Tag Archives: Publishing Industry

Publishing Interview Tips!

You have reached the interview stage, great news! Now you have to face the dreaded interview. Don’t worry, we have some interview dos and don’ts for you to master your publishing interview, and maybe even enjoy it!

Do

  • Use the job description and person specification to hone in on the skills and competencies they are looking for
  • Practice an interview situation with your friends or family
  • Greet the interviewer with a firm (but not bone breaking!) handshake
  • Take copies of your cv, covering letter and relevant documents with you
  • Dress well; publishing is a creative industry and you can express yourself with your dress whilst looking smart
  • Leave plenty of time to get to your interview; being late will make you feel stressed prior to the interview
  • Keep eye contact, wait for your turn to speak and listen carefully to the questions you are being asked
  • Answer the question and express yourself clearly (practice will help with this)
  • Be honest
  • Ask questions! An interview is also your opportunity to see if the company will be a good fit for you as well as you for them, so prepare some well researched questions in advance
  • Be confident in your skills and abilities, have examples ready which demonstrate your experience in relation to the job requirements
  • Show your enthusiasm! You can also follow up after the interview to thank them for their time

Don’t

  • Dress too casually
  • Complain about your previous role or employer! You want your interview to be a positive experience
  • Lie about your skills or abilities, lies can be detected! You also don’t want to be in a difficult situation if you find yourself unable to do the job
  • Be too hard on yourself if you do not answer a question quite right, instead remain positive and move onto the next. You won’t be judged for making a mistake on one question
  • Bring up salary, holidays and benefits unless your interviewer does
  • Be blunt or too simple in your answers with just a `yes’ or `no’, you are expected to explain where possible, without rambling
  • Talk over your interviewer or finish their sentences for them

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Who are Jessica Kingsley Publishers?

We had a fantastic evening at the Book Machine: Meets Jessica Kingsley Publishers event yesterday! It was great to hear from the panel on how JKP works, how they develop their list, how they market to their audience and what makes them different from other publishers.

JKP made its name through publishing specialist literature on autism. As awareness grew, their list grew and they are now market leaders. JKP identify niche markets and identify the needs of a specific group of people.

Here we have summarised what each of the speakers had to say about their role within JKP.

Lisa Clark – Editorial Director

Lisa has been at JKP since 2007.

JKP published their first book on autism in 2006. The list now comprises of 650 books from picture books for children to parenting memoirs and is an internationally recognised list.  

How does JKP maintain and develop an established list? It is important that they stay ahead of the curve and maintain creativity. It is key for editors to stay in touch with the community by meeting people constantly, attending events and being present online. Editors do this by tuning in to the debates on twitter so they can identify emerging topics. This network brings authors to JKP.

JKP champions strength and difference. Editors identify sensitivity to readership, to language for example, so that they can maintain strong relationships with communities. Lisa says that this sensitivity is what makes JKP stand out compared to other publishers who dabble in and out of these markets.

They champion autistic thinking and provide support for the challenges. 8/10 of top e-books last year were from the autism list and they are now looking to create more digital content.

What drew Lisa to JKP? Lisa fell into her role but cannot imagine herself leaving, after being at JKP for 12 years.

Andrew James, Senior Commissioning Editor

Andrew manages the gender and diversity list. The list has filled gaps in the market and now successfully dominates it. This year JKP will publish their first book on the overlap between autism and transgender people. Andrew says that other publishers might see some topics as too niche but for JKP they are a goldmine!

To build a list takes a lot of research; editors cannot go in blind, instead they need to understand the language and terminology, issues faced by communities and current debates. They also look at how other publishers have approached the topic, what they did wrong and what they did right.

JKP publishes in a vertical way; they publish resources for children, teens and adults. This means that they have left no opportunity for other publishers to muscle in on their market.

Andrew says that the authors are the experts! The authors know what the market wants. JKP does not work with agents instead they commission from inside the community.

The challenge is to stay ahead of the pack and identify new audiences to reach out to. JKP avoids trends and has moved away from memoirs and introductory books.

Andrew also stays on top of what is new on social media, what is being written about on blogs. YouTube is also a platform for people to share and speak about their experiences.

What drew Andrew to JKP? Andrew used to work in academic publishing but he got sick of monographs. Andrew loves that in the morning he can be working on a children’s book and in the afternoon he can be working on a professional book. Andrew is also passionate about LGBT rights.

Sarah Plows – Marketing Manager

The marketing team is made up of 6 marketing executives who each have responsibility for a certain list and market towards a certain group.

The marketing team immerse themselves in the needs and concerns of their customers. They do this by communicating at every point through email, conferences, over the phone and by reading specialist press and twitter. This allows the team to be aware of sensitivities.

Their long-term strategy for the niche market is to build their mailing list (230,000 contacts) of already engaged customers who have made a commitment to the brand. They can then use email marketing to target these contacts.

Content marketing is also important; the blog has 200,000 hits a year. The team ensures the content is as discoverable as possible, for example by framing headings as questions that people may use in google searches.

The marketing team also leverage their author relationships and connections. Their authors may have links to professional organisations, some authors work for NGO’s.

What drew Sarah to JKP? Sarah loves that JKP has a wide remit to be innovative and take risks. Publishing a diverse range for a diverse audience and meeting audience needs is rewarding for Sarah.

Lily Bowden – Senior Publicity and Marketing Executive

Lily says that autism, gender and mental health currently have the most publicity appeal. 

“Own voices” is a buzz term at the moment with authors sharing their own experiences. It is important for Lily to put the author’s voice at the forefront of her pitches and to find something relatable within own voices stories.

Lily treats her authors as a fount of knowledge, they are the experts and the best people to learn from and talk to. This not only generates trust with the authors that their story will be told in the right way but also gives Lily confidence to pitch their story.

Lily has learned that it is ok to miss the big opportunities. It can feel counter intuitive to miss publicity opportunities but it is her job to make sure they are the right fit for her authors. A learning experience was with 2 authors, 1 who was transgender and both on the autism spectrum who were invited to the ITV show This Morning, it was an uncomfortable and awkward interview.

Lily finds allies in the media, for example journalists and publications sensitive to the cause or already producing content about current issues. This means that stories will not be twisted to fit a house style, but instead their profile will be raised organically because journalists are on board and supporting the authors.

What drew Lily to JKP? Lily loves the variety and being able to work on books that teach you something. Lily hopes she has been made a better and more liberal person.

Pippa Adams – Special Sales and Rights Assistant

Sales for niche publishers differs in that they do a lot of work with NGOs and support groups rather than to the big supermarkets and retailers. JKP builds and maintains relationships with specialist booksellers and suppliers.

JKP’s books are stocked by specialist retailers who are in close contact with the communities they work with. The booksellers may not be huge but it is important to build strong relationships with them so that their books reach communities that these booksellers engage with every day.

Pippa also builds relationships with academic professionals and library suppliers.

Pippa uses her authors as a resource. For example, an author may head up an organisation that could present an opportunity for book sales. Local authority and government spending can be opaque in terms of how the money is being spent, however authors may have contacts, which allows Pippa to spot trends.

With regards to translation rights, the back list is very important. As different countries become more aware, there are spikes of interest. For example, recently this has been the case in Russia with autism. As knowledge grows and spreads, opportunities come organically.

What drew Pippa to JKP? Pippa previously worked in educational publishing in the Middle East and became aware of JKP as her younger brother has autism. When the opportunity to work in the UK and when JKP were looking she jumped at the chance. From a rights and sales perspective, she enjoys knowing that she is spreading something good and not just books.

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Flexible working: Does it work for employee and employer?

We had a fantastic response to our blog competition and we do aim to answer all of your brilliant questions!

The team decided that ‘Flexible working: Does it work for employee and employer?’ should be the first question we address as it’s very much a hot topic and the question of flexible working is often raised by our candidates when considering a role.

We have researched this topic by asking our clients their company’s stance on flexible working, what policies they have or what is in their pipeline for the future.

Types of flexible working you might consider:

  • Part-time
  • Term-time
  • Job-sharing
  • Flexitime
  • Compressed hours
  • Working from home on a regular basis

Our clients have noticed a shift from flexible working being more focused on hours e.g. flexible starts and finishes to now moving onto location.

Does it work for employee?

We all dread that rush hour commute and we all wish we could have been home for that boiler repair, right? The opportunity to avoid commuting (even once a month!) and make that all important appointment is a huge stress reliever.

Flexible working and the trust that comes with it from our employers gives employees a positive feeling and a sense of autonomy, encouraging a positive attitude towards their work.

An office atmosphere is great! However, if a member of staff has a lot on and needs to focus, this atmosphere can sometimes be a distraction. Allowing an employee the option of working from home can be beneficial as they can work without distractions.

Some employees don’t enjoy working from home, instead they miss that social interaction and that is fair enough!

It goes without saying that for employees with children or family commitments, flexible working is extremely beneficial.

Does it work for employer?

Our clients recognise that allowing employees to work from home, is a trust exercise and employees have reacted positively to this. In particular millennials are expecting a more flexible work environment and companies need to respond to a changing workforce.

For expanding or small companies, flexible working is also a positive because it allows for a better working environment in terms of space. Small offices can be quite cramped and stuffy, by employees taking it in turn with their flexible working allows for a much more comfortable working environment in the office.

A concern our clients acknowledged was centred on creativity. People often work best when they can bounce off each other and discuss ideas and their concerns in person. So there is a need for people to be present for meetings and to maintain communication between teams.

However, with most people having access to good wifi, it’s possible to have meetings from remote locations using Skype / Google hangout etc – once everyone gets the hang of it this works fine!

Does it work for employee and employer? YES!

The response from our clients was overall positive and flexible working has become part of company consciousness and improving working standards.

For some clients their flexible working policies are already in place with employees working one day a week from home (with successful completion of probation period in mind) for others the policies have started with some improvements to go.

If flexible working does not have a negative effect on the working standards then why not!

Further Reading:

https://www.cipd.co.uk/knowledge/fundamentals/relations/flexible-working/factsheet (You can register and get full details)

https://www.rec.uk.com/news-and-policy/policy-and-campaigns/ongoing-campaigns?a=154804

https://www.publishers.org.uk/activities/inclusivity/inclusivity-action-plan/

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/apr/16/flexible-work-parents-child-free-control

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Companies: Why You Should Consider Temps

Why You Should Consider Temps

Companies: Why You Should Consider Temps

Our articles on temping have typically been to inform candidates of the many benefits that come with temping, both professionally and personally. But today, we’d like to point out the many reasons why temping is such a useful avenue for clients to consider.

  • The flexibility of temps also means company flexibility.

If you’re expanding your team but you’re not quite prepared to hire a permanent person, a temporary employee is a great way to establish exactly what it is you need in terms of additional resources. Maybe you’ve never had extra hands on deck and you’re only now starting to realise the new objectives you can tackle. A temp-to-perm scenario can be a match made in heaven for company and employee alike. As someone grows into a newly created role and reveals the kind of results that can be produced with more staff. The manager can then take these results to HR as Exhibit A on what expanding the team can mean for everyone.

But more than that,

  • Temps bring their own expertise with them.

They don’t need to be entry-level candidates acting as a stop-gap. By hiring consultants or veteran freelancers, a company also gets to avail of a temporary worker’s own experiences, the different business practices they’ve witnessed in their time. New blood often means new ideas and even if the worker doesn’t stick around, their contributions can last forever.

And, of course,

  • Temporary workers can provide much needed breathing space to permanent employees.

When the day-to-day administration is taken off their hands, they’re able to concentrate on the bigger picture and implement the projects. This improve service and streamline practices. You can get a lot done when you don’t have to sweat the small stuff. Even if it’s only for a little while.

So, for anyone who’s currently reviewing team numbers or work-loads, don’t commit until you know for sure exactly what you need – try a temp today! Get in touch with Kellie Millar, who manages our Temps and Freelancers desk, or her colleague, Alison Redfearn, and they can send you more workers than you can shake a stick at!

5 reasons to get a temp:

  • Cover sick leave
  • Cover holiday
  • Help with a project
  • Flexibility – have for 1 day / 1 week / 1 month…
  • No admin – we cover all payment, NI, holiday pay, pension

Kellie Millar
E: kelliemillar@atwoodtate.co.uk
Tel: 02070347897

Alison Redfearn
E: alisonredfearn@atwoodtate.co.uk
Tel: 02070347922

You can also contact us with any questions via our social media pages: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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PPA Business Class: The Tech and Data One

ppa-business-class-tech-and-data

You may remember that on the 21st October we attended the PPA Marketing Conference; well on the 18th November we will be attending the Tech and Data One!

For more information about the event click here!

Here’s a brief summary of the sessions you can attend on the day:

Sessions:

The Panel: Systems, Big Data And Making the Money
As a senior tech executive, how do you drive strategy and help business grow? What are the partnerships you can seek to create, and are there particular skill sets you can hire to help meet your objectives?

  • Creative Advertiser partnerships
  • Strategies for data-focused technologies
  • Investing in specialised staff and skills

Other sessions at the event include topics on:

  • Data
  • Compliance and Legality
  • Transformational Publishing
  • Suppliers: The Inside Track

Speakers Include:

Chris Fosberry, CTO, Argus Media
Mark Brincat, CTO, The Economist Group
Mike Fraser, CTO, Wilmington plc
Jonny Kaldor, CO-Found, Kaldor Group
Sean Hayes, Group Head of Data, Incisive Media
Duncan Smith, Director, iCompli
Lee Atkinson, AWS Enterprise Solutions Architect

We’re happy to be an official sponsor for this event, as we were for the last which you can read about here!

Two of our consultants, David Martin and Kellie Miller,  will be attending the event! David handles all of our IT and Data roles whilst Kellie is the Temps team manager. Please feel free to contact them via their emails, which can be found here, or via LinkedIn to request a meeting or to get in touch on the day.

Let us know if you’re attending the event on Twitter, Facebook and don’t forget to share any photos on Instagram!

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