Tag Archives: Publishing Recruitment Agency

10 Dos and Don’ts of CV Writing

Are you putting off writing or editing your CV? One of the most commonly asked questions we get is about the format of CV’s. To help you along with your CV writing process we have written a summary of our top 10 dos and don’ts of CV writing!

Dos:

  • Keep your CV at two pages max (we know it is hard!). You need to demonstrate you can prioritise relevant information with the content you provide
  • Introduce yourself in a personal statement at the top of the page, including your skills and what you are looking for in a few sentences
  • Include your contact details and a link to your LinkedIn profile
  • Save your CV in a word doc or PDF in the format `full name and CV’  
  • Set out the dates of your employment, the company and your position clearly with accurate spacing
  • You can include a brief description of the company you worked for, followed by bullet points to present your achievements, using figures and stats where necessary (use power words!)
  • The education and employment sections should be in reverse chronological order. You can include a `relevant experience’ section
  • Have a skills section highlighting any IT and language speaking skills. You can also include any courses/training, driving skills or leadership skills that are relevant
  • Choose a professional font, one that is easily read and looks good when printed or scanned
  • Important: Be meticulous in your spelling and grammar!

Don’ts:

  • Avoid long, chunky looking paragraphs (white space is your friend!)
  • List all of your GCSEs/O-Levels or every module from your degree, just those related to the job you are applying for
  • Experiment with size (making the text bigger to fill the space/smaller to fit) or wacky colours and fonts
  • DOB, picture and marital status are not necessary
  • Use acronyms, technical terms or clichés (instead demonstrate clichés such as `hard worker’ in your experience and achievements)
  • Use personal pronouns
  • Include irrelevant skills and work experience (not including them will not decrease your chance of getting the job!)
  • Explain why you left every single position. You can cover this at interview, but also in your covering letter.  If you are not currently in employment and want to explain why, put a brief note in your covering letter.  If you are applying through an agency, be transparent with them and they can help you to explain.  If you have done a series of fixed term contracts, putting “fixed term contract” next to the job title will signal that this is why you haven’t stayed longer in the role
  • Submit your CV with unprofessional email addresses or names
  • Lie! With a simple search a lie can be found out and this won’t go down well with your interviewer

Extra Tip: Don’t leave gaps.  Account for any gap years/sabbaticals or times out of work, but briefly and without it becoming distracting.  If you omit something, it will raise more questions than a brief sentence accounting for the gap.

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Inclusivity and Diversity in Publishing

Building inclusivity is a top priority in the UK, and we in the publishing industry must also work to establish best practice in the recruitment process in order to bring in diverse voices and varied experience.  Coming from a different cultural background myself and having worked in publishing and recruitment, I have built up a passion for this topic, and I am very keen on making an impact within the publishing industry.

As a team at Atwood Tate, we have had Equality and Inclusion training and I recently attended the Building Inclusivity in Publishing conference put on by The Publishers Association and The London Book Fair.  The conference gathered different panels of representatives from the publishing industry, who spoke about what they have done/are doing to encourage and educate publishing companies to build a more inclusive work environment. 

On International Women’s Day, I spent an afternoon attending a forum on Inclusivity and Diversity, hosted by the Recruitment & Employment Confederation. This forum gathered recruitment professionals from different industries and explored how a better understanding of intersectionality can support a more inclusive recruitment process and deliver a truly diverse candidate sheet.

During the conference, Mark Gales from Young Women’s Trust explained how recruiters and HR professionals can support young women, as studies show that 53% of young women feel worried and uncertain about the future.  By signing up as a volunteer with the YWT, recruiters and HR professionals can offer coaching and tailored job application feedback for young women to build up employability and their confidence.  After using the coaching service, 92% of attendees felt more confident in presenting their CV and felt they had a better understanding of what employers are looking for.  Even more encouraging was that 55% of young women got a new job/work experience.

On offering support to disadvantaged people who are trying to get into employment, Gemma Hope from Shaw Trust explained that we can help candidates by organising a non-panel-setting interview, or even offering candidates a work trial to assess ability, as some candidates might find a traditional interview process distressing.  In the financial sector in particular, some recruitment processes require no CV submissions and a solely question-based application form, from which gender, education background and age are excluded, has replaced the traditional CV and cover letter format: a solely skills-based assessment.

In the publishing industry, we are trying different recruitment approaches and we are still searching for a way to establish best practice across the whole industry.  In academic publishing, we have started to see publishers encourage salary transparency during the recruitment process.  In trade book publishing, we have seen experimentation with AI recruitment.  We, as a recruitment agency have also started to offer transparency to our clients by outlining the diversity of our search. We ensure publishers are aware that we open up their vacancies to a wider pool of candidates than they may reach through traditional advertising or networking routes.  We hope to see publishing continue to blossom and grow through achieving meaningful diversity. 

Written by Clare Chan, Senior Publishing Recruitment Consultant.

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Industry Spotlight: Temping

 

 

Welcome to Atwood Tate’s industry spotlight series, where we go behind the scenes of each of our recruitment desks to give you the scoop on working with Atwood Tate. Our first entry is with our wonderful temps and freelancers desk, manned by Kellie Millar and Alison Redfearn. Kellie and Alison help clients not just in London but nationwide, and they work with temps and freelancers at all levels, in all publishing sectors from trade and education to Scientific and academic as well as professional and B2B. They also proudly help and support many interns gain their first paid assignments in publishing. The temps desk is supported by Anna Slevin, who helps with on-boarding new temps, administering holiday pay and dealing with all time sheet or payroll issues.

How can temping benefit my career?

Companies can’t always predict when they’ll need someone. The requirements can come fast and without notice and are urgent. If you’ve been struggling to get a job, through temping, you could actually start working tomorrow.

Due to the urgency of the requirement, sometimes, there isn’t even time for an interview. At most, the client may ask for just a quick, informal phone call so they can ask some relevant questions and gauge a candidate’s answers and then hire. That’s how quick it can be sometimes – you might hear from us on Monday and start working on Tuesday. Sometimes, our temps move directly from one role to another, developing new skills and using the temping experience to further their publishing careers step by step, or even get made permanent! Temps can be booked to cover sick leave, holiday, special projects or to take the pressure off a team whilst they are recruiting for a permanent role – they may even hire you!

What type of job sectors do you cover?

We cover temp and freelance roles across the book, journal and B2B magazine sector as well as  the ever evolving digital publishing and IT technology sectors within Editorial, Marketing, Sales and Production, Product Development, E-Learning as well as Admin and Customer Support.

What type of roles can I get as a temp?

Here is a small sample of roles we have placed!

  • Social Media and Marketing Assistant, Trade Publisher
  • Customer Support Administrator, Magazine Publisher
  • Editorial Assistant (Exams), Educational Publisher
  • Brand and Marketing Executive, Children’s Publisher
  • Production Controller, Arts Publisher
  • Part time Publicity Assistant, Non Fiction
  • Publicity Manager, Fiction Publisher
  • Marketing Executive, Scientific Publisher
  • Legislation Editor, Legal publisher
  • Freelance Sub Editor, B2B publisher

How would I get paid?

Temps are added to Atwood Tate’s payroll and get paid on a weekly basis, on an hourly rate. We use online timesheets for you to record your hours, which your manager approves. Temps also accrue holiday pay and can also opt into pensions too. Payments are paid directly into your bank account each Friday, just in time for the weekend!

What if I want to go permanent?

Temping can be an excellent route to finding a permanent role in publishing. You can treat the temporary assignment like a working interview and network with your team and various departments to learn about roles that may be coming up. There is the possibility while you are temping to be offered a permanent role. You can also apply for any internal roles you see being advertised. The beauty of temping is the variety, the opportunity to explore. More senior candidates also enjoy the flexibility that temping or freelancing offers. For those of you starting out, you can build up your admin and publishing experience and even if you don’t go temp to perm through your temp assignment, the experience gained and added to your growing CV, will put you in good stead for applying for future permanent roles.

For more information about temping or freelancing do feel free to contact us via Atwood Tate’s “Meet the team” page or to apply for temp and freelancer roles visit our job pages 

 

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The Benefits of Being a Niche Recruitment Agency

Benefits of being a niche recruitment

The Benefits of Being a Niche Recruitment Agency

Today we wanted to share the benefits of registering with a niche recruitment agency like Atwood Tate. We’re a niche agency as we only handle recruitment within the Publishing industry; this includes publishing of books, journals, magazines and online content in these sectors: academic, educational, professional, STM, trade books, business information and events, plus companies that help deliver content (but excluding newspapers or consumer magazines).

Here are some of the benefits of our being a niche agency, and how it can help you find a job within publishing:

1.       Subject Knowledge

Being a niche agency it is particularly useful to have recruitment consultants who have experience in the industry for which we are recruiting. All of our team members have experience in publishing through past careers in Rights, Marketing, Editing and Recruitment at various publishing houses in different sectors, across the globe. This makes us specifically qualified to understand what our clients are looking for in candidates and which skills are relevant on a candidate’s CV for each job.

        2. Networking

Having a team with a past in publishing is also useful in creating contacts and networking! The publishing industry is a particularly friendly industry which often converses through social media and events on a regular basis. Because of our networking and past involvement in the industry we have contacts in nearly all sectors of publishing. As such we are a trusted recruitment agency with an exceptionally strong client list.

        3. Social Media

Since we’re a niche recruitment agency all of our social media and advice posts are focussed around the publishing industry! Whilst our advice on writing CVs and Cover Letters can be applied, mostly, across all industries, are blog posts on Design CVs and YouTube videos on Academic Publishing for example, are tailored to our candidates’ needs and requests!

        4. Strong Candidates

Our clients know that when we send them a CV we are sending them a strong applicant with all the skills required for the role. With our knowledge of the industry and our registration process we can find the perfect role for each candidate, and the perfect candidate for each role. If you haven’t got the skills or experience for a particular job just yet, we can advise you on the right direction to obtain those skills and we work with you throughout your career.

          5. Temps Desk

Temps are an incredibly useful workforce in publishing. They can help cover particularly busy times of the year, such as the London Book Fair, and fill in a role during the recruitment process. Since we’re a specialist niche agency, all of our temps have the necessary skills to come into a publishing company and do the work required without much instruction.

For more information on Atwood Tate’s services and team take a look at look at our website.

You can also contact us via social media: TwitterFacebook, LinkedInYouTube or Instagram.

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