Tag Archives: Job Seeking

B2B Job Focus: Reporters

Thinking of a career in B2B journalism? Atwood Tate is here to help! In a previous post we introduced you to the wonderful world of B2B publishing. Let’s now take a closer look at the different editorial career paths of B2B publishing, starting with Reporters!

Reporter/Journalists 

B2B Reporters/Journalists source and write news and features articles for a variety of formats, from print and online magazines to newspapers and broadcast (TV and radio).

B2B journalists investigate and report the latest news within a specific market. In this capacity, reporters may be required to travel nationally and/or internationally to cover industry events. Typical duties include:

  • Sourcing and writing news stories/features/opinion pieces about a specific market
  • Researching and interviewing key industry contacts to deliver accurate content
  • covering conferences and reporting on industry events
  • building strong contacts within the industry and developing an expertise of the market covered

B2B publications cover a wide range of subjects: from mechanical engineering to cabinet-making, energy to nursing, there is a publication for every trade!

Our clients are open to journalists without prior B2B experience for entry level positions. For roles requiring previous experience, a B2B background is desirable as writing for business audiences requires a different approach to consumer journalism. Some of our clients also value experience working for a local newspaper as local reporters often have strong investigation skills. Employers are looking for journalists with good research skills and the ability to pick up a subject quickly. You don’t have to know all about civil engineering to work for a civil engineering magazine, but you do need to be able to get to grips with the subject quite quickly. For more senior positions, our clients might ask for previous experience in a specific sector. This is particularly true with complex sectors such as finance or law.

Career paths vary according to what reporters are interested in. The natural progression for news-driven journalists would be from reporter to senior reporter and possibly section editor (news editor or features editor) positions if editing is something of interest. They can also choose to become assistant editors before moving on to a deputy editor and later editor positions, while those who prefer focusing on editing and copy-editing can become sub-editors. There is a thin line between all of these roles and your choice to follow one path or another will depend on your skills and preferences. Job titles can also mean different things in different companies (It’s confusing, we know!) Always read job adverts and job descriptions carefully before applying to try and understand what the role really entails. Or speak to your recruiter!

Is a formal qualification really necessary to become a journalist, I hear you ask? It isn’t an absolute requirement and some of our clients are quite happy with equivalent experience. A course might help craft your skills and teach you the basics of what makes a good reporter. If you can, we would recommend doing a course/training or gaining some relevant experience like internships before applying for a first job. The National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ) offers accredited courses and many universities have journalism degrees.

We hope this helps! Watch this space as we will continue the series next week, where our next post will be on section editors!

Inspired by the different careers in B2B publishing and thinking about new opportunities? We are running a contest to receive a personalised CV surgery session with Karine, our Lead B2B Consultant, to make sure you are the best applicant you can be! Apply here between midnight 20th August and 11.59pm 2nd September to secure your chance!

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Industry Spotlight: Sales and Customer Service

 

Welcome to Atwood Tate’s industry spotlight series, where we go behind the scenes of each of our recruitment desks to give you the scoop on working with Atwood Tate. This week’s entry is with Olivia Constantinides, who works on Sales, Marketing, Publicity and Customer Service roles in London and East Anglia. She covers all sectors, except B2B.

In this spotlight Olivia will focus on Sales and Customer Service roles and will tell you more about what these jobs involve and the types of skills they require. At a later date she will cover Marketing and Publicity positions.

Types of roles

Sales roles in publishing are really diverse. Whether you’re an Account Manager looking after existing customers or a Business Development Manager focused on bringing in new business, your job is to build relationships with customers and persuade them to buy your company’s products or services.

One of the great things about working in sales is that you get to handle the finished product, whether that be a children’s book, a scientific journal or an online learning platform. You also get a real insight into the market and what the customer wants or needs. This knowledge is invaluable for the business as a whole and can be used to influence what is published in the future and how products are marketed to customers.

Some sales roles will include elements of customer service and if you’re selling digital products or software, you may train customers how to use it.

Customer service roles are closely linked to sales and involve dealing with the customer post-sales, usually over phone or email. Common responsibilities include answering order or stock related queries or resolving problems and complaints.

Do sales roles involve lots of cold calling?

A common misconception is that sales roles involve endless cold calling. It’s not usually like that in publishing. You might be selling books to bookshops or retailers, or software to universities, libraries and hospitals. Therefore you’ll need to meet customers face to face and adopt a softer and more consultative sales approach.

What is the pay like in sales?

Sales salaries often exceed those of other roles. In addition to your basic annual salary you will likely receive a bonus or commission based on the amount you sell and revenue that you bring in for the company. This might be paid out monthly, quarterly or annually. It is sometimes uncapped so your earning capacity is limitless.

Is there good room for progression?

There is really good room for progression in sales. You could start out in a sales support or administrative role and gradually progress to managing your own accounts and then eventually overseeing a team of sales people.

One of the advantages of sales roles is that the skills you develop are really transferable so you could find yourself working for a variety of publishers and selling to a variety of customers. Skilled sales people will always be in demand.

Whilst there aren’t nearly as many customer service roles out there, there is still good room for progression and you could end up managing a team of Customer Service advisors and overseeing the strategy for the department. Like sales, the skills you develop are very transferable and customer service people often find themselves working for a range of organisations.

Do you get to travel?

Sales roles will usually involve some element of travel but the amount will depend largely on the role. You might look after a specific territory, which could be as big as London or the whole of the UK. Some roles can cover regions as large as Europe, the Middle East, Latin America or Asia. International sales people may find they are travelling at least 50% of their time. If you like being out and about, a field based or international sales role would suit you.

On the other hand, some roles are more office based, with most sales being conducted over the phone or via email and only occasional visits to customers being needed. You may find the opportunities to travel increase as you progress into more senior positions.

Customer service roles are usually office based but depending on the company you work for, you may take occasional trips to visit colleagues in other offices, which could be in the UK or overseas.

 

What key skills do you need to succeed?

To succeed in sales you need excellent communication and presentation skills. You need to be results and target driven with a good head for numbers and a knack for negotiating. You also need to be driven, determined and ambitious.

For customer service roles, excellent communication skills are also vital along with the ability to problem solve and empathise with customers.

If you’re considering a sales or customer service role in publishing or already work in the industry and are looking for your next opportunity, contact Olivia at olivia@atwoodtate.co.uk.

 

Atwood Tate recruits across all levels and all functions so if you are looking for a new role in publishing please get in touch with us at info@atwoodtate.co.uk. We also have a very active temps and freelance desk, so if you are open to short term contracts or are looking to boost your freelance career, you can reach Alison at alisonredfearn@atwoodtate.co.uk.

 

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Industry Spotlight: E-learning, Educational and Academic

 

Welcome to Atwood Tate’s industry spotlight series, where we go behind the scenes of each of our recruitment desks to give you the scoop on working with Atwood Tate. Our next entry is with our  fantastic editorial desk, manned by Christina Dimitriadi and Charlotte Tope.

Introduction

Welcome to the busy Editorial Desk where Christina, our Senior Recruitment Consultant and recent addition Charlotte, man the editorial fort. We look after all of the editorial roles that come in, for the Educational, E-learning, Assessment & Testing, Academic, Professional and Trade sectors in London and East Anglia. Pretty much all sectors minus STM, which our lovely consultant Clare Chan takes care off, and B2B which you read about in our last desk spotlight blog (if you missed it you can check it out here).

Today, we are going to focus on the Educational, E-learning and Academic sectors, tell you more about what they are, how they differ and what roles we cover. In a future post we will cover trade and the professional sectors.

Educational Publishing

Educational Publishing is one of the largest sectors of publishing in the UK and it covers the whole spectrum, from curriculum publishers for primary and secondary schools to higher education publishers for university level. Educational publishing is dedicated to the creation and publication of textbooks and curriculum material for schools and higher education institutions. This includes the development of any additional content needed to support the course; such as workbooks, digital software, interactive websites and teacher’s guides. We work with candidates from their first roles up to the latest stages of their career development and positions you will be seeing advertised will range including Editorial Assistants, Project Editors, Commissioning Editors, Managing Editors, Product Managers, Heads of Editorial Content and Publishers.

ELT

A growing division of educational publishing is ELT which stands for English Language Teaching and focuses on the development of print and digital resources for students learning English as a second language. This can be primary school students up to adults learning English for professional or academic purposes. For positions in the ELT editorial sector we will be usually looking for candidates with an excellent command of the English language, very strong editorial skills, and some ELT teaching experience. People coming from a teaching background have a very valuable insight of knowing first-hand which products do or don’t work in the classroom. Any relevant ELT qualification can also be an advantage, such as CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) or DELTA (Diploma in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages).

E-Learning, Assessment and Testing

We also work with a range of publishers and providers of online courses for teaching, research, studying and assessment. This is an exciting aspect of educational publishing that has been rapidly expanding in the digital age and we are seeing more products moving away from the traditional text heavy books or paper products to new and innovative forms of online learning content, interactive courses, modules and assessments. The jobs we cover here would range from traditional editorial roles to Digital Content Developers, Instructional Designers and Product Managers. Our candidates will usually have a solid print or digital publishing or ed-tech background and they would focus on the technical development of the product/course, for example its usability and performance as an educational resource.

Academic Publishing

Academic publishing is intended to communicate the latest research and developments to the academic community. We work with a rage of smaller and larger publishers and societies who publish scholarly journals, books, eBooks, text books and reference works for researchers, students and academic libraries. It is common for universities and museums to publish academic books, aimed particularly at academics and we also work with academic associations, who share information with their members or the public. Depending on the discipline, academic publishing can be split into two sectors, humanities and social sciences (HSS) and scientific, technical and medical (STM). A common term you will hear when applying for academic journals roles is the peer review process, which is a procedure of reviewing and evaluating the quality and validity of articles prior to publication. You can read more about the process here and on the websites of the majority of academic publishers. Common roles you will see us looking for are Editorial Assistants, Publications Editors, Commissioning Editors and Publishers.

 

We hope this blog gives you a good idea of the sectors we work within and what roles we cover. More desk spotlights are scheduled to come so do keep an eye on our website. For more information on editorial roles in educational, e-learning and academic publishing feel free to contact Christina at christina@atwoodtate.co.uk or Charlotte and charlottetope@atwoodtate.co.uk.

Atwood Tate recruits across all levels and all functions so if you are looking for a new role in publishing please get in touch with us at info@atwoodtate.co.uk. We also have a very active temps and freelance desk so of you are open to short term contracts or are looking to boost your freelance career, you can reach Alison at alisonredfearn@atwoodtate.co.uk.

 

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Industry Spotlight: B2B

Welcome to Atwood Tate’s industry spotlight series, where we go behind the scenes of each of our recruitment desks to give you the scoop on working with Atwood Tate. Our next entry is with our  fantastic B2B desk, manned by Karine Nicpon and Julie Irigaray.  Karine and Julie help match B2B clients and candidates across the country, with a variety of roles across a range of business sectors.

What is B2B publishing?

B2B or business-to-business publications are industry focussed and aimed at people in work. They are also called ‘professional’ or ‘trade’ journals (which are different from academic journals, don’t get confused!). An example would be The Bookseller or InPublishing: both are B2B magazines aimed at the publishing industry. There are as many B2B publishing sectors as there are job industries. You will find business publications for lawyers and finance professionals, but also construction workers, nurses, farmers, the list goes on. B2B readerships can be ‘vertical’ (publication is aimed at a specific industry, such as lawyers) or ‘horizontal’ (the audience is spread over many industries, such as PAs). These titles can be weekly, fortnightly, monthly, quarterly etc. in print and/or digital. A lot of B2B publishers also run conferences and events aimed at the industries they cover. Some publishing groups publish both B2B and B2C magazines.

What is the difference between a B2B and a B2C publication?

B2B is aimed at people in a professional capacity whilst B2C publications are consumer magazines made to entertain/inform in a more general capacity (such as fashion magazines or TV listings) or consumer specialist titles about a special interest/hobby (e.g. music, cookery, photography). We need to differentiate these two sectors from customer publishers/content marketing agencies who produce content aimed at customers on behalf of a specific company. Examples include free inflight magazines or supermarket magazines. Some customer publishers have become more specialised and produce print and digital content on behalf of businesses, charities, educational or professional bodies, who might not have an in-house publishing team.

What publishing sectors does Atwood Tate cover?

Atwood Tate is a specialist publishing recruitment agency. We work with publishers across a number of sectors from consumer books (fiction/non-fiction), educational and academic publishing to STM (scientific, technical and medical) publishing.

On the magazine side of things, we mainly focus on B2B publishing and events and also work with information providers. We sometimes do have vacancies across customer/contract publishing as some of our clients do both B2B and custom publishing. But we rarely represent consumer-only publishers, unless their publications are niche/specialist magazines, which we find have a lot of similarities with B2B publishing in terms of skills required to fit a role.

Does B2B publishing automatically mean finance or legal publishing?

Not at all! As mentioned above, B2B publishing can cover any industry. We very often do have roles in financial publishing but we also partner with clients producing content for retail or marketing professionals, GPs, lawyers, optometrists, etc. If you chose to work in B2B publishing, you could end up covering any subject; the possibilities are endless!

What roles can Atwood Tate help with in B2B publishing?

We recruit across all publishing functions from content creation (reporter, features writer, news editor, copy-editor/sub-editor, managing editor, etc.) to production (designer, production editor, production manager) and sales, events or marketing roles. We also have more specialised roles such as market/price reporters or data journalists. And we can even help with IT roles as we have an IT consultant! We recruit for permanent and contract or temp/freelance roles.

For more information about B2B publishing, feel free to contact Karine  at karinenicpon@atwoodtate.co.uk or Julie at JulieIrigaray@atwoodtate.co.uk. For B2B temp/freelance roles, please contact Kellie Millar  at kelliemillar@atwoodtate,co.uk

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Industry Spotlight: Temping

 

 

Welcome to Atwood Tate’s industry spotlight series, where we go behind the scenes of each of our recruitment desks to give you the scoop on working with Atwood Tate. Our first entry is with our wonderful temps and freelancers desk, manned by Kellie Millar and Alison Redfearn. Kellie and Alison help clients not just in London but nationwide, and they work with temps and freelancers at all levels, in all publishing sectors from trade and education to Scientific and academic as well as professional and B2B. They also proudly help and support many interns gain their first paid assignments in publishing. The temps desk is supported by Anna Slevin, who helps with on-boarding new temps, administering holiday pay and dealing with all time sheet or payroll issues.

How can temping benefit my career?

Companies can’t always predict when they’ll need someone. The requirements can come fast and without notice and are urgent. If you’ve been struggling to get a job, through temping, you could actually start working tomorrow.

Due to the urgency of the requirement, sometimes, there isn’t even time for an interview. At most, the client may ask for just a quick, informal phone call so they can ask some relevant questions and gauge a candidate’s answers and then hire. That’s how quick it can be sometimes – you might hear from us on Monday and start working on Tuesday. Sometimes, our temps move directly from one role to another, developing new skills and using the temping experience to further their publishing careers step by step, or even get made permanent! Temps can be booked to cover sick leave, holiday, special projects or to take the pressure off a team whilst they are recruiting for a permanent role – they may even hire you!

What type of job sectors do you cover?

We cover temp and freelance roles across the book, journal and B2B magazine sector as well as  the ever evolving digital publishing and IT technology sectors within Editorial, Marketing, Sales and Production, Product Development, E-Learning as well as Admin and Customer Support.

What type of roles can I get as a temp?

Here is a small sample of roles we have placed!

  • Social Media and Marketing Assistant, Trade Publisher
  • Customer Support Administrator, Magazine Publisher
  • Editorial Assistant (Exams), Educational Publisher
  • Brand and Marketing Executive, Children’s Publisher
  • Production Controller, Arts Publisher
  • Part time Publicity Assistant, Non Fiction
  • Publicity Manager, Fiction Publisher
  • Marketing Executive, Scientific Publisher
  • Legislation Editor, Legal publisher
  • Freelance Sub Editor, B2B publisher

How would I get paid?

Temps are added to Atwood Tate’s payroll and get paid on a weekly basis, on an hourly rate. We use online timesheets for you to record your hours, which your manager approves. Temps also accrue holiday pay and can also opt into pensions too. Payments are paid directly into your bank account each Friday, just in time for the weekend!

What if I want to go permanent?

Temping can be an excellent route to finding a permanent role in publishing. You can treat the temporary assignment like a working interview and network with your team and various departments to learn about roles that may be coming up. There is the possibility while you are temping to be offered a permanent role. You can also apply for any internal roles you see being advertised. The beauty of temping is the variety, the opportunity to explore. More senior candidates also enjoy the flexibility that temping or freelancing offers. For those of you starting out, you can build up your admin and publishing experience and even if you don’t go temp to perm through your temp assignment, the experience gained and added to your growing CV, will put you in good stead for applying for future permanent roles.

For more information about temping or freelancing do feel free to contact us via Atwood Tate’s “Meet the team” page or to apply for temp and freelancer roles visit our job pages 

 

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PPA Festival: CEOs Discuss Employee Potential

In May, Karine and Julie attended the PPA Festival, the leading business media and publishing event of the year. More than 700 professionals gathered to network and attend panels throughout the day.

THE X FACTOR discussion, chaired by Kathleen Saxton (founder of The Lighthouse Company), was one of the highlights of the day. The theme of this panel was how to find talent and nurture employee potential.

The guest speakers were:

Kevin Costello, CEO, Haymarket Media Group
Amanda Barnes, CEO, Faversham House Group
Jonathon Whiteley, CEO, Incisive Media

 

The three panellistsinsightful advice is relevant for graduates and experienced professionals alike. When asked to share their vision of leadership, they highlighted the importance of creating a good culture within the company. In order for employees to be successful, leaders need to provide a supportive and stimulating environment to be successful. A motivated team, which shares the company’s values, is more a guarantee of success than a good leader.

The panel had to answer the common questions about how to break into the industry. The CEOs replied they were generally open to a wide range of profiles as long as candidates match their culture.

Some smaller businesses like Incisive Media do not have apprenticeships, but others like Haymarket Media offer training programs where graduates learn a set of relevant skills to enter the industry. The CEO stated that 75% of their trainees were subsequently hired. For Faversham House, being based in Sussex can be an impediment to attracting talent. As a result, the company tends to hire entry level or fairly junior staff and focus on its employees’ strengths, helping them to develop their career according to their skills and personality.

All the speakers agreed that school and university leavers wishing to enter the industry should focus  on soft skills, as it is attitude which makes a candidate outstanding. Good communication skills and self-confidence are highly valued by employers, as well as taking initiative and seeking feedback to continually improve oneself.

The digital revolution has also had an impact on the kind of skills employers are looking for. With their constant development, data and technology are the two big areas where roles have changed drastically. The people working in B2B publishing have changed too: they need be more agile and develop their adaptability. The CEO of Haymarket pointed out that it has become harder to find talent for the digital sector as there is a real shortage of candidates. To solve this issue Haymarket is trying to develop and build their own talent pool via apprenticeships.

If you are a motivated candidate with great communication skills who wants to work in digital publishing, this is a good time for you!

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What is GDPR? A guide for our candidates…

The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a new EU regulation that will come into force on 25 May 2018. It will strengthen the current rules under the Data Protection Act (1998) by introducing new obligations for organisations and rights for individuals.

The GDPR will apply to businesses that are outside of the EU but continue to provide services to individuals from EU Member States, so will be applicable even after Brexit.

How does it affect you?

You’ve probably received a *delete as appropriate: large/enormous/mailbox breaking number of emails from companies alerting you to opt in to keep receiving emails and probably like me, you’ve followed up on a few and left quite a lot unanswered for them to assume you’re no longer interested and happy to be deleted.

As a company working with people and handling their data, we understand it’s vital to protect the privacy of data for our candidates, clients and everyone we’re working with across the recruitment process.

We’ve been making changes to the way we process your data and how long we keep it for and will be contacting our candidates to make sure we’re only holding data you’re happy for us to. You will be able to login at any time and update your preferences or change your consent options.

We’re updating many of our Policies, Contract and Forms to ensure we’re fully compliant. You can find our Privacy Policy here.

We’re members of the REC (Recruitment and Employment Confederation) and they’ve produced a great Infographic for jobseekers –  know your data protection rights.

Any questions, get in touch with Claire Law, Managing Director Atwood Tate’s Data Protection Officer (DPO) at clairelaw@atwoodtate.co.uk

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The Spare Room Project: Helen’s Experience Hosting Publishing Interns

What is the Spare Room Project and how does it work?

Let’s be honest, opportunities in the publishing industry are mainly in London and this can be a real obstacle for anyone looking to enter the industry from outside of the capital. This is where the Spare Room Project comes in.  In 2016, James Spackman (publisher and consultant) with the support of the Publishers Association, set up this project, which provides aspiring publishers with the opportunity to stay in the city for free and take up work experience placements.

So how does it work?  It’s simple really: interns are matched with hosts who are willing to offer their spare room for a week.  If you sign up to the Spare Room Project, you’ll be added to a mailing list and alerted when there are new lodgers to host.  There’s no immediate obligation to host and you only need reply when you see dates that will work for you.  I would urge anyone with a spare room to sign up and see whether you can help now or in the future.

Helen’s experience hosting interns

I’m excited to be hosting my third Spare Room Project intern in June.  Not being a Londoner by upbringing, I am sympathetic to the challenges facing anyone looking to enter the industry from outside of the publishing hubs of London, Oxford and Cambridge, so it’s been great to be involved in this scheme.  It’s not only good to be doing something practical to enable those without existing contacts to gain an insight into publishing and hopefully get a foot in the door, but it’s also been an enjoyable and enriching experience from my point of view.  We’ve had two quite different guests so far, one who was a huge fan of musical theatre and managed to get cheap tickets for shows most evenings, so we hardly saw her and our second guest, who quickly became part of the family and was a huge hit with (and incredibly tolerant of) my children.  Quite different experiences, but both were perfect lodgers and no problem at all to host.

You can find out more here https://thespareroomproject.co.uk/ or on their Twitter, @SpareRoomProj, and don’t just take my word for it, read some of the testimonials on the PA’s website and check out their FAQs https://www.publishers.org.uk/activities/inclusivity/spare-room-project/.

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Why you should apply for a job through Atwood Tate

There is an unfortunate misconception among some job-seekers that recruitment agencies don’t offer any additional value over applying directly to a company. An even worse myth is that applying through an agency will cost you money, either up front or off your future salary! This is absolutely not the case, so today I’d like to counter a few of these myths with the facts.

Our service is completely free to candidates

The way we make money is by charging our clients a percentage commission from the salary of any candidate we place with them. This does NOT come off the candidate’s salary. In fact, it just comes out of the client’s recruitment budget. Every vacancy will have a recruitment budget, whether the company is recruiting in house or outsourcing to an agency. There are costs involved with in house recruitment as well as agency recruitment, but these will not impact you as a candidate.

We can tell you more than a job ad

There’s only so much you can tell from a job ad, or even a detailed job description. We get briefed directly by the hiring manager so we understand exactly what the job entails and what the hiring manager is looking for. We can also help you prep for the interview and tell you what to expect.

We make sure you get feedback

There’s nothing worse than going to a job interview and getting rejected without a word of feedback. We make sure you get feedback after every interview, so you can improve your technique for next time. We’ll keep you updated at all stages of the recruitment process so you’re never left in the dark.

We can negotiate on your behalf

Sometimes the salary range is non-negotiable, but other times there is room for discussion on either the salary or the whole package. We are experienced negotiators and have great relationships with our clients, so are happy to handle this for you.

Register for our free job alerts

We offer a fast, free email job alert service which lets you know immediately when we have new jobs in which match your preferences. If you’re on our database, we’ll get in touch with you directly when we have a role in for you, so you can be the first to get your application in without having to spend all your time refreshing job sites.

 

We can help you find a new role, whether you’re looking for freelance work, a temporary contract or a permanent role – full or part time. Have a look at our current vacancies on our website and apply online, or email your CV to info@atwoodtate.co.uk so we can add you to our database!

 

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5 Great Reasons to Work in Academic Publishing

Today marks the end of Academic Book Week 2018 (#AcBookWeek), which is ‘a week-long celebration of the diversity, variety and influence of academic books aiming to open up a dialogue between the makers, providers and readers of academic books.’

Academic publishers produce and sell scholarly journals, books, eBooks, text books and reference works for researchers, students and academic libraries. We work with a lot of academic publishers on a variety of roles, from Editors to Marketing gurus to Production Controllers to Salespeople, in permanent, temporary and freelance positions. It’s an exciting and rewarding industry to be in, and here’s why:

  1. You work on cutting-edge research from top academics. The articles and books you publish will help teach new generations of students, and may even revolutionise the field. You could even publish work on sociology and politics which helps to shape public policy. If you’re looking for a rewarding career that makes a difference, academic publishing could be for you.
  2. Use your strong academic background in a related field. Your humanities or arts degree or postgraduate degree will be invaluable in an editorial role in academic publishing, so you can continue working on the subjects you love. (N.b. you do NOT need a PhD to work in academic publishing, but it is an advantage in some areas. A keen interest in the subject area is essential.)
  3. In a world of fake news and the devaluation of experts, be part of an industry which values intellectual rigour and research integrity through peer review processes.
  4. Be at the centre of exciting debates and advances in the industry. Join the debate on Open-Access or be at the forefront of technological advances in academic materials and e-learning. If you’re into tech and finding new ways of engaging digitally-savvy audiences, academic publishing is an exciting place to be.
  5. While it’s not all about the money, the salaries are often higher in academic publishing than in other sectors like trade.

So what’s your favourite thing about working in academic publishing?

For more information about what academic publishing is and how you can get into it, see our blog posts here and here.

To see our current academic vacancies, click here.

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