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Industry Spotlight: STM Publishing

Welcome to Atwood Tate’s industry spotlight series, where we go behind the scenes of each of our recruitment desks to give you the scoop on working with Atwood Tate. This week Clare returns, focusing on roles in STM publishingSTM word cloud

 

What does ‘STM’ means in publishing?

STM publishing refers to scholarly, Scientific, Technical, Medical and professional publishers.  In Atwood Tate, we work with a wide range of publishers from academic and scientific publishers, learned societies, open-access publishers and professional bodies to reach out to publishing professionals.  The content is often journals or books based, for journals, there are open-access journals and subscription journals.

What will be the academic requirement?

The majority of roles we work on require a scientific degree.  It is not often that a Master’s or PhD is required but for senior editorial positions, especially working on a particular scientific subject, it is likely that a specific academic background will be needed. However, for roles that are more operational or with a strategic focus, companies might be more flexible on educational background.  Some candidates have, for example, an English degree who now work in a managerial STM publishing role so never say never!

What roles do we work on within STM publishing?

We work on roles from junior to senior level.  From Editorial or Publication Assistant, to middleweight Production Editor or Commissioning Editor; senior level Managing Editor or Publishing Operations Manager and so on.  STM publishing is a big area and it is full of potential to transfer your expertise.

Is there good progression in STM Publishing?

STM publishing is fast growing and blooming quickly so there will definitely be good progression.  Through working with different portfolio of journals and academia, you will grow your network and gain a wider knowledge of STM publishing.  Currently, a lot of STM publishers are expanding and restructuring so there are definitely opportunities to grow your career in the field.

If you are looking for a job in STM Publishing, get in touch with Clare at clarechan@atwoodtate.co.uk.

Atwood Tate is a member of ALPSP (The Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers).

Keep an eye out for ScholarlySocial @ScholarlySocial which has networking meetings.

 

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SYP Panel Help Aspiring Publishers to Kick-Start Their Career

In September, SYP London kindly hosted ‘Kick-Start Your Career: How to Succeed with your Job Search this Autumn’ for aspiring and entry level publishing candidates hoping to gain some career and work experience from established members of the industry. Speakers included our very own Associate Director Helen Speedy, who all brought their experiences and insights on how to build a successful career in publishing.

Did you miss the event? Perhaps you would like a recap! Helen Speedy shares her publishing career advice and experiences.

Explain your role and how you got there (approx. 5 mins each).

I am the Associate Director at Atwood Tate, a specialist publishing recruitment company based in Central London and Oxford. My job is to manage the Permanent team day-to day, who consist of seven consultants and an administrator, and make sure everybody is hitting their targets, having smooth relations with both clients and candidates and generally feeling happy. I am also the contact for senior publishing roles across the country, so a day can be talking through pipelines and business development with my team, or taking briefs from clients and sourcing appropriate candidates for the recruitment process.

I got my first job through talking to one of the speakers at the Oxford Brookes Careers Day towards the end of my MA, who gave me the contact details of someone looking for an Office Junior.

How do I get my first job in publishing?

There are a number of ways to get your first publishing job, and it’s worth trying a few to give yourself the best possible chance.

  • MA (plus work experience and networking)
  • Work experience placements that could lead to your first job
  • Through an agency – temping can lead to perm or to getting that work experience you needed but being paid properly along the way (also perm)
  • Networking events are a great way to build up your contacts and make a good impression before you’ve even made an application!
  • Proactive volunteering/personal work are also worth considering to boost your CV and stand out from the crowd. It is a lot easier to prove your interest in children’s illustrated fiction if your social media, blogging or volunteering backs you up!

What advice would you give your younger self, when you were just starting out?

Be more confident and don’t always assume that there are people better qualified than you.

What do you regret doing in your career?

I don’t have any regrets really. That may sound a bit complacent, but I have the philosophy that you make the right decision at the time and there is no point looking back. There are various points in my career when I could have taken a different path and I have turned down jobs and also taken roles that didn’t quite turn out to be what I thought. I remind myself that I made those decisions and they felt like the right choice at the time.  As long as you feel in control  and you are happy with your decision at that time, you should not have any regrets.  The only lasting regret I have is not calling out a bully, but I was young and in the junior position, so I forgive myself and it has given me the strength to help others confront difficult situations and not be scared to do so myself.

Associate Director Helen Speedy (second from left) after speaking on the panel

What’s the best career advice you’ve heard?

  • In terms of CV advice, make sure it shows the difference you made and the impact you’ve had, not just a list of your duties
  • If you’ve got lots of voluntary experience, internships and temp roles, try categorising rather than listing chronologically – tell a story and make sure the facts support the narrative.

How do you know if you should go for a role or not?

  • Can you tick 70-80% of the boxes (usually nobody has it all!)
  • Is it located in a sensible place for you to commute to?
  • Does picturing yourself in the role make you feel excited?
  • Do you think it would give you opportunities to learn?
  • What do you know about the company culture and how that would suit you?
  • If you’re not sure, try to have a conversation (with recruiter or name on advert)

Is it off-putting for employers if you apply for lots of different positions at the same company?

It depends on the size of company. It can be off-putting if it looks you are applying for anything and there is no real effort on any of the applications.  HR will begin to wonder how can  you be truly that interested in so many different roles with different skillsets! If there are different roles that catch your eye, find out if they will refer you if their role isn’t suitable. In a small company,you may get referred internally (I did for my first job and ended up with a better job than the one I applied for!)

Want to hear more about the SYP?

The Society of Young Publishers is a membership body for aspiring publishers and current candidates in the first ten years of their career. With branches in London, Oxford, South-West, North, Ireland and Scotland; the SYP is the biggest membership organisation in the publishing industry. For more details and to sign up, go to https://thesyp.org.uk/membership-signup.

 

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Industry Spotlight: Marketing and Publicity

Welcome to Atwood Tate’s industry spotlight series, where we go behind the scenes of each of our recruitment desks to give you the scoop on working with Atwood Tate. This week, Olivia returns, focusing on Marketing and Publicity roles.

marketing strategy image

Marketing

What do Marketers in publishing do?

Marketers are responsible for promoting a publisher’s products or services to their target audience, whether that be to individual consumers (B2C) or other businesses (B2B). Marketing can broadly be split into traditional (e.g. print advertisements, newsletters, flyers, brochures) and digital (e.g. social media, email, websites, paid search, SEO). The majority of marketing roles in publishing combine the two or are digital focused, so it’s advisable to keep your digital skills up to date.

Marketers have many different channels and techniques at their disposal and roles will vary depending on the nature of the product or service and target audience. For example, if you are marketing books to teachers you are likely to produce a lot of visually appealing marketing collateral and do a lot of direct mail campaigns. On the other hand, if you are marketing a medical journal to doctors you will likely target them with intellectually stimulating email campaigns.

Do you need a marketing qualification to work in marketing?

Absolutely not. It’s something employers might find desirable but a lot of people start out in an entry level role and build up from there. Some people choose a qualification once they’ve built up some experience and decided on an area to specialise in. The Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM) and Institute of Direct and Digital Marketing (IDM) both provide qualifications which can be studied for alongside a full-time job. Your employer may even cover the cost of the course.

Where can a marketing job take me?

Marketing is great in that the skills and knowledge you develop are very transferable and will be useful for so many employers and different industries. There are a wealth of marketing roles in publishing. Some people choose to stay in one area of publishing for most of their career while others move around different sectors, which is possible to do, especially if you have particular skills or a specialism which is in high demand.

As there are so many marketing roles there are lots of opportunities for career progression and chances to move into management positions or very specialised roles.

publicist author interview

Publicity/PR

What do Publicists in publishing do?

Publicists are responsible for managing relationships with authors and dealing with their agents. Their job is to secure press coverage for books in the print, broadcast and online media so they are expected to build strong press relationships. They are also responsible for organising and attending events with authors, such as book launches and signings, interviews, author tours and appearances at literary festivals. Publicists need to stay informed about new trends and developments in their area of publishing and they often attend editorial meetings and contribute to pitches for new acquisitions.

Is PR all about parties and schmoozing with authors?

Yes, you might get the chance to work with high-profile and celebrity authors. You may also work with new and debut authors, which can be just as exciting and rewarding. Regardless of author list, there’s a lot of hard work and relationship building which goes into making any campaign successful.

Do you need a big network of media contacts?

Initially no. In junior roles you will be assisting PR Managers with their campaigns and general admin. As time goes on, you will start to build up a network of contacts. If you are working on particular titles, this may become quite specialised. For example, if you’re working with cookery authors, you will build up contacts with cookery magazines and food bloggers.

What skills do you need to succeed in marketing and publicity?

Marketing and publicity roles are closely linked and require similar skill sets. Anyone who wants to succeed in one of these roles needs superb communication and relationship building skills. They are busy jobs so excellent organisation skills are also essential. Creativity is also important. Some publishers work with small budgets, so you have to be innovative and resourceful to come up with new and inventive ideas. Keeping up to date with trends in the market is also key.

Marketers in particular often need to have strong copywriting skills and a good eye for detail. Photoshop and InDesign experience is a plus, especially if working in a collateral heavy role. Software skills are important as there are marketing programs you will be expected to use, such as CRM, email, social media, marketing automation software and analytics tools. There are a wealth of programs which do different things so it’s good if you can pick them up quickly. Video and audio content creation skills are increasingly desired in publishing, especially when working with online products.

If you are looking for a job in Marketing or Publicity, get in touch with Olivia at Olivia@atwoodtate.co.uk.

 

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B2B Job Focus: Sub-Editors

In a previous post, we described different career paths available to B2B reporters. In this article, we explore the significant part played by sub-editors/copy-editors in the editing process!

Sub-editors / Copy-editors

Sub-editors who work for newspapers and magazines are often called copy-editors (or subs). Their role is to process the copy that will appear in their publication. They must ensure that it is accurate, free of mistakes, makes sense and reads well.

Sub-editors often sit in/next to the production team. They do not write articles, but they edit the work of others to “house-style” and adhere to word counts. They also write headlines, standfirsts, captions and summaries. Their duties may include laying out pages too.

Typical tasks

  • correcting spelling or grammar/typographical errors
  • writing headlines, abstracts and captions
  • checking the article’s accuracy and spotting potential legal problems
  • cutting or editing copy to fit on the page
  • liaising with reporters and editors
  • laying out pages

Sub-editors need to be meticulous and ready to edit heavily if necessary. They are more often than not the crafty hands turning articles into compelling stories. They need to be very organised and able to work to tight deadlines.

Many sub-editors trained as journalists before moving on to this position. Unfortunately a lot of publishers outsourced their sub-editing/production function in the last decade and journalists and editors often have to fill in for sub-editors as they don’t have the in-house staff required. And the line is sometimes very thin between these positions.

Career Path

The National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ), the National Union of Journalists (NUJ), the Society of Editors and the Publishing Training Centre offer preliminary accredited qualifications or copy-editing courses by distance learning. Graduates with relevant qualifications, such as a degree in English, media or publishing are also considered. The career path for a sub-editor includes being promoted to senior and potentially chief sub-editor or production editor. Their main role is to supervise a team of sub-editors and oversee the whole production process, making sure the magazine is delivered on time and to schedule.

Next week, we will be entering the fascinating world of Market Reporters!

Is our career advice helping you in your job search? Do let us know via our social media channels!

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B2B Job Focus: Deputy Editors/Editors

Are you a section editor who wants to climb up the career ladder? Today we’ll introduce you to Deputy Editors & Editors!

Deputy Editors/Editors

Deputy Editors are second-in-command within the publication. When the Editor is away, the deputy Editor deputises for them.

Depending on the publication’s size and structure, the role of the Deputy Editor may vary: you can have the same duties as a section Editor’s or assist Editors with their workload. Deputy Editors are usually less involved in hands-on writing and focus more on editing the work of other journalists, assisting the Editor with workflow management and mentoring/managing more junior members of staff. On top of solid writing skills, you will need excellent communication and organisation skills.

Here is a summary of what the role typically involves:

  • Edit and proofread the work of writers
  • Manage and assign articles (and sometimes write them)
  • Oversee the publication’s content to maintain quality and accuracy
  • Organise copy editing and production processes
  • Mentor or manage junior members of the team

Some publications may use the job title Assistant Editor instead, while other companies both have a deputy Editor and an assistant Editor. Assistant Editors’ main duty is to support the Editor, sometimes by performing a similar role as a section Editor. It’s confusing, we know!

Most deputy Editors have a solid background as a Reporter/Senior Reporter with a keen interest in the editing process. A degree in journalism or in a subject related to the publication (for example, a law degree to work for a law publication) can also be an asset. The next step for a deputy Editor is to become Editor!

Editors

Editors are responsible for the publication’s smooth delivery and more importantly for its Editorial strategy and commercial success. They need to ensure that the content published is accurate and compelling as well as meeting the audience’s needs. Editors act as the face of the publication, and as a result they may be required to attend events and conferences related to their industry. They need to be commercially aware and keeping up-to-date with market trends. They might also be involved in the launch or development of events associated to their publication as events now represent a large part of some publishers’ revenues.

Editors are expected to:

  • Plan, coordinate and revise content for publication
  • Manage Editorial workflow and monitor the printing process to ensure deadlines are met
  • Establish and monitor budgets
  • Be aware of market trends and identify new opportunities for new products
  • Review story ideas and suggest new ones
  • Act as the main point of contact between Editorial team and other departments
  • Work with sales and marketing teams to raise brand awareness
  • Work with events team to develop/launch new events or provide events content
  • Attend industry events and chair panels
  • Manage and develop Editorial team, recruiting staff and conducting appraisals

Editors’ responsibilities can be very broad especially if you are working on a small publication. Editors work closely with the sales, marketing and production teams as well as writers to produce a quality publication.

As we mentioned before, job titles vary enormously from a company to another. A step up from Editor would be Managing Editor and/or Editor-in-Chief.

Extensive experience is usually necessary to become an Editor, as we explained in our previous articles on B2B journalism and Section Editors. So if you are an ambitious graduate, you’ll have to get some relevant experience before applying for such a position!

Is our career advice helping you in your job search? Do let us know via our social media channels!

 

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B2B Job Focus: Digital / Online / Web Editor

Are you a journalist or a section editor who wants to climb up the career ladder? In a previous post, Atwood Tate introduced you to the world of Section Editors. Today we’ll focus on Digital/Online/Web Editors!

Digital / Online / Web Editor

Web editor positions (also known as Digital or Online editors) developed as online publishing was spreading across publishing. It is now a rare thing for a publication to have a print version only but not so peculiar to have digital only titles! Web editors are responsible for creating content tailored for online publication. This includes a wide range of material from text to videos and podcasts. Web editors create and develop editorial guidelines to attract and increase online audience.

Web editors’ responsibilities include:

  • producing appealing content for the publication’s website, app, etc.
  • liaising with in-house team members and clients to adapt digital content
  • ensuring that search engine optimisation (SEO) is effective
  • overseeing the online publication’s layout (text, images, videos…)
  • developing and monitoring online communities
  • monitoring online messages boards and social media

 

Web editors act as the main point of contact with technical staff. They need to collaborate with several professionals (web developers, writers, photographers, web designers, the marketing team…) to enhance the website’s visibility. They also monitor online traffic to measure popularity and find new ways to make content attractive.

Required Skills

Not surprisingly, web editors should have strong IT skills. An excellent knowledge of desktop publishing and photo imaging packages like Photoshop and InDesign is necessary to work as a web editor. They must also be familiar with SEO and content management systems. They still need to have strong editorial skills though as this is ultimately an editorial position! And employers value creative candidates who can anticipate the next trade or burning topic within their industry.

Career Background

There is no particular route to become a web editor although a strong body of experience is often required. Many web editors have worked as journalists, and have solid knowledge of online publishing. Some digital editors move into editorial team management, but once again the career paths for this role are pretty flexible. With the boom of online publishing, many companies hired web editors and new graduates are all expected to be familiar with online publishing. It seems that this function is nowadays more and more engrained in Editor roles as onlube publishing has become inevitable and it is probable that this specific function will merge totally in an Editor role.

You can find relevant Digital/Online/Web Editor jobs here: www.atwoodtate.co.uk

Inspired by the different careers in B2B publishing and thinking about new opportunities? We are running a contest to receive a personalised CV surgery session with Karine, our Lead B2B Consultant, to make sure you are the best applicant you can be! Apply here between midnight 20th August and 11.59pm 2nd September to secure your chance!

 

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B2B Job Focus: Section Editors

Thinking of a career in B2B journalism? Atwood Tate is here to help! In a previous post we introduced you to the wonderful world of B2B publishing. Let’s continue our closer look at the different editorial career paths of B2B publishing with Section Editors!

Section Editors

 

Becoming a section editor is one of the career paths available to reporters/senior reporters interested in editing or getting some managerial experience. Section Editors can focus on a particular type of content like news or features. They could also specialise in a particular topic such as fashion, games or technology.

Section editors are responsible for overseeing the content of their part of the publication. They commission articles for their sections and work independently with their team of journalists (if the publication is big enough for them to have a team). They ensure that their section is of quality, up-to-date with the industry’s latest developments, and informative.

The duties associated with this role include:

  • scheduling content for their section of the magazine/website commissioning/writing articles
  • supervising freelance writers to ensure they hit deadlines and potentially managing in-house reporters.
  • editing, proofreading and subbing copy

Section editors may write some content for the publication but their main duty is to supervise writers and guarantee that deadlines and quality standards are met.

Our clients expect candidates to have solid experience as senior reporters to apply for a section editor position. They are looking for reporters with good proofreading and subbing skills as well as the ability to manage a team and to plan content for the section of the magazine.

The natural progression for section editors is to move on to a deputy editor position and then an editor role. No specific qualification is required to become a section editor but a journalism degree can be a bonus as previously stated in our Reporter focus.

Next week, we will be looking at the typical job description and career path for a Digital/Online/Web Editor position!

Is our career advice helping you in your job search? Do let us know via our social media channels!

Inspired by the different careers in B2B publishing and thinking about new opportunities? We are running a contest to receive a personalised CV surgery session with Karine, our Lead B2B Consultant, to make sure you are the best applicant you can be! Apply here between midnight 20th August and 11.59pm 2nd September to secure your chance!

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B2B Job Focus: Reporters

Thinking of a career in B2B journalism? Atwood Tate is here to help! In a previous post we introduced you to the wonderful world of B2B publishing. Let’s now take a closer look at the different editorial career paths of B2B publishing, starting with Reporters!

Reporter/Journalists 

B2B Reporters/Journalists source and write news and features articles for a variety of formats, from print and online magazines to newspapers and broadcast (TV and radio).

B2B journalists investigate and report the latest news within a specific market. In this capacity, reporters may be required to travel nationally and/or internationally to cover industry events. Typical duties include:

  • Sourcing and writing news stories/features/opinion pieces about a specific market
  • Researching and interviewing key industry contacts to deliver accurate content
  • covering conferences and reporting on industry events
  • building strong contacts within the industry and developing an expertise of the market covered

B2B publications cover a wide range of subjects: from mechanical engineering to cabinet-making, energy to nursing, there is a publication for every trade!

Our clients are open to journalists without prior B2B experience for entry level positions. For roles requiring previous experience, a B2B background is desirable as writing for business audiences requires a different approach to consumer journalism. Some of our clients also value experience working for a local newspaper as local reporters often have strong investigation skills. Employers are looking for journalists with good research skills and the ability to pick up a subject quickly. You don’t have to know all about civil engineering to work for a civil engineering magazine, but you do need to be able to get to grips with the subject quite quickly. For more senior positions, our clients might ask for previous experience in a specific sector. This is particularly true with complex sectors such as finance or law.

Career paths vary according to what reporters are interested in. The natural progression for news-driven journalists would be from reporter to senior reporter and possibly section editor (news editor or features editor) positions if editing is something of interest. They can also choose to become assistant editors before moving on to a deputy editor and later editor positions, while those who prefer focusing on editing and copy-editing can become sub-editors. There is a thin line between all of these roles and your choice to follow one path or another will depend on your skills and preferences. Job titles can also mean different things in different companies (It’s confusing, we know!) Always read job adverts and job descriptions carefully before applying to try and understand what the role really entails. Or speak to your recruiter!

Is a formal qualification really necessary to become a journalist, I hear you ask? It isn’t an absolute requirement and some of our clients are quite happy with equivalent experience. A course might help craft your skills and teach you the basics of what makes a good reporter. If you can, we would recommend doing a course/training or gaining some relevant experience like internships before applying for a first job. The National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ) offers accredited courses and many universities have journalism degrees.

We hope this helps! Watch this space as we will continue the series next week, where our next post will be on section editors!

Inspired by the different careers in B2B publishing and thinking about new opportunities? We are running a contest to receive a personalised CV surgery session with Karine, our Lead B2B Consultant, to make sure you are the best applicant you can be! Apply here between midnight 20th August and 11.59pm 2nd September to secure your chance!

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What is GDPR? A guide for our candidates…

The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a new EU regulation that will come into force on 25 May 2018. It will strengthen the current rules under the Data Protection Act (1998) by introducing new obligations for organisations and rights for individuals.

The GDPR will apply to businesses that are outside of the EU but continue to provide services to individuals from EU Member States, so will be applicable even after Brexit.

How does it affect you?

You’ve probably received a *delete as appropriate: large/enormous/mailbox breaking number of emails from companies alerting you to opt in to keep receiving emails and probably like me, you’ve followed up on a few and left quite a lot unanswered for them to assume you’re no longer interested and happy to be deleted.

As a company working with people and handling their data, we understand it’s vital to protect the privacy of data for our candidates, clients and everyone we’re working with across the recruitment process.

We’ve been making changes to the way we process your data and how long we keep it for and will be contacting our candidates to make sure we’re only holding data you’re happy for us to. You will be able to login at any time and update your preferences or change your consent options.

We’re updating many of our Policies, Contract and Forms to ensure we’re fully compliant. You can find our Privacy Policy here.

We’re members of the REC (Recruitment and Employment Confederation) and they’ve produced a great Infographic for jobseekers –  know your data protection rights.

Any questions, get in touch with Claire Law, Managing Director Atwood Tate’s Data Protection Officer (DPO) at clairelaw@atwoodtate.co.uk

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5 Great Reasons to Work in Academic Publishing

Today marks the end of Academic Book Week 2018 (#AcBookWeek), which is ‘a week-long celebration of the diversity, variety and influence of academic books aiming to open up a dialogue between the makers, providers and readers of academic books.’

Academic publishers produce and sell scholarly journals, books, eBooks, text books and reference works for researchers, students and academic libraries. We work with a lot of academic publishers on a variety of roles, from Editors to Marketing gurus to Production Controllers to Salespeople, in permanent, temporary and freelance positions. It’s an exciting and rewarding industry to be in, and here’s why:

  1. You work on cutting-edge research from top academics. The articles and books you publish will help teach new generations of students, and may even revolutionise the field. You could even publish work on sociology and politics which helps to shape public policy. If you’re looking for a rewarding career that makes a difference, academic publishing could be for you.
  2. Use your strong academic background in a related field. Your humanities or arts degree or postgraduate degree will be invaluable in an editorial role in academic publishing, so you can continue working on the subjects you love. (N.b. you do NOT need a PhD to work in academic publishing, but it is an advantage in some areas. A keen interest in the subject area is essential.)
  3. In a world of fake news and the devaluation of experts, be part of an industry which values intellectual rigour and research integrity through peer review processes.
  4. Be at the centre of exciting debates and advances in the industry. Join the debate on Open-Access or be at the forefront of technological advances in academic materials and e-learning. If you’re into tech and finding new ways of engaging digitally-savvy audiences, academic publishing is an exciting place to be.
  5. While it’s not all about the money, the salaries are often higher in academic publishing than in other sectors like trade.

So what’s your favourite thing about working in academic publishing?

For more information about what academic publishing is and how you can get into it, see our blog posts here and here.

To see our current academic vacancies, click here.

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