Tag Archives: jobs

How to use LinkedIn to get a Job

LinkedIn

How to use LinkedIn to get a Job

LinkedIn is a professional social media site, with over 225 million users, which is a great place to start when beginning a job search.

Whilst not social in the sense of funny meme sharing and night out gossip, is a great way to socialise and network with potential employers and recruiters. It is also a great hub for learning more about different industries and networking.

If you attend an event, for example the London Book Fair, and meet a publishing professional in the queue of a café, get their name and link up with them afterwards. You never know where a future encounter might take you, and having a LinkedIn account can make it so much easier!

As such, the first step is to create a LinkedIn account!

Whether you’re looking for an apprenticeship, internship, part-time, temporary or permanent role, having a LinkedIn account can be really beneficial.

Not only can you create your own LinkedIn account for people to find, you can also follow other people’s accounts and company profiles. Such as our own: Atwood Tate.

We regularly post our latest jobs, competitions, blogs, and industry news on our account so it is worth following! You can also follow our recruitment consultants and have a one-to-one way of communicating and access to their latest jobs in their sector of job type.

For example: Karine Nicpon handles Editorial roles in B2B and will post these jobs to her LinkedIn account.

But firstly, you need your own account.

Here are some simple tips on how to make your account as professional as possible and use LinkedIn to get a job:

  • Make sure your profile photo is clear and professional. Do not upload a picture of yourself on your latest night out or of striking a silly pose. Use a photo that shows your whole face, is un-blurred and looks professional but approachable.
  • Add your experience – LinkedIn is more social than a CV so you don’t have to be as thoroughly detailed or structured, you can describe your roles with simple bullet points or a brief description. You can also write in first person rather than third.
  • Use keywords – some recruiters search by specific words, for example we search for the keyword Publishing and, depending on roles we have in, editorial or publishing sales etc. But you can also include keywords like office experience, languages, B2B, admin experience etc
  • Fill out everything! If you have volunteer experience, however small, add it, along with any accomplishments you are proud of and any skills or hobbies that you have.
  • Include your contact details – these will only be available to people that you accept as followers, but a recruiter will need them to get in contact with you about potential jobs.
  • Upload a CV! As a recruiter this is really important to us, as this will hold more details on your education, background and specific skills. It is also what a recruiter will need for when they later put you forward for jobs!

Once you have made your LinkedIn account as professional as possible you can follow people!

Companies:

  • Follow companies you are interested in for information on their business, where they’re based, their company size and any jobs that they are advertising.
  • Follow the companies that you have worked for in the past, however small. Link them to your work experience categories to give more information to future employees!
  • Follow recruitment companies for information on their latest jobs! You can see our current jobs on LinkedIn here.

Contacts:

  • Contact friends, colleagues and family to link up as contacts. Not only can you stay in touch (it is a social network after all) but you can also endorse each other’s skills! This lets companies/recruiters know that you’re telling the truth when you say you have experience in HTML, French and Networking, for example.
  • Follow old colleagues and tutors/teachers for potential referrals for future jobs. The more contacts you have the better.
  • Follow recruitment consultants or HR recruiters at potential companies you would like to work for. They might get in touch directly in future.

Now you’ve created your profile and linked up with people you can start applying for roles advertised on companies LinkedIn pages. You can even search for potential roles in the search bar and get job alerts to let you know when a job fitting your preferences and previous job searches becomes available.

We hope that this post helps you with your job search! And we hope that you’ll come and follow us on our LinkedIn account for more details and news on all our latest jobs, our business and industry news. You can also follow us on our other social media accounts: Twitter, Facebook, YouTube or Instagram.

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Advice from the Careers Clinic

Advice from the Careers Clinic

Advice from the Careers Clinic

Last week two of our consultants, Alison and Karine attended the London Book Fair Careers Clinic, run by bookcareers.com.

For all of those who were unable to attend the book fair or the Careers Clinic we wanted to provide you with the information which was most requested by those that attended.

How to write a Good CV:

We have many blog posts on writing a good CV, which you can read here:

The main things to remember when writing a CV is to include all of your publishing experience and to keep it clean and simple.

You must also remember a Cover Letter. The main thing about a cover letter is that you tailor it to each job you apply for. Try not to over complicate things and keep it as concise as possible.

For more information on cover letters take a look at this blog post:

Work Experience

The most popular questions at the Careers Clinic were about work experience.

We don’t handle work experience or internships. But to gain an entry-level job in publishing you need to have at least 3 month’s work experience in publishing.

You can gain this experience through a work experience placement, internship or through temping.

For more information about temping take a look at this post written by our temp team’s administrator Michael:

Temping is a great way to gain paid work experience, and possibly gain a full-time job upon completion of your contract. If you’re looking for an entry-level role Alison Redfearn and Kellie Millar, our temps team consultants, are your best point of contact at Atwood Tate.

For more information about looking for work experience, internships and other ways to gain experience within publishing we suggest you look at our Work Experience and Entry-Level resources page:

We hope all of this helps you on your career search. We’re always happy to answer any questions you have about gaining experiencing, applying for roles or registering with us online.

To register with Atwood Tate you can upload your CV and preferences here, and we will get back to you with information as soon as possible: Registration page. 

You can also take a look at our publishing resources leaflet which we were handing out at the careers clinic: Publishing Resources Leaflet

If you want to know something in particular get in contact with us on any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Our Plans for the London Book Fair & Giveaway

Plans for London Book Fair & Giveaway

Our Plans for the London Book Fair & Giveaway

With the London Book Fair officially one week away we thought we would share with you our plans for the event!

Every day of the fair there will be at least 5 members of the Atwood Tate staff milling around Olympia, either at our stand, in the Ivy Club or around the fair.

When we are at our stand (3B26, in tech) and we’re not deep in conversation , feel free to approach us. During the week we do have meetings throughout the day so we may not always be available to chat – as much as we’d like to!

You can still take a look at our stand however! We will be bringing a lot of things with us:

  • Leaflets – with all our information and details about our services
  • Printables – Are you looking for work experience? Or useful information about getting into publishing? We will have some print outs available with some resources for you!
  • Sweets – One of the most important things at any book fair: sugary sustenance.
  • Current Vacancies – We’ll have a list of all of our current vacancies at our stand as well.

We will also be on social media a lot! Not only during the London Book Fair but this week as well!

Competitions

This year we are also running competitions! The first is a Giveaway: Win £100 worth of vouchers by liking and sharing our LinkedIn page! Starting from tomorrow (8th March) and ending on the 16th of March, the last day of the London Book Fair, you could win a great prize! And all you have to do is follow our LinkedIn page and share the post on Twitter. For more entries you can also share and like our LinkedIn posts on this Giveaway!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Also, if you follow us on Twitter you may have noticed a certain competition we’re starting for this year’s Book Fair!

The first person to come up to us, on each day of the London Book Fair, and says: ‘Atwood Tate we hear you’re great’ will win a £10 book voucher!

The earlier you get to our stand (3B26) and say this, the better. We’ll announce when someone has won the prize each day on our Twitter feed. However please respect the consultants work; if they’re in a meeting at the stand please don’t disturb them. The fair is an industry event after all.

Other Plans

On Tuesday 14th you may spot our Administrator Ellie wandering around with a camera as she films a London Book Fair Vlog for our YouTube channel! Be sure to say hello and tell us your thoughts on the London Book Fair if you get a chance!

On Thursday 16th, between 2:30pm-5:00pm, two of our Consultants: Karine Nicpon & Alison Redfearn will be attending the Career’s Clinic. You can bring your CV and have a quick 5 minute chat with them about the next step in your career!

All in all we have a lot going on!

Make sure you follow us across all our social media, and use the hashtag #LBF17, to keep up to date with what is happening at the Fair. As well as receive advice, hints and tips on what to bring and see at the London Book Fair: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

We can’t wait to meet you all!

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Types of Sales Roles in B2B Publishing

Types of Sales Roles B2B

Types of Sales Roles in B2B Publishing

There are many different types of sales roles within publishing. It is worth asking what type of sales role you are applying for, and highlighting which type you’ve done on your CV, when applying for a job.

Our Sales Consultant in the London office, Olivia, has put together a list of the key types of sales roles to explain further.

The key types are:

  • Delegate – selling delegate spaces (i.e. tickets) to attend events and conferences
  • Sponsorship – selling sponsorship opportunities for events. It can also refer to sponsored editorial content, which is when companies pay to publish an article in your publication as a way of promoting their own brand.
  • Advertising – selling advertising space. Can be either print (e.g. a print publication or magazine) or online (eg. a website). It can also be classified (i.e. no graphics, inexpensive small messages) or display (these include graphics and colour and might take up half a page or more).
  • Subscriptions – selling a subscription to a product. Can be print (e.g. a print publication or magazine) or digital (e.g. an online database or service).
  • Conference production – this isn’t really classified as media sales. It’s basically a varied mix of sales, marketing, editorial and project management but for entry level conference production roles clients usually want someone with some sales experience, such as delegate sales.

A B2B Sales role, for example, could involve just one or several of these types of sales. It’s quite common to see delegate and sponsorship sales together or delegate and subscriptions.

Generally the skill set required for each type of sales role, and the types of clients they deal with, will be similar. But it’s always best to check with our consultants beforehand which ones the role involves just to avoid confusion.

For more information about Sales roles you can view our current vacancies page and select Sales in preferences.

You can also contact us on info@atwoodtate.co.uk or 020 7034 7900. Or via social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

 

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Writing a Winning Sales CV

Writing a Winning Sales CV

Writing a Winning Sales CV

Creating the perfect CV is one of the most important things for any job seeker. But particularly so for sales people. Where a journalist can submit samples of their writing or a designer a portfolio of work, as a sales person your CV has to do most of the talking.

Having reviewed many CVs in my time in recruitment, I’ve come to identify what makes an effective and well written CV for sales roles. There are many simple bits of information that candidates miss out which may affect their chances of being considered for a job.

So you don’t make the same mistake, I’ve compiled some guidelines of key things to include!

Whether a second jobber or an experienced sales manager you should include:

  • Sales figures – Where possible you should include details of revenue achieved, targets met, sales made etc… Always make sure they are honest and that you can back them up if asked about them in an interview.
  • Achievements – You should give examples of particular successes you’ve had, whether securing a large deal, signing on a new client…
  • Products & clients – If you’ve worked for a large organisation do specify what area of the business or publication you worked on or what type of products you were selling. It’s also useful to know who you were selling to or specific regions you dealt with.
  • Languages – If you have professional competency in more than one language and would be willing to use it at work, tell us! It might be just what a particular client is looking for.
  • Travel – If you are used to travelling a lot and enjoy it, it’s good to know and if applying for field sales positions, do mention if you have a clean driving licence and car.
  • Line management – If you’ve managed staff, say how many and whether they were office or field based.

Last but not least, being a successful sales person is often very much about your personality so don’t be afraid to let this show on your CV. Also remember that you need strong communication skills and to be well presented and professional so your CV should demonstrate this.

For more general advice on CV layout, you should visit https://atwoodtatepublishingjobs.co.uk/advice/.

If you have any questions get in touch via social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Companies: Why You Should Consider Temps

Why You Should Consider Temps

Companies: Why You Should Consider Temps

Our articles on temping have typically been to inform candidates of the many benefits that come with temping, both professionally and personally. But today, we’d like to point out the many reasons why temping is such a useful avenue for clients to consider.

  • The flexibility of temps also means company flexibility.

If you’re expanding your team but you’re not quite prepared to hire a permanent person, a temporary employee is a great way to establish exactly what it is you need in terms of additional resources. Maybe you’ve never had extra hands on deck and you’re only now starting to realise the new objectives you can tackle. A temp-to-perm scenario can be a match made in heaven for company and employee alike. As someone grows into a newly created role and reveals the kind of results that can be produced with more staff. The manager can then take these results to HR as Exhibit A on what expanding the team can mean for everyone.

But more than that,

  • Temps bring their own expertise with them.

They don’t need to be entry-level candidates acting as a stop-gap. By hiring consultants or veteran freelancers, a company also gets to avail of a temporary worker’s own experiences, the different business practices they’ve witnessed in their time. New blood often means new ideas and even if the worker doesn’t stick around, their contributions can last forever.

And, of course,

  • Temporary workers can provide much needed breathing space to permanent employees.

When the day-to-day administration is taken off their hands, they’re able to concentrate on the bigger picture and implement the projects. This improve service and streamline practices. You can get a lot done when you don’t have to sweat the small stuff. Even if it’s only for a little while.

So, for anyone who’s currently reviewing team numbers or work-loads, don’t commit until you know for sure exactly what you need – try a temp today! Get in touch with Kellie Millar, who manages our Temps and Freelancers desk, or her colleague, Alison Redfearn, and they can send you more workers than you can shake a stick at!

5 reasons to get a temp:

  • Cover sick leave
  • Cover holiday
  • Help with a project
  • Flexibility – have for 1 day / 1 week / 1 month…
  • No admin – we cover all payment, NI, holiday pay, pension

Kellie Millar
E: kelliemillar@atwoodtate.co.uk
Tel: 02070347897

Alison Redfearn
E: alisonredfearn@atwoodtate.co.uk
Tel: 02070347922

You can also contact us with any questions via our social media pages: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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The Academic Publishing Sector

Academic Publishing Header

Academic Publishing

In keeping with Academic Book Week (#AcBookWeek), today’s blog we’re discussing the Academic Sector in all its glory.

Most candidates, particularly new candidates to publishing, tend to overlook academic publishing. But Academic Publishing is a cutting edge and often a very exciting sector to work in!

An academic publisher publishes journals, books, articles and monographs on the latest findings within academic research. The content is often written by researchers and academics within a specific area of research – such as historians, doctors and scientists – and it is normally peer reviewed by fellow scholars of the same topic.

There is a lot of crossover between Academic Publishing and STM (Science, Technical, Medical) but we categorise them into two separate sectors at Atwood Tate.

Suitability within Academic Publishing

Many fields within academia have their own publications in which to publish their findings. These are the societies and publishers for which you would be applying to work for.

As such a degree, PhD, or a background within non-fiction publishing, or an evidential interest in a topic of academia, is preferable to many employers within academic publishing. Some more so than others. It often depends on the specifics of a role.

For an entry-level role in Academic publishing we recommend you gain as much as admin experience as possible. With regards to sales, design, marketing and other roles within publishing, a clear interest in academic publishing can be enough to be considered for a role. Also, if you have experience working within the higher education sector in some way this can also be useful. It shows a developed insight into the academic market and customers.

The skills and academic background required is dependent on the publisher in question.

If we have a role within academic publishing which you are interested in but are unsure of the qualifications required, feel free to ask us for clarification. We will be able to let you know what is required and discuss the role further.

What type of Publishers are Academic Publishers:

There are many different types of academic publishers. Here are some examples of the companies we’ve worked with before.

Many University establishments have their own academic presses, such as:

  • Oxford University Press
  • Manchester University Press
  • Cambridge University Press

But there are also societies and specific academic publishers, such as:

  • The Biochemical Society
  • Elsevier
  • Taylor & Francis
  • Springer

These are just some of many Academic Publishers in the UK, some of which have positions internationally as well.

Due to the exciting nature of the published content within academic publishing, this is a great sector in which to have a career. You can work on the latest research and publish exciting findings across many different topics. You can also work in an industry which is very often ahead of other publishing sectors, in terms of publishing innovations such as digital publishing, online platforms etc. It is as intellectually challenging as it is creative.

Interested in a role in Academic Publishing? Want to know more about the sector? Get in touch:

And make sure you check out the Twitter Feed and official website for #AcBookWeek.

Let us know what you would like to learn about next on our blog on our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Counter Offers in the Publishing Industry

Counter Offers

Counter offers

In today’s candidate driven publishing jobs market, good candidates will sometimes be spoilt for choice. We are increasingly seeing counter offers made by companies who are reluctant to lose talented staff to competitors or other sectors. Although it’s a flattering position to be in, making a decision can be very tricky, especially as you’ll usually be given only a short space of time to weigh up your options. Some people do end up making the wrong decision and return to job hunting after a few months, so we want to help you avoid that!

If you do find yourself considering a counter offer, here are some things to think about:

  • What were your reasons for applying for a new job in the first place? Does your current employer not offer the progression you want? Or are there problems with the company itself? Will any issues resolve themselves in time or still be there in a few months?
  • Will this new role offer you increased responsibility and duties which will be more rewarding than what your current employer is offering? Maybe the role works with a more exciting product or offers line management or international travel which you’ve always wanted to do.
  • Counter offers often take the form of a salary increase but if your current employer has promised you increased responsibility or perks of some kind, you should question if it is realistic that these will materialise. We’ve seen cases where they haven’t so it’s advisable to get any changes to your job agreed in writing before you agree to stay on.
  • If your prospective new employer cannot meet the salary your current employer has counter offered, it’s worth asking about future career progression and when you will be eligible for a salary review and/or bonus. It might be within a few months or after your probation period.
  • It’s also worth enquiring about benefits. Some employers offer very generous benefit packages and the perks they offer can be the equivalent of a few thousand pounds a year.

We hope these tips help. And do remember that one of the advantages of applying for jobs through a recruitment agency such as Atwood Tate is that we act as your representative and can negotiate offers on your behalf. So, if you’ve applied for a job through us and need advice about what to do or have questions you wouldn’t feel comfortable asking a prospective employer yourself, then we’re here to help.

If you have any questions, further tips or experiences you’d like to share with us, contact us via TwitterFacebook, LinkedIn or Instagram.

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PPA Business Class: The Tech and Data One

ppa-business-class-tech-and-data

You may remember that on the 21st October we attended the PPA Marketing Conference; well on the 18th November we will be attending the Tech and Data One!

For more information about the event click here!

Here’s a brief summary of the sessions you can attend on the day:

Sessions:

The Panel: Systems, Big Data And Making the Money
As a senior tech executive, how do you drive strategy and help business grow? What are the partnerships you can seek to create, and are there particular skill sets you can hire to help meet your objectives?

  • Creative Advertiser partnerships
  • Strategies for data-focused technologies
  • Investing in specialised staff and skills

Other sessions at the event include topics on:

  • Data
  • Compliance and Legality
  • Transformational Publishing
  • Suppliers: The Inside Track

Speakers Include:

Chris Fosberry, CTO, Argus Media
Mark Brincat, CTO, The Economist Group
Mike Fraser, CTO, Wilmington plc
Jonny Kaldor, CO-Found, Kaldor Group
Sean Hayes, Group Head of Data, Incisive Media
Duncan Smith, Director, iCompli
Lee Atkinson, AWS Enterprise Solutions Architect

We’re happy to be an official sponsor for this event, as we were for the last which you can read about here!

Two of our consultants, David Martin and Kellie Miller,  will be attending the event! David handles all of our IT and Data roles whilst Kellie is the Temps team manager. Please feel free to contact them via their emails, which can be found here, or via LinkedIn to request a meeting or to get in touch on the day.

Let us know if you’re attending the event on Twitter, Facebook and don’t forget to share any photos on Instagram!

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Talking about the job market – at Women in Publishing (part 2)

Moving about in Publishing

Transferring your skills to another industry or sector can be tricky but think about networking to make contacts and hear about opportunities:

Organisations like WIP, Byte The Book, Book Machine, OPuS, SYP, The Galley Club all offer regular networking opportunities where you’ll be able to chat to others currently working in publishing in a friendly informal setting. The more people you meet related to the industry the more chance you have of being remembered and recommended.

Attend seminars, workshops and social events where publishing people are likely to be – Oxford and London in particular have a host of literary events, and you never know who you will run into!  Keep up to date with industry news – read the Bookseller, BookBrunch etc and follow the media, visit bookshops.

 

Moving sector

We’re often asked how to make the move from professional/academic/educational publishing into trade.  For many, trade publishing is still their ultimate goal, even though they have secured their first couple of jobs in other publishing sectors.  This is always a difficult one for us, or any recruitment agency, as companies come to us to get the person with the most relevant experience for their vacancy – it is our job to submit the best candidates.

Also, it is incredibly competitive to get into trade publishing.  At entry level the competition is very strong – most applicants having done a publishing BA or MA degree and supporting that with internships at various trade publishing houses.  So, for every job in trade publishing further up the career ladder there are plenty of Editorial Assistants and Assistant Editors, Production or Marketing Assistants already working in trade publishing ready to take them on.  It doesn’t get easier to get into the more experience you have!

However, nothing is impossible and this is the advice that we usually give to our candidates.

Try and do it sooner rather than later, within a year/18 months – otherwise you will become pigeon holed and will start getting used to the salary you are on.

There are a few questions you need to consider when you are applying for opportunities in a different publishing sector, think about:

Are you applying for jobs at the same level as you are now?

Are you looking for a step up?

Are you open to taking a drop in salary to make this move?

Even jobs at the same level as you are now on may well pay less money.

Professional publishing, for example, is always better paid than some other market sectors – particularly trade.  Unfortunately when making a jump across to another sector of publishing there is always the consideration of taking a drop in salary if you can’t offer a track record in that sector.

Think about how best to highlight your transferable skills. With regard to marketing, you may only have marketed to academics, but consider the principles of the marketing you undertook, the aims and objectives of that marketing with regards to who you wanted to reach, and how the results of campaigns were used or helped generate revenue. Some of what you have done may have some resonance with the person reading your CV, despite not being in the same market. The key thing is to make the person reading your CV look at your skills and your knowledge and commercial understanding of your current role and not be distracted by the content you have worked on.

 

Moving job roles

If you’re looking to move from Marketing for example into Editorial, try to gain as much relevant experience in your current role that’s related to the new ideal role i.e. do as much copywriting as you can, liaise with editorial teams and research the products that they are working on.

Look at your CV.  Make sure that anywhere there is a similarity between the skills used in your current job and the required skills of the job advertised, it is spelled out to the reader.

Within any job type, whether you are in editorial, production or marketing for example, try focussing on the processes of your job rather than the titles that you work on.

As a finishing touch add a profile paragraph at the top pointing out all these elements so your transferrable skills are the first thing that strikes the recruiting manager.

 

Moving up

It is the norm today that most move on every 2 -3 years, especially early on in your career – jobs are no longer for life.  You need to identify what skills you don’t yet have that are required for the next step up.  Some companies offer structured training programmes but some don’t so you’ll need to identify training options for yourself.

Speak to your manager or HR department about identifying the skills shortages and gaining the experience required or undertaking internal or external training that will give you the skills required.

Reading job ads and job descriptions is another way of seeing what skills are needed for that next role as well as speaking to us.

It’s sometimes a case of being in the right place at the right time so do keep an eye out on internal adverts and sign up for job alerts so you don’t miss things.

 

Read Part 1 here.

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