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Our Plans for the London Book Fair & Giveaway

Plans for London Book Fair & Giveaway

Our Plans for the London Book Fair & Giveaway

With the London Book Fair officially one week away we thought we would share with you our plans for the event!

Every day of the fair there will be at least 5 members of the Atwood Tate staff milling around Olympia, either at our stand, in the Ivy Club or around the fair.

When we are at our stand (3B26, in tech) and we’re not deep in conversation , feel free to approach us. During the week we do have meetings throughout the day so we may not always be available to chat – as much as we’d like to!

You can still take a look at our stand however! We will be bringing a lot of things with us:

  • Leaflets – with all our information and details about our services
  • Printables – Are you looking for work experience? Or useful information about getting into publishing? We will have some print outs available with some resources for you!
  • Sweets – One of the most important things at any book fair: sugary sustenance.
  • Current Vacancies – We’ll have a list of all of our current vacancies at our stand as well.

We will also be on social media a lot! Not only during the London Book Fair but this week as well!

Competitions

This year we are also running competitions! The first is a Giveaway: Win £100 worth of vouchers by liking and sharing our LinkedIn page! Starting from tomorrow (8th March) and ending on the 16th of March, the last day of the London Book Fair, you could win a great prize! And all you have to do is follow our LinkedIn page and share the post on Twitter. For more entries you can also share and like our LinkedIn posts on this Giveaway!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Also, if you follow us on Twitter you may have noticed a certain competition we’re starting for this year’s Book Fair!

The first person to come up to us, on each day of the London Book Fair, and says: ‘Atwood Tate we hear you’re great’ will win a £10 book voucher!

The earlier you get to our stand (3B26) and say this, the better. We’ll announce when someone has won the prize each day on our Twitter feed. However please respect the consultants work; if they’re in a meeting at the stand please don’t disturb them. The fair is an industry event after all.

Other Plans

On Tuesday 14th you may spot our Administrator Ellie wandering around with a camera as she films a London Book Fair Vlog for our YouTube channel! Be sure to say hello and tell us your thoughts on the London Book Fair if you get a chance!

On Thursday 16th, between 2:30pm-5:00pm, two of our Consultants: Karine Nicpon & Alison Redfearn will be attending the Career’s Clinic. You can bring your CV and have a quick 5 minute chat with them about the next step in your career!

All in all we have a lot going on!

Make sure you follow us across all our social media, and use the hashtag #LBF17, to keep up to date with what is happening at the Fair. As well as receive advice, hints and tips on what to bring and see at the London Book Fair: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

We can’t wait to meet you all!

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Rave Technologies – Annual Publishing Conference 2016

Rave Technologies - Annual Publishing Conference 2016

On the 8th of November,  Karine and David, attended the Annual Publishing Conference 2016, hosted by Rave Technologies. David attended the morning and Karine the afternoon.

Speakers: Annual Publishing Conference

The Next 15 Years

David’s talk, amongst other things, was an interesting insight into the future of technologies and how this could benefit us or possibly hinder us.

He spoke about why some companies had failed in the last 15 years as they had not kept a breast with up to date technologies and why some had not because they had done! And the pattern would continue for the next 15 years if we all don’t get on board the rapid moving technological landscape.

Another point he raised is information/cyber security both in publishing (how there needs to be more awareness of it) and in our everyday life as the number of gadgets we use increase.

Implementing a Content Enrichment – The easy way, or the right way

Jason, Director, Platform Capabilities at Wiley gave guidance on how to implement a content enrichment strategy. The idea is to enrich digital content as to make it more valuable to the publisher.

This could include related article services to grouping together content so that it can be used for multiple purposes such as SEO and TDM services.

Going beyond Content is the Secret to your Success

Paul spoke about how to really know your customers through the enhancement of data and, by doing this, knowing what products your customers want (and will ultimately purchase!).

In a nutshell, this is done by analysing the digital footprint of your customer; what their purchase history looks like, their demographic etc. (the list is endless, these are just two examples), you then can tailor products, services and campaigns to they want.

What happens when you involve users in developing your products?

Sharon Cooper, Chief Digital Officer for the BMJ, gave an interesting talk on how their digital products need to be designed in line with user needs. But how do they know their individual user needs? What could be a good function for one may not be good for another.

Well, the conclusion to this, is to involve the actual users on their specific needs across the whole spectrum of the medical industry from student to GP and management. They are then able to get an idea of the requirements and build in the functionalities for the relevant level.

Secondly, hold a Design Sprint, where you take 5 people from different sectors of the business (sales, technology etc.) and take 5 days out to road map the product as follows:

Day 1: UNPACK

Share knowledge, common understanding of the design challenge and define metrics.

Day2: SKETCH

Generate ideas and variations, critique and weighted voting.

Day 3: DECIDE

Conflicts and assumptions, storyboard and plan prototype.

Day 4: PROTOTYPE

Build a realistic version of the storyboard.

Day 5: TEST

Validate with real users and determine how people understand your product.

Did you attend the Publishing Conference at Rave Technologies? If so let us know in a comment below or send us a message on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or Instagram!

 

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PPA Business Class: Marketing Conference

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The PPA has launched a new series of half day conferences specifically for senior professionals – this one on Friday 21st October is for Marketing and one in November for Tech.

See: www.ppa.co.uk/events/businessmedia2016 for more details.

Here’s a taste of what will be covered:

Shiny Happy People

Faced with an increasing array of new marketing tools and the requirement for smarter, savvier marketing to cut through the noise surrounding customers, getting the right skills has never been more important. Our panel of experts tackle the key issues:

  • Business strategist…customer insight expert…innovation leader…what is the role of a marketing director in 2016?
  • What marketing skills are needed right now?
  • How do you address the digital skills gap?

Other sessions on:

  • Subscriptions
  • ‘Community’
  • Putting The Commercial Into Content Marketing

Speakers include:

We’re pleased to be an official sponsor for both events and Olivia Constantinides from our London office and Claire Louise Kemp from our Oxford office will be attending the Marketing one, so do request a meeting or get in touch on the day.

Let us know how if you’re attending by using the PPA twitter hashtag #PPABusinessClass. Don’t forget to add @PPABusiness and us too @AtwoodTate!

 

 

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How to Keep Your Skills Relevant – The Galley Club

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Last week I was delighted to open the talk season at the Galley Club. They invited me to share my experience about changing skillset in publishing. I focussed on production skills but really we could apply the tips and advice below to any job in publishing. Here is a retranscription of what my presentation.

Before I start, let me tell you just a little bit about me: I studied Spanish and Publishing back in France and I worked in trade publishing in Paris for a few years. I was Editorial and Legal Assistant for a pocketbook publisher there. Three and a half years ago I moved to London because I wanted a life and career change. I’ve been working at Atwood Tate for three years now. At Atwood Tate we cover all kinds of roles at all levels across all publishing sectors, from academic to STM, B2B, trade or professional. For three years I’ve been working on production and production editorial roles, amongst others. So I will focus on changing skills set in publishing and more particularly in production, and will tell you how to keep your skills relevant and adapt to changing roles.

  • Context: changes in publishing and production

This is not breaking news, publishing has been through many changes over the years. Proof of that is the invasion of “metadata” and “content” in the headlines of conferences and seminars. Publishing has changed, whether it’s in STM, academic, professional or educational and of course trade as well, which had perhaps been a bit slower to adapt than many other sectors, in terms of innovation and digitisation of content. As I’m sure everyone is aware, sales of digital products, whether that be eBooks, online journals, databases or online platforms have grown considerably. And publishers developed new systems and workflows to enable their content to be published in various formats.

This obviously has affected all roles within publishing and the skills required to do those jobs. The same goes for the printing industry. In three years at Atwood Tate, I have seen a huge variety of new job titles, most including the word “digital”, but this has changed again actually, as digital is now entrenched in all that they do and it doesn’t need to always be highlighted.

In terms of production, we’ve seen a change in workflows and methodologies, with for example a move to xml first workflows. New products, formats and technologies means new systems being put in place, whether that be overhauling production workflows and peer-review processes or outsourcing the digital conversion of files to specialist suppliers. As a result we’ve noticed a demand for more project and programme managers, both on a permanent and fixed-term contract basis. Professionals need to be able to review and master workflows and processes.

Now don’t hate me, but there is also a lot of demand and opportunity for people with strong technical skills: knowledge of mark-up language such as html and xml is often required, as well as basic coding and analytics. Everybody should be comfortable reading and manipulating simple data. Because it’s all about data and metadata nowadays! And being able to deal with suppliers and control the quality of the data received. Highly technical roles are still relatively rare in publishing, because the majority of platforms and systems are being developed and built by external suppliers, but this could change, and larger publishers do already have teams of developers working on bespoke software in-house.

But there is a good news! Publishers are not just looking outside the industry for people with skills that are missing. When I joined Atwood Tate, I worked on Digital Producer or Video Producer roles and our clients were saying that they were open to hire people from outside of the industry, because they felt that existing publishing candidates lacked the experience and skills required. However I’m pleased to say that this has changed, and in the majority of cases, the online/digital aspects have been integrated into the traditional positions. Bringing new people in is good for diversity but often very techy people might not fit into the creative world of publishing. Now this brings me to my next point, how do you build up on your skills? How do you keep these relevant?

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Karine speaking at the Galley Club

  • Get to know your skills and your career options

Traditional skills are still key in publishing. The profile of production and production editorial people have not really changed. The “hard skills” used in production are still the same. Yes, you need to be able to deal with suppliers but it’s nothing a production controller is not used to be doing. You need to be a good project manager to master workflows? Well again this is a core skill of production people, organisation, time-management. You need to be able to work comfortably with data? Production professionals were always required to have a good head for numbers and a keen eye for detail. I realise I sound a bit like a job description but what I want to say is there is nothing unachievable here!

Before updating your skills though, I would advise to get to know them. Assess your experience and see what you’re good at, what you’re missing. You need to be able to identify a skill you don’t have by talking to colleagues and competitors. If you work in a very small company, maybe go to seminars to identify the latest trends in the market, talk to fellow production people. If you need advice on your options, talking to a recruiter is also a good idea. Recruiters will be able to tell you where there is a shortage of skills in the market and where you will have more opportunities. You can also have a look at some job adverts to identify the requirements of publishers.

It is important for you to be aware of your options. The days of keeping one job for life are long gone. And there are many different paths a production candidate can take, whether it’s managing a production team, or becoming a project manager. It could be working in Operations where production profiles are often required or managing relationships with suppliers. There are multiple careers available for production candidates. So ask yourself: what are you good at? What do you enjoy doing? Where do you want your career to go?

  • Keeping your skills updated

Now once you’ve identified which of your abilities and skills you would like to develop, how do you get there? How do you gain new skills and update your existing ones?

One way is obviously through training.

As I mentioned earlier, publishers do understand the importance of experience and publishing knowledge. And they are now training and reskilling people rather than bringing in new people for the sake of it. A lot of our candidates are sent on training courses or in-house workshops. There are several training organisations out there and hopefully your company will back you up. It’s worth having a look at the benefits of a publisher before accepting a new role there, to see if training is provided on a regular basis.

Publishers are making an effort to retain their staff and train them for different roles. A lot of our clients are encouraging people to move into different roles or even different departments within their organisation. It’s a massive benefit and in the long term can save on time and money. They would rather develop their employees than getting some new people on board who would require a lot more training and might not be the right fit in the end.  Some of our clients also organise shadowing days where you sit next to a colleague to try and familiarise yourself with a new way of working and new workflows. If you don’t think your employer is offering this, there is no harm in suggesting it yourself!

Attending classes and getting a professional certification can be useful too. I’m thinking of Prince 2 or Agile certification, for instance, which is sometimes required for Project Manager or Product Manager roles. And it’s always a bonus on your CV and a plus for your organisation. So again, do not hesitate to ask your line manager for training. If you can’t get backing from your company then there are free online courses like the MOOC (Massive Online Open Courses) offered by universities to help individuals to develop. Or affordable workshops and seminars you can go to. But you need to be ready to teach yourself new skills.

No matter how you chose to update your skills or what opportunities you are given, there is one thing you will always need, and it’s the right attitude.

  • The right attitude

Something that we hear HR and in-house recruiters say all the time is: you need to be adaptable. The industry changes constantly, roles don’t tend to stay the same, there are so many factors impacting your professional career, politics, economics, etc. So the one thing you need to develop is your adaptability. Be curious and resilient. Be flexible. Don’t be put off by change, embrace it! It’s not always an easy thing to do. Some people are open to change naturally and actually really like it, for some others it’s more difficult to adapt. But if you want to evolve with the industry, you have to be flexible. The pace is fast. If you can’t demonstrate your willingness to move with the times, to upskill and learn new tech, understand new business models, then you won’t keep up. Your experience and the skills you already have are gold for publishers. But you need to be eager to learn more every day.

It’s not easy for everyone. It was certainly not easy for me. When I came to London, I knew nothing about recruitment. I had worked in publishing, I knew the industry quite well, yes. But recruitment doesn’t exist in France. So when I got hired at Atwood Tate, I had everything to learn. And I was really eager. I moved to London because I had in mind that things are different in England and that transferrable sills are actually a thing. And they are! In France it’s very difficult to move to another industry, if you studied Spanish, then you can be a Spanish teacher, or live in Spain, but that’s pretty much it! In England I do really think that we have the chance to move to different roles using these so called transferrable skills.

Of course I received a lot of training at Atwood Tate. And I keep getting training every step of the way, because if the publishing industry is changing, my job is changing too. And it’s all about keeping up-to-date and adapting to the market really. When I started three years ago, we didn’t need to dig out candidates, we had plenty of applications for our roles. It’s very different now. The market is very fast-paced and we constantly need to head hunt some candidates for some roles like Junior Production Controller for example which is a level where it’s really difficult to find people. So we have had to adapt too. Claire sends us on courses and we go to seminars, we talk to our candidates, our clients, we listen and we try to evolve. Some of us took a recruitment qualification recently. I’m not a person who loves change. But I had to learn to be more flexible and to be fair, I’ve only be more successful since then. More confident as well as I have developed a lot more skills than I thought I had.

 

To sum up I would say that you need a positive attitude and an open-mind to keep on top of things. More than a skillset, it’s a mind-set. You need to take ownership of their careers and be proactive. Jobs are changing and so is the industry, but it’s really up to you to keep learning and be open to trying new things.

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ALPSP Conference 2016

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Three weeks ago Claire and I attended the annual ALPSP conference, which brings together a large number of scholarly and professional publishing professionals from across the UK and overseas. The conference was hosted over three days (14-16th September) and delegates were treated to a packed schedule of presentations, panel discussions and networking opportunities.

The key discussion points at the conference were:

  • The disruption caused by digital developments, which affect the publishing industry as a whole, and how companies can future proof their brands and products. We should let technology lead, not disrupt.
  • Metrics and the ever-expanding range available. How can Metrics be used to measure publication performance as well as other research outputs and activities. What is the future of research evaluation?
  • The evolution of peer review and its relevance today. How can peer review be used effectively in different communities, if at all. How is peer review used outside of scientific publications and what specifics should it address.
  • The data revolution and the implications this has. Publishers can’t solely be content businesses. They need to be innovative and become technology companies to stay relevant.

On the second night of the conference the ALPSP Awards were hosted. The Award for Contribution to Scholarly Publishing was given to Alice Meadows, Director of Community Engagement and Support at ORCID. Awards for Innovation were given to Cartoon Abstracts by Taylor & Francis and Wiley ChemPlanner.

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The ALPSP Winners – Image attributed to ALPSP – http://alpsp.org/ALPSP-Awards

You can download the full conference programme and view the video footage at http://www.alpsp.org/2016-Programme.

Next year’s conference is being hosted in the Netherlands. We’ll see you there!

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Careers in 21st Century Publishing

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Atwood Tate are pleased to be sponsoring the OPuS event tonight, Careers in 21st Century Publishing.

In the fast-moving world of publishing, “jobs for life” are an anomaly and transferable skills essential. But how easy is it to progress in publishing and move between market sectors and different roles? What are the key elements you need to build your career? Is it possible to succeed outside traditional publishing companies?

Focusing on their own specific work experience in moving onwards and upwards from entry level jobs, 4 speakers from a wide range of companies will give a unique insight into the diverse profession loosely referred to as “publishing”.

Confirmed speakers:
• David Spencer: Publisher, Social Sciences, Elsevier
• Emily Brand: Managing Editor, Bodleian Library Publishing
• Robbie Cooke: Marketing and PR Manager at Rebellion
Further speakers to be announced.

Drinks & Networking from 6.15pm
Presentations 7-8.30pm
Willow Buildings, Oxford Brookes University
To register, go to http://www.opusnet.co.uk/events/forthcoming-events/careers-in-publishing

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The London Digital Book Printing Forum

I recently attended an event for print and production professionals – the London Digital Book Printing Forum at The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA).

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The event give updates on the key trends and issues in the book market, looking at both  the supply chain and book manufacturing, including the status of digital printing. I made it to the afternoon session where speakers covered:

Market Evolution and Emergence of New Business Models: Some of the key players in book publishing, distribution, and manufacturing gave their insights on the changes occurring in print procurement and book distribution, and on the impact of digital printing on the streamlining of the supply chain.

Richard Fidczuk, Production Director at SAGE Publications spoke passionately about their use of digital – they publish 250 books a year and over 500 journals with most journals still being print rather than digital. They printed their first frontlist digital 4 colour title in March 2016 and most reprints are now printed digitally to reduce stock and print runs. In terms of the impact of digital on the supply chain, it means books never need to go out of print. They can also print locally in many different locations which is useful for new books with no sales history.

We also heard from Paul Major, Global Senior Procurement Manager, Oxford University Press and David Taylor, Senior Vice President, Content Acquisition International, Ingram Content Group.  All of the speakers agreed keeping stock in warehouses was much reduced nowadays due to print on demand options.

We also heard about some innovations from international publishers, the one that really caught my eye was Frédéric Mériot, Managing Director, Presses Universitaires de France (PUF) talking about sending a ‘statement of disruption’ to the market. They opened a shop in Paris to print their own list (and 3 million Google titles). It’s proved a huge success – you can go in, select a book, get a coffee and the Espresso book machine will print your book while you wait – and with a personalised message if you wish!

It was also great to hear from some smaller publishers in the ‘Medium & Small Publishers’ Points of View’ section. Their workflows and requirements are often very different to the larger publishers but all were using digital printing and POD to some degree. Michelle Jones, Production Manager, IWA Publishing said they need to be flexible and open to new technology and they often select a print process on a book by book basis based on price, quality etc.  Claire Watts, Production Manager, Oldcastle Books agreed the POD option would be good for reasons of cost and the environment. Anne Beech, Managing Director, Pluto Press said her colleagues can tell the difference between a litho and digitally printed books (but it’s less likely the readers would) and that POD is the hidden saviour of the small publisher.  Daniele Och, Production Director, Zed Books said 90% of their frontlist and all backlist titles are printed digitally and it’s essential to their business to have good digital printing options.

And lastly Jane Hyne, Production Manager, National Gallery Company gave an insight into how she has been working with digital printing to produce high quality colour books.

Overall it was a good opportunity to catch up on production and printing news, terminology and what the future might hold.

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Penguin Living – Careers 360 Immersion Day 11th September

Penguin Living, a new initiative from Penguin Random House, is launching a great series of events to promote authors and experts specialising in personal development. We’re really delighted to be involved in the very first one – the Careers 360 Immersion Day on 11th September.

The day will involve a series of talks with workshop elements from selected authors and experts – authors confirmed so far are Tim Vincent, the author of Nail That Interview, Caroline Goyder, author of Gravitas, Alice Olins and Phanella Mayall Fine, authors of Step Up – Confidence, Success and Your Stellar Career in 10 Minutes a Day, John Williams, author of Screw Work, Break Free, Bill Burnett and Dave Evans, authors of Designing your LifeBuild a Life That Works for You, and Kevin Rodgers, author of Why Aren’t They Shouting? Books will be on sale throughout the day.

The brand’s overarching aim is to “empower people to live life better” by making best use of its authors’ ideas, advice and insight.

The day, priced £15 per session or £40 for the whole day, will be divided into three segments: “Applying for Jobs”, “Improving your Career” and “Career Choices”, with PRH’s authors and experts – including Atwood Tate! – offering tips on how to give a great interview, changing careers and flexible working.

Check out the Penguin Living website, www.penguinliving.co.uk, the Twitter handle is @PenguinLivingUK and hashtag #DoItBetter.

        Tim Vincent                 Caroline Goyder                    Alice Olins                   Phanella Mayall Fine

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   Kevin Rodgers                     Dave Evans                      Bill Burnett                      John Williams       

 kevin_rodgersDave Evans110625.BruceHeimanWeddingjohn_williams2 

 

 

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Scholarly Social with FuturePub – New Developments in Scientific Collaboration Tech

I wanted to tell you about an event I went to recently that’s definitely worth looking out for. They have regular, very well organised events usually including pizza and drinks!

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Scholarly Social is a social networking group for people involved in scholarly communication (including publishers, librarians, researchers, consultants, intermediaries, and students).  They’ve linked up with FuturePub (from Overleaf) to bring us Futurepub7 – an hour of 5-minute talks themed around the future of scientific publishing.

Here’s the basic list of 7 speakers and topics but lots more detail can be found here:

  1. Reimagining scientific news: How user research led to an entire product redesign, by Sybil Wong and Mimi Keshani
  2. Publishing Research Ideas and Outcomes, by Ross Mounce
  3. Peercog: Peer-to-peer recognition from author to reviewer, by Laura Harvey
  4. Peer to Peer Science, by James Littlejohn
  5. Automating peer review for research, by Daniel Shanahan
  6. Peerwith – connecting experts, by Joris van Rossum
  7. Citizen Science, Open Science & scientific publication, by Muki Haklay

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Keep an eye out for future events and join the LinkedIn group or follow them on Twitter.

Scholarly Social

@ScholarlySocial

#ScholarlySocial

Overleaf

@overleaf

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