

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Administrator in the Hot Seat: Anna Slevin

If you could write ‘THE book’ on something, the definitive how-to guide on any subject, which topic would you choose?

This is also my one true fact to share but I wrote 6,000 words about cinnamon instead of a dissertation for my degree! It wasn’t definitive so I’d quite like to go back and do that someday. (It was a choice between cinnamon or coffee at the time but I didn’t want to end up hating coffee!)

What three books changed your life?

First Test by Tamora Pierce

Where a girl didn’t have to pretend to be a boy to do what she wanted! (Tamora Pierce started in the eighties and is having a revival at the moment) It didn’t so much change my life as shape it from the start because my mum read it to me when I was about six I think.

The Corfu Trilogy by Gerald Durrell

(Slightly cheating I know but I only picked it up because it was so thick!) This autobiography melded fact and storytelling the point where I went off and wrote about cinnamon and studied Creative Nonfiction later. It’s been adapted into several television productions each different from the last. It showed me that real life can be as interesting as fiction and imagination can be applied to everything. Even slugs.

Kitchen by Banana Yoshimoto

I often give people the impression that I only read longer books or sprawling series, this isn’t entirely true because of this book. The amount of foreign literature in translation on British shelves is minimal – this is criminal. Kitchen is two novellas by a Japanese author that were somehow mainstream enough to be in English at my local library. Novellas are often underrated or undervalued, unfortunately they cost almost the same as much lengthier paperbacks. But some stories should be a certain length. Some stories need a certain style, a certain pace. Some stories are specific and individual and particular. But resonate. I now actively look for shorter fiction and translations.

If you were given the chance to have one superpower from any book/comic character, what would you have?

 Walking between worlds. It’s something of a theme in Diana Wynne Jones from her nine-lived enchanters with the title Chrestomanci to Howl of the Moving Castle fame (the film is very different! In the book he’s actually Howell Jenkins from Wales in our world) and in Homeward Bounders while in The Merlin Conspiracy there is confusion with multiple Earths…

The way it can mean so many different things even to one author strikes me as something special. It normally makes the character appreciate the world they come from or find one they prefer! I like the idea of seeing how different societies function and being able to choose for myself, much like a good book…

Bonus Question

Who would you invite (and why) to your fantasy literary dinner party?

There’s a saying: “never meet your heroes” and a lot of the best characters can be very obnoxious… I’m actually reading The Immortal Dinner at the moment with Keats and Wordsworth in appearance but Wordsworth sounds like a very difficult guest at times!

Do you invite characters or authors? What would they eat? Does Bob Dylan count, having won the Nobel Prize? If this is a fantasy literary dinner party I would invite my dad and Bob Dylan to talk to each other because my dad would love that, and William Morris; I would invite my mum and Margaret Drabble because she introduced me to her, and Eric Hobsbawm; and I would quietly slip out the back door and ask my parents about it later as an after-party. I don’t know who would be making the food. My parents introduced me to literature for which I can never thank them enough so I think I’d rather they get the opportunity and I know I would have no regrets, facilitation being the better part of valour.

 

 

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Oxford Publishing Society: 21st Century Publishing Careers

On Thursday we attended the OPuS Event Careers in 21st century publishing at Oxford Brookes University. The event featured three speakers from a wide range of companies who talked through their own specific work experience path. The event aimed to answer questions on the ease of progressing and moving around in publishing, what key elements are needed to build your career and the possibility of finding success outside traditional publishing companies.

Faye & Alison and Oxford Publishing Society

 

Ian Campsall, Product Manager for The Science Direct Article Page at Elsevier

Ian completed the Oxford Brookes MA as he wanted to change careers. He completed an internship at John Wiley and then applied for the position of Digital Publishing Executive at Wiley, he then moved into product management for mobile platforms. He is now Product Management for Elsevier working on The Science Direct Article page.

Aaron O’Dowling-Keane, Sales and Marketing Manager at Sherlock: The Game is Now

Aaron also studied the MA in Publishing at Oxford Brookes and completed internships at OUP and the International Labour Office in Geneva. Her first role in publishing was for a small African Publisher in Oxford, she then moved away from publishing into crowdfunding, then story led interactive games and is now a Sales and Marketing Manager for a Sherlock themed escape room.

Saskia Watts, Marketing Specialist, VitalSource (Ingram)

After completing her MA in Publishing at Oxford Brookes, Saskia worked for Lightening Source as a marketing coordinator and she is now a marketing specialist for Ingram Vital Source.

Here are some interesting tips from the evening:
• Take risks
• Technology is everything and digital skills are important
• Organisation is key
• Talk to your company about career development opportunities
• Soft skills are vital
• Feedback is a good thing, use constructive feedback to improve
• Recognise that publishing is all about collaboration
• Take Risks, if the role does not suit you and you are not happy move on
• Be curious and talk to everyone, get to know people from different places
• Try everything and do everything, volunteer at university events, join societies like OPuS, SYP
• Create the role that you want
• Adapt and be flexible and keep learning

Useful links:
Oxford Publishing Society, OPuS: http://oxfordpublishingsociety.org/
SYP (Society of Young Publishers): https://thesyp.org.uk/

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SYP Panel Help Aspiring Publishers to Kick-Start Their Career

In September, SYP London kindly hosted ‘Kick-Start Your Career: How to Succeed with your Job Search this Autumn’ for aspiring and entry level publishing candidates hoping to gain some career and work experience from established members of the industry. Speakers included our very own Associate Director Helen Speedy, who all brought their experiences and insights on how to build a successful career in publishing.

Did you miss the event? Perhaps you would like a recap! Helen Speedy shares her publishing career advice and experiences.

Explain your role and how you got there (approx. 5 mins each).

I am the Associate Director at Atwood Tate, a specialist publishing recruitment company based in Central London and Oxford. My job is to manage the Permanent team day-to day, who consist of seven consultants and an administrator, and make sure everybody is hitting their targets, having smooth relations with both clients and candidates and generally feeling happy. I am also the contact for senior publishing roles across the country, so a day can be talking through pipelines and business development with my team, or taking briefs from clients and sourcing appropriate candidates for the recruitment process.

I got my first job through talking to one of the speakers at the Oxford Brookes Careers Day towards the end of my MA, who gave me the contact details of someone looking for an Office Junior.

How do I get my first job in publishing?

There are a number of ways to get your first publishing job, and it’s worth trying a few to give yourself the best possible chance.

  • MA (plus work experience and networking)
  • Work experience placements that could lead to your first job
  • Through an agency – temping can lead to perm or to getting that work experience you needed but being paid properly along the way (also perm)
  • Networking events are a great way to build up your contacts and make a good impression before you’ve even made an application!
  • Proactive volunteering/personal work are also worth considering to boost your CV and stand out from the crowd. It is a lot easier to prove your interest in children’s illustrated fiction if your social media, blogging or volunteering backs you up!

What advice would you give your younger self, when you were just starting out?

Be more confident and don’t always assume that there are people better qualified than you.

What do you regret doing in your career?

I don’t have any regrets really. That may sound a bit complacent, but I have the philosophy that you make the right decision at the time and there is no point looking back. There are various points in my career when I could have taken a different path and I have turned down jobs and also taken roles that didn’t quite turn out to be what I thought. I remind myself that I made those decisions and they felt like the right choice at the time.  As long as you feel in control  and you are happy with your decision at that time, you should not have any regrets.  The only lasting regret I have is not calling out a bully, but I was young and in the junior position, so I forgive myself and it has given me the strength to help others confront difficult situations and not be scared to do so myself.

Associate Director Helen Speedy (second from left) after speaking on the panel

What’s the best career advice you’ve heard?

  • In terms of CV advice, make sure it shows the difference you made and the impact you’ve had, not just a list of your duties
  • If you’ve got lots of voluntary experience, internships and temp roles, try categorising rather than listing chronologically – tell a story and make sure the facts support the narrative.

How do you know if you should go for a role or not?

  • Can you tick 70-80% of the boxes (usually nobody has it all!)
  • Is it located in a sensible place for you to commute to?
  • Does picturing yourself in the role make you feel excited?
  • Do you think it would give you opportunities to learn?
  • What do you know about the company culture and how that would suit you?
  • If you’re not sure, try to have a conversation (with recruiter or name on advert)

Is it off-putting for employers if you apply for lots of different positions at the same company?

It depends on the size of company. It can be off-putting if it looks you are applying for anything and there is no real effort on any of the applications.  HR will begin to wonder how can  you be truly that interested in so many different roles with different skillsets! If there are different roles that catch your eye, find out if they will refer you if their role isn’t suitable. In a small company,you may get referred internally (I did for my first job and ended up with a better job than the one I applied for!)

Want to hear more about the SYP?

The Society of Young Publishers is a membership body for aspiring publishers and current candidates in the first ten years of their career. With branches in London, Oxford, South-West, North, Ireland and Scotland; the SYP is the biggest membership organisation in the publishing industry. For more details and to sign up, go to https://thesyp.org.uk/membership-signup.

 

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B2B Job Focus: Sub-Editors

In a previous post, we described different career paths available to B2B reporters. In this article, we explore the significant part played by sub-editors/copy-editors in the editing process!

Sub-editors / Copy-editors

Sub-editors who work for newspapers and magazines are often called copy-editors (or subs). Their role is to process the copy that will appear in their publication. They must ensure that it is accurate, free of mistakes, makes sense and reads well.

Sub-editors often sit in/next to the production team. They do not write articles, but they edit the work of others to “house-style” and adhere to word counts. They also write headlines, standfirsts, captions and summaries. Their duties may include laying out pages too.

Typical tasks

  • correcting spelling or grammar/typographical errors
  • writing headlines, abstracts and captions
  • checking the article’s accuracy and spotting potential legal problems
  • cutting or editing copy to fit on the page
  • liaising with reporters and editors
  • laying out pages

Sub-editors need to be meticulous and ready to edit heavily if necessary. They are more often than not the crafty hands turning articles into compelling stories. They need to be very organised and able to work to tight deadlines.

Many sub-editors trained as journalists before moving on to this position. Unfortunately a lot of publishers outsourced their sub-editing/production function in the last decade and journalists and editors often have to fill in for sub-editors as they don’t have the in-house staff required. And the line is sometimes very thin between these positions.

Career Path

The National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ), the National Union of Journalists (NUJ), the Society of Editors and the Publishing Training Centre offer preliminary accredited qualifications or copy-editing courses by distance learning. Graduates with relevant qualifications, such as a degree in English, media or publishing are also considered. The career path for a sub-editor includes being promoted to senior and potentially chief sub-editor or production editor. Their main role is to supervise a team of sub-editors and oversee the whole production process, making sure the magazine is delivered on time and to schedule.

Next week, we will be entering the fascinating world of Market Reporters!

Is our career advice helping you in your job search? Do let us know via our social media channels!

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Administrator in the Hot Seat: Cheryl O’garro

  • Who would you invite (and why) to your fantasy literary dinner party?

Meg Cabot has been one of my favourite authors since my teens, so she is non-negotiable. Richard Brinsley Sheridan and Jane Austen because their ear for wit, satire and the human condition is just fantastic. I think if the three of them got together, the resulting literary effort would  be a masterpiece. I’m just there for the great company!

  • If you could have written any book that exists now, which would it be?

How long do you have?! Off the top of my head, I would have to say either Harry Potter (for obvious reasons) or Northern Lights (the first of the His Dark Materials trilogy.) Both of those for me really draw you into their world and allow your imagination to really flow in a way that isn’t often possible outside of fantasy novels. I first read them when I was 7 and 10 respectively, and I would count both among my favourite books.

  • What has been the highlight/s of the past year?

The examiner telling me that my Masters’ thesis on the psycho-social benefits of hyper-engagement (a term I coined describing the adoption of arts consumption as a personality trait) had a strong and original voice and warranted elaboration. Who am I to decline that kind of professional and academic validation?! That is closely followed by my graduation ceremony in January.

  • If you were given the chance to have one superpower from any book/comic character, what would you have?

Right now it would have to be Quicksilver- the ability to move at great speed would be so useful for travelling and completing tasks. I’d still have my 24 hours in the day, but could fit in so much more! 

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Atwood Tate Book Club: Back to School

 

Have you ever wondered what a team of publishing recruitment specialists like to read in their down time? Curious about our favourite books growing up? Welcome to the Atwood Tate Book Club, where we reveal what books have a special place on our shelves! For this entry, we go back to school with our favourite reads from our educational careers.

Julie Irigaray, Trainee Recruitment Consultant

The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides

The first book I read after having passed the French equivalent of the GCSE (around the age of 15). I was moving to another school and to a higher level, so I suppose I needed to read a book about the changes taking place when one becomes a teenager. This novel deals with dark themes like suicide, sex and obsessional love in such a delicate way and with such a rich language that I couldn’t resist. The mystery surrounding both the main characters and the narrator makes it even more mesmerising.

 

Anna Slevin, Temps & Freelancers Administrator

Arcadia by Tom Stoppard.

I read the play for fun around the time I was sixteen and bored at school. The way time merges together and the interplay of language between characters really captures the imagination. I’m still wondering if it would be anywhere near as good on stage!

 

Claire Law, Managing Director

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood 

 

I did a course at Uni on Canadian Women’s literature and this and her other books had a great impact on my reading both for study and pleasure purposes from that point. I also decided to make a literary nod to her name when I set up Atwood Tate!

 

Helen Speedy, Associate Director

Der Kaukasische Kreidekreis (The Caucasian Chalk Circle) by Bertolt Brecht

I can’t remember whether Bertolt Brecht’s Der Kaukasische Kreidekreis (The Caucasion Chalk Circle) was one of my A-level set texts or an add on, but it remains one of the most influential plays that I have read. Our literature focus for German was Die Gerechtigkeit und das Gesetz, which translates as Justice and the Law.  When I got into trouble at school it was usually a rebellion in the face of injustice, so Brecht, who explores the concept of justice and the tendency for corruption to manipulate the law and even favour the criminal over the innocent, was appealing to me.  I recently re-read my other set text by Duerrenmatt, Der Richter und sein Henker (The Judge and his Hangman), and would recommend this as a quick and accessible read.  It’s a thriller (verging on noir) which delves into this issue of justice and (or versus) the law and I hope you can find it in translation somewhere if you don’t read German.

 

Charlotte Tope, Trainee Recruitment Consultant

Noughts and Crosses series by Malorie Blackman

I couldn’t put these books down – they delivered a great message, in a thoughtful way, to a young audience. Such an effortless read!

 

Faye Jones, Trainee Recruitment Consultant

The Great Gatsby by F.Scott Fitzgerald 

I studied The Great Gatsby for A Level English and become completely immersed in the characters and history behind 1920’s America. Even though the first chapter of the book is difficult to get through, I always recommend The Great Gatsby to anyone who’s looking for a short read and the film is great as well!

 

Cheryl O’garro, Administrator and Social Media Coordinator 

The School for Scandal by Richard Brinsley Sheridan 

This 18th century satire from Irish playwright Brinsley Sheridan was one of my AS level set texts and I have been in love with it ever since.  The play follows Lady Sneerwell and her band of gossips and the hypocrisy of their behaviour. The two plots are amazing: Sir Peter Teazle and his new, much younger wife and their marital troubles (half of which stems from society rumours)  and Sir Oliver Surface who, wanting to write his will, sets out in various character disguises to test if brothers Peter and Charles Surface are as respectively good and bad as society claims. I picked up a leather bound 1903 third edition copy from an antique book shop in Dublin (where he was born) and I was so happy I nearly hyperventilated!

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Industry Spotlight: Production and Operations

Welcome to Atwood Tate’s industry spotlight series, where we go behind the scenes of each of our recruitment desks to give you the scoop on working with Atwood Tate. This week’s entry is with Clare Chan, who works on Science, Technical, Medical, Distribution, Operations and Production roles across London, the Home Counties and East Anglia. In this entry, Clare will be breaking down how to get into Production, Distribution and Operations in the publishing sector.

Production

production

What does ‘production’ mean in publishing?

There is a wide range of production roles in publishing, most commonly Production Assistant, Production Controller, Production Editor and Production Manager. Production itself can be varied– covering printed and digital books, printed and digital journals and more. The skill set of a Production Manager in trade books versus a professional publisher can be very different, so it is all down to the content of what is being published to determine what kind of production knowledge you should have or what duties you will be doing in the role. So a role in children’s books will probably be highly illustrated and need someone with a good eye for detail and 4 colour experience.

What will be the academic requirement?

There isn’t a specific requirement to get into production roles.  You will need to demonstrate substantial project and supplier management as well as excellent communication skills because the majority of the suppliers will be offshore.  You will also need to have good software skills, i.e. Excel spreadsheets, InDesign and Adobe CS, Biblio3 (especially for trade book publishers) or XML publishing (for digital publishing).

What background will the clients be looking for?

Your previous experience plays a significant role when it comes to applying for production jobs.  Production roles are not as fluid as one would think when it comes to switching roles.  For instance, if you wanted to become a Production Controller in a children’s book publisher, you should have novelty book production experience and also knowledge of European toy safety legislation.  And if you are to work for a journals publisher, you will be working as a Production Editor and dealing with external typesetters to get the journals published which often also requires copy-editing skills.  More details about Production Editor will be discussed in my next blog when I explore STM editorial roles – keep your eyes open for that!

Is there good progression in production?

There is a good progression and a clear career strucutre and you will also become a production specialist as you build up solid knowledge from previous experience. One thing to bear in mind is that production technology is ever changing so keeping up with new software and technology is essential.  The book industry is a great example: decades ago, it was all about off-set printing, but now we have digital printing as well as e-book and audiobook production.

What key skills do you need?

A good learning attitude is a must.  Good communication skills, project management, time management, account management as you will manage different suppliers (most often overseas) and there could be pressing deadlines from time to time so being organised is important too. Numerical skills are also important as you’ll could be working with Excel, calculating and negotiating costs for reprints and shipping etc.

Distribution and Operations

operations

What roles are there in the Distribution and Operations in publishing?

We deal with a range of distribution and operations roles. Examples of roles we recruit for include Inventory Assistant, Inventory Coordinator, Stock Controller, Supply Chain Manager, and Head of Operations. Distribution and Operations plays an essential part in a publishing house, monitoring the inventory and arrange reprint or stock movement when needed.

What skills or knowledge will the clients be looking for?

Analytical skills and excellent software knowledge. You will be using Excel spreadsheets a lot, including Excel formulas. Depending on the publishers, you might also need to have certain software knowledge.  Communication and organisation skills are also essential as you will be coordinating with in-house colleagues from Design, Editorial, Rights, Sales & Marketing as well as external suppliers.

Is there good progression?

Similar to Production roles, Distribution and Operations are also a specialist roles with good progression.  You may eventually lead the team and be promoted to Inventory Manager and Head of Operations.  Keeping up with the latest data management technology will also lead you a long way in the field.  Candidates with Production experience may move laterally into Distribution and Operations for a change in their career path. There are always new opportunities!

If you have any questions about Production, Distribution or Operations roles, feel free to get in touch with Clare at clarechan@atwoodtate.co.uk!

 

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B2B Job Focus: Digital / Online / Web Editor

Are you a journalist or a section editor who wants to climb up the career ladder? In a previous post, Atwood Tate introduced you to the world of Section Editors. Today we’ll focus on Digital/Online/Web Editors!

Digital / Online / Web Editor

Web editor positions (also known as Digital or Online editors) developed as online publishing was spreading across publishing. It is now a rare thing for a publication to have a print version only but not so peculiar to have digital only titles! Web editors are responsible for creating content tailored for online publication. This includes a wide range of material from text to videos and podcasts. Web editors create and develop editorial guidelines to attract and increase online audience.

Web editors’ responsibilities include:

  • producing appealing content for the publication’s website, app, etc.
  • liaising with in-house team members and clients to adapt digital content
  • ensuring that search engine optimisation (SEO) is effective
  • overseeing the online publication’s layout (text, images, videos…)
  • developing and monitoring online communities
  • monitoring online messages boards and social media

 

Web editors act as the main point of contact with technical staff. They need to collaborate with several professionals (web developers, writers, photographers, web designers, the marketing team…) to enhance the website’s visibility. They also monitor online traffic to measure popularity and find new ways to make content attractive.

Required Skills

Not surprisingly, web editors should have strong IT skills. An excellent knowledge of desktop publishing and photo imaging packages like Photoshop and InDesign is necessary to work as a web editor. They must also be familiar with SEO and content management systems. They still need to have strong editorial skills though as this is ultimately an editorial position! And employers value creative candidates who can anticipate the next trade or burning topic within their industry.

Career Background

There is no particular route to become a web editor although a strong body of experience is often required. Many web editors have worked as journalists, and have solid knowledge of online publishing. Some digital editors move into editorial team management, but once again the career paths for this role are pretty flexible. With the boom of online publishing, many companies hired web editors and new graduates are all expected to be familiar with online publishing. It seems that this function is nowadays more and more engrained in Editor roles as onlube publishing has become inevitable and it is probable that this specific function will merge totally in an Editor role.

You can find relevant Digital/Online/Web Editor jobs here: www.atwoodtate.co.uk

Inspired by the different careers in B2B publishing and thinking about new opportunities? We are running a contest to receive a personalised CV surgery session with Karine, our Lead B2B Consultant, to make sure you are the best applicant you can be! Apply here between midnight 20th August and 11.59pm 2nd September to secure your chance!

 

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B2B Job Focus: Section Editors

Thinking of a career in B2B journalism? Atwood Tate is here to help! In a previous post we introduced you to the wonderful world of B2B publishing. Let’s continue our closer look at the different editorial career paths of B2B publishing with Section Editors!

Section Editors

 

Becoming a section editor is one of the career paths available to reporters/senior reporters interested in editing or getting some managerial experience. Section Editors can focus on a particular type of content like news or features. They could also specialise in a particular topic such as fashion, games or technology.

Section editors are responsible for overseeing the content of their part of the publication. They commission articles for their sections and work independently with their team of journalists (if the publication is big enough for them to have a team). They ensure that their section is of quality, up-to-date with the industry’s latest developments, and informative.

The duties associated with this role include:

  • scheduling content for their section of the magazine/website commissioning/writing articles
  • supervising freelance writers to ensure they hit deadlines and potentially managing in-house reporters.
  • editing, proofreading and subbing copy

Section editors may write some content for the publication but their main duty is to supervise writers and guarantee that deadlines and quality standards are met.

Our clients expect candidates to have solid experience as senior reporters to apply for a section editor position. They are looking for reporters with good proofreading and subbing skills as well as the ability to manage a team and to plan content for the section of the magazine.

The natural progression for section editors is to move on to a deputy editor position and then an editor role. No specific qualification is required to become a section editor but a journalism degree can be a bonus as previously stated in our Reporter focus.

Next week, we will be looking at the typical job description and career path for a Digital/Online/Web Editor position!

Is our career advice helping you in your job search? Do let us know via our social media channels!

Inspired by the different careers in B2B publishing and thinking about new opportunities? We are running a contest to receive a personalised CV surgery session with Karine, our Lead B2B Consultant, to make sure you are the best applicant you can be! Apply here between midnight 20th August and 11.59pm 2nd September to secure your chance!

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