Tag Archives: publishing

Byte the Book: Publishing Networking at the Groucho Club

Get tips from industry professionals and have the opportunity to network with authors, agents, publishers and suppliers to the publishing industry.

This event will be at the Groucho Club. Byte the Book and Groucho members get in free. Non-member tickets are £20. If you are keen to join Byte the Book please sign up here.

Members and non-members need to sign up for a ticket to reserve their place.

Are you attending this event? Let us know!

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Book Machine: Reinventing Culture: How the Arts Worlds Collide in the Age of Technology

Reinventing Culture: How the Arts Worlds Collide in the Age of Technology

This is a Bookmachine event, run by the Bookmachine.

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A Day In The Life Of . . . A Temporary Rights and Permissions Assistant

Today, we have another of our temporary workers, breaking down their role as a Rights and Permissions Assistant for us!

What was your role and how long was the assignment for?

I started on a six week placement which extended to three months reviewing permission logs.  This then progressed to the current temporary contract and I have been in this role for 2 ½ years.

Were you interviewed for the role?  Yes

What were your key duties?

Reviewing published books to check any third party items such as images and quotes had been cleared for use.

Processing incoming permissions queries, preparing licenses and invoices

Processing incoming translation and other rights requests, negotiating the terms and fee payable, preparing the contract and invoice

Some marketing of titles for rights selling

Tell us about the culture?

Everyone at the company is very friendly and helpful (which has been great given how many questions I have asked of people).  Everyone is keen to produce the best books they can.  Many roles include foreign travel and even if you stay in the UK you are always working with people around the world both inside and outside the company which gives a real multi-cultural flavour to the role.

What did you like best?

There are so many things, among them I really enjoy being able to tell authors that their books are being translated. Seeing the translated books when they arrive is always a great pleasure as you never really know how they will look until you see them.

What did you learn?

Everything!  I had never done this role before and so it has been a real baptism of fire as I have learned how to use new systems and databases, copyright rules as well as refining my negotiation skills.

How did you find your experience with Atwood Tate? Great, Kellie, Michael and the team have always been very supportive and helpful at every step.

How did Atwood Tate approach you for the role? Atwood Tate’s database, job board?  I first contacted Atwood Tate after seeing the role on The Bookseller website and then spoke with Kellie about it in further detail.

Interested in temporary opportunities? Please contact Atwood Tate’s temps team administrator, Michael Lawlor michaellawlor@atwoodtate.co.uk

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How technology can make reading Fun – Bookmachine Event

If kids are glued to their devices, where do books fit in? How can we make sure they keep reading for pleasure? Our expert speakers will look at different ways to engage young people online to make reading fun.

BookMachine is an informal event series. You are guaranteed to meet someone interesting and learn something new.

Are you attending this event? Let us know!

Buy your tickets here! 

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Job Sectors in Publishing

Today, we wanted to do a brief breakdown on the different job sectors in publishing for you. A lot of graduates are interested in working in publishing but are not always sure exactly what sector they would like to work in. It’s good to keep an open mind but to also have an understanding of the fundamentals of each sector and whether it might suit you:

Business Publishing (B2B): B2B stands for Business-to-Business and means producing specialist publications and media for businesses and specialist consumer markets. Sales and marketing roles are prevalent within this sector and editorial positions will often call for journalistic qualifications like NCTJ.

Academic Publishing: This sector is responsible for the distribution of academic research and scholarly, peer reviewed articles. It suits details-oriented people, often with an academic background.

STM Publishing: STM stands for Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishing and they report on scholarly research. Like academic publishing, it suits candidates motivated by research as well as a demonstrable interest in scientific reportage.

Educational Publishing: This sector covers a variety of educational publications, from ELT (English Language Training) to creating accessible fiction for struggling readers. It can often suit candidates with a teaching background and a working knowledge of the educational system.

Professional Publishing: This sector is geared towards management and administrators within business, finance and legal industries. Like B2B, it can often require journalistic qualifications and a comprehensive knowledge of one’s subject from finance, government or law.

Print/Production Services & Library Suppliers/Distributors: This sector involves large-scale production of reading materials and is a strong area for technical-minded production assistants and controllers and candidates with an interest in logistics and operations.

Digital/Emerging Technologies: This sector is for the tech-savvy out there, candidates who have a passion for digital products, who can write about them, market them or develop them from inception.

Charity Publishing: This sector contains charities who predominantly publish their own list of titles, to increase awareness about the work they do. Candidates with an interest in local and global issues as well as a desire to make a contribution generally lean towards this area.

Publishing/Rights/Licensing Jobs: This sector covers agencies who cover copying and re-use of previously published content. They also collect licensing revenue for publishers. Candidates interested in rights and legal compliance can excel here.

Trade Publishing: Finally, Trade, one of most popular sectors for publishing graduates. This covers fiction, non-fiction and children’s publishing. It is a natural fit for creative types and, with trade editorial being perhaps the most applied for role in the industry, one might consider opting for an alternative job type within this sector, such as sales, marketing and operations.

There’s more information on our website for each sector and you can always get in touch with your questions. Once you know the direction you want to move in, you can start your journey! Contact us in London at london@atwoodtate.co.uk and in Oxford at oxford@atwoodtate.co.uk.

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Creative collaboration & the future of publishing

Writers, agents, publishers and institutional brands are all grappling with the same dilemma: how to produce high-quality books and state of the art digital content whilst at the same time judiciously managing their costs. Project management includes multiple internal and external connections and skillsets.

Take a glimpse into the crystal ball of publishing with three experts and understand how the ever-evolving role of creative collaboration will affect all of us in the future.

whitefox are 5 years old this Spring and will be celebrating with drinks for everyone after the talks.

Free for Bookmachine members, £5 before 30th April and £8 from 30th until the event date: 9th May 2017.

Buy your tickets here! 

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What I’ve Learnt from working at Atwood Tate as Administrator & Social Media Coordinator

Working at Atwood Tate
What I’ve Learnt working as Administrator & Social Media Coordinator at Atwood Tate

In July 2016 I joined Atwood Tate as a maternity cover Administrator. In October I was made permanent as the Administrator and Social Media Coordinator. Sadly I am now leaving the company which I have absolutely loved working for, for an exciting opportunity working as a Marketing and Publicity Executive at a Trade publishing house.

As Administrator, and later Social Media Coordinator, I have learnt a lot during my time at Atwood Tate! From the different publishing sectors to the true cost of London commuting!

Upon leaving University in May 2016 I hectically began applying for numerous jobs and work experience placements within publishing and had first-hand experience of the difficulty of breaking into this industry.

Publishing is an increasingly competitive world to enter into and often candidates requires a lot of experience to get an entry-level job. With work experience placements often over-subscribed and most not covering more than expenses, it was sometimes difficult to add extra work experience to my CV. Instead I developed my skills within blogging, social media and coding which eventually led to me gaining a few interviews.

If you want to learn more about how blogging, YouTubing and Coding/HTML can help make your CV’s stand out take a look at our blog posts on these subjects!

I was lucky enough to come across a vacancy at Atwood Tate and attended an interview for the role. I was later offered the position of Administrator and jumped at the opportunity to be working within the publishing industry on the recruitment side of things.

Working in recruitment is a great way to learn about the industry and to network with a lot of people working within it.

Ultimately, I’ve decided to return to my roots within publishing, but during my time at Atwood Tate I have learnt many things about this industry and have had a great time doing so:

What I’ve Learnt Working at Atwood Tate:

  • There are more sectors in publishing that just Trade, Academic and Educational. This includes: B2B (Business to Business), STM (Science Technical and Medical) and Professional publishing. These sectors are just as exciting as the three I knew about prior to joining, and are a great place to build experience and learn more about publishing.
  • Also, there are a lot more roles within publishing than just editorial. A lot of people are looking to enter Editorial positions when they first apply for publishing roles, but Publicity, Sales, Rights and many other job roles are just as engrossing and immersive within the industry
  • Recruitment Companies, such as Atwood Tate, are a great resource for job-hunters, both experienced and entry-level. Even if Atwood Tate have no available roles for entry-level candidates we have created resources for entry-level candidates across our social media and on our website. This includes fortnightly Q&As, a work experience resources page, quick email responses to inquiries and regular helpful blog posts on job applications, temping and skills development.
  • Publishing Recruitment is just as immersive as working in a publishing house. When I first joined Atwood Tate I wanted to meet people within publishing, and develop my networking abilities. Since starting I have gone to numerous Society of Young Publishers event, attended the London Book Fair and LBF seminars, gone to the Borough Book Bash and generally communicated with publishing houses and publishers via our Social Media accounts
  • And last but not least, one of the best things I’ve learnt from working at Atwood Tate: helping people to find a job within publishing is a fantastic feeling.

Not only have I met some great people outside of the office but I have also made some fantastic friends within the company as well – mostly from bringing in copious amounts of cake!

One of the best bits of feedback we can receive from candidates and clients alike is about how friendly they find the staff at Atwood Tate, and it’s true! I may be biased but the main aim of everyone at Atwood Tate is to get our candidates their dream jobs, and clients their dream employees. And to give advice during the times that we’re waiting for those jobs to come in.

I’m leaving Atwood Tate in the full knowledge that if I ever need a new job in future I will be in safe hands when coming to them.

I also leave behind our new social media which I have had the great responsibility and joy of developing, including our YouTube Channel and Instagram. I leave this in the capable hands of our new Administrator and Social Media Coordinator: Andrew Willis.

You’ll be hearing more about Andrew in the coming week! So watch out for that.

For now I leave Atwood Tate with huge thanks for the wonderful opportunities and experiences I have had. And best of luck to our new Administrator Andrew, who’s going to do a wonderful job!

 

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Stand Up For Science: Why STM Publishing in April is all about March?

Today we have a guest post from STM publishing professional, Emma Williams.

Emma Williams STM publishing

After completing an MA in Publishing at the Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies (OICPS) Emma began her career in STM Publishing almost 7 years ago at Elsevier, specializing in licensing and journal management. Emma is currently happily employed within the Health Sciences group at Wiley, helping partner societies to manage and develop their journals to their fullest potential. Also a former Society of Young Publishers Oxford Chair, Emma is a particularly keen follower of industry developments and innovation and interested in supporting early career professionals. Emma advocates The Scholarly Kitchen blog to nearly everyone she meets in Publishing, and is active on Twitter where you can get in touch via @TheRightsOne (personal) or @JournalsEmma (professional) respectively.

Stand Up For Science: Why STM Publishing in April is All About March?

You may not see it, but scientific and academic research is all around you. It helped build your house, fixed your headache, drove or cycled you to work, was mixed into your coffee and even contributed to that mysterious three lbs that you just can’t shake…

(Authors Note: This could also be the commonly practiced Schrodinger’s Biscuit Tin experiment too- if the lid is closed, are there even edible biscuits in there?)

Research in all its forms and fields is effectively the pursuit of an objective truth, often for the purpose of the benefit and/or advancement of humanity. In a time when ‘alternative’ facts and false news run riot, we must be like Indiana Jones and the Grail Knight- well informed so we can choose wisely. By this, I mean that we must try to understand and communicate the importance of well structured, methodologically sound, evidence based research practices and their contribution to defensible end results.

In the past, there have been barriers to communicating research to the public, outside of traditional scholarly journal publication.

Historically, science was commonly a pursuit for the wealthy elite and discussed in technically complex language between experts in the field firstly through correspondence, which eventually became formalized within Scholarly publishing. I would encourage everyone (especially all early career STM publishing professionals) to look at the creation of The Royal Society’s Philosophical Transactions for more on the development of early scholarly publishing.

Alongside the formalization of these academic conversations around research, history has also documented public distrust of science and scientists. Perhaps this relates to an amount of disconnect from scientific conversation, but it may also be defensive (science is always a potential catalyst for innovation) against change for reasons which people may not like, be ready for, or even fully understand. This is clearly documented internationally in many cases of fear of ‘magic’ or witchcraft, religious conflict, and even cultural stereotyping.

Just think briefly for a moment on events like the Salem Witch Trials (circa 1692), or films such as Terminator (1984). Consider novels like Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886) or Frankenstein (1818). What about the depictions in both old and new media primarily made for young children, of Belle’s so called ‘crackpot’ inventor father in the story of Beauty and the Beast (1991) ? His eccentricity (i.e. scientific curiosity) predisposes him to such general public concern that he is nearly sent to an asylum- a particularly terrifying and often permanent commitment in past days. It is clear that in the historic public consciousness, there were very real fears that scientific curiosity, or developments, left unchecked would then get humanity ‘in over their heads’ across a variety of situations.

I believe that most people, living during even the more modern dates of some of these examples, would have thought of 2017 as sufficiently advanced into ‘The Future’, to expect better understanding, explanation and truthful rationalization of some of these fears. However, the modern citizen now faces a frightening time- we see heightened (or certainly more vocalized) opposition to evidence-based science; fear of globalization; and concerns about access to quality education.

So where can we find these trusted truths, to understand our world, communicate with each other and inform appropriate decision making for public good?

Although publishers and academia alike have recognized and begun to rectify some of the conversational gaps between academic research reporting and the general public through a wide variety of science engagement initiatives (Pint of Science events, or Publisher blogs for example) there is clearly still a lot of work to be done around mitigating unfounded fears and improving integrative discussion.

Now more than ever, the public must be able to either understand research processes directly, or to trust a third party to understand these and then report research results accordingly. Only then can we assess that end result and allow it to inform our own decisions and opinions. If we are not able to understand or we do not have access to such trusted sources, we are increasingly vulnerable to choosing poorly, and any ensuing negative consequences on an individual, national and a global level.

This is why scientists, academics, publishers and many other people gathered in various locations worldwide to March for Science on Saturday 22nd April. My personal experience of the global research community is that it is richly diverse, and full of those who have decided to embrace their curiosity about how something works, or could be improved, or could be learned from, and report back to the rest of us. I consider these people- our scientists and researchers- as an advanced guard, gathering intelligence on everything from climate change to medicine to lessons from history.

It is my opinion that we should fund and support research and engage with scientists and academics wherever possible in order to ensure that we don’t repeat mistakes, help people faster and preserve our world for generations to come.

For more information, please see:

https://www.marchforscience.com/
https://hub.wiley.com/community/exchanges/discover/blog/2017/02/16/values-have-no-borders?referrer=exchanges
Want more? Please see the below articles that the author came across while writing this, for ‘interesting’ further reading:

1. ‘Fake research’ comes under scrutiny, by H. Briggs, BBC News, 27th March 2017. Accessed via http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-39357819 on 18th April 2017.

2. 8 Hilarious Historical Fears That Seriously Delayed Progress by P. Carnell, Cracked, March 11th 2015. Accessed via http://www.cracked.com/article_22224_8-plainly-stupid-fears-that-held-back-human-progress.html on 17th April 2017.

3. We have always been modern, and it has often scared us by R. Higgitt, The Guardian, 24th June 2013. Accessed via https://www.theguardian.com/science/the-h-word/2013/jun/24/technology-history-modernity-speed-fears on 18th April 2017.

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Publishing Innovation Conference 2017: Decoding Diversity

What exactly does diversity mean in the publishing world? Is it solely about equality in gender or race? Can diversity just mean a difference in ideas rather than cultures? Are we any closer to being more representative of the different experiences readers have today than we were a decade ago?

The Publishing Innovation Conference is going to attempt to answer these questions! Organised by the current MA Publishing course at London College of Communication, this conference will encourage an engaging dialogue on the topic of diversity, ranging from issues of race, gender, class, disability and accessibility and how they are being addressed within the industry.

A great topic, and very timely.

Are you going to this event? Let us know!

London College of Communication, Elephant & Castle, SE1 6SB

 

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SYP Practical Workshops: How to be a Booktuber

How to be a booktuber

SYP Practical Workshops: How to be a BookTuber

On Monday evening our Administrator and Social Media Coordinator Ellie was lucky enough to attend the first of the Society of Young Publishers (SYP) Practical workshops. The topic was:

How to be Booktuber.

The workshops are a new yearly series of workshops occurring once a month, about a different topic each month. For a full list of the upcoming workshops and how to apply to take part in one take a look at the SYP’s page here.

This workshop was run by an established Booktuber: Leena Normington, aka justkissmyfrog on YouTube.

Leena has previously worked as a Creative Producer for Pan Macmillan, running their BookBreak series on YouTube, and currently works for the Telegraph. She has been a Booktuber for 7 years and was happy to share some tips and practical advice about starting a BookTube channel.

Held at Hachette, the evening consisted of a lot of laughter, discussions and a task of pitching a YouTube video around a certain book.

The workshop was fully attended by 10 people so everyone got a chance to speak, ask questions and generally chat about the different ways YouTube can helping the publishing community within publicity, marketing, sales and more.

Here are our three top tips we took from the event:

  • Affiliate links on YouTube channels

Affiliate links are links to website and booksellers online where viewers of YouTube videos can purchase any of the products, in this case books, discussed within the video. Not only are these links great for promoting books but they’re also fantastic for monitoring how many and what type of books are being bought by the audience. Through this information a Booktuber can monitor the tastes of their audience and adapt to suit them, as well as prove that BookTube sells books!

  • YouTube & Google Analytics

Views are not everything…no, really! On YouTube when you post a video you can go to the Creator Studio and view your analytics for your channel and each individual video. Whilst getting 1000 views on a video would be fantastic, it’s better if the watch time of the video (the average length of time a person spent viewing the video) is higher or equal to the length of the video. If you have 1000 views, but the viewers only spent an average of 30 seconds watching a 4 minute video, this actually shows that this video wasn’t as successful as you thought. If a video has only 100 views but was watched for the entirety of its length this was a more successful video.

  • Tone & Topic

A strong point to take away from this workshop was the need for a consistent tone and topic across all social media channels within business. If a business has a Twitter, Instagram, newsletter etc, when building a new YouTube channel you need to build a channel that matches the established social media in tone and topic. It would be jarring to create fun, bright videos about different topics if the company’s other social media is very serious and focused solely on one topic.

BookTube is a growing social media platform, one which we ourselves have begun, and has been featured recently at several events. You can read about the BookTube event ran by BookMachine last month here.

This workshop was a lot of fun and left Ellie with a lot of information to take away; from software advice to campaign planning. It it was a fantastic evening with Leena and other SYP members and we can’t wait to hear about, and maybe attend, some of the next workshops!

For more information the workshops be sure to follow the SYP on twitter at @SYP_UK and also follow the official hashtag for the workshops: #SYPpubskills

Do you like the sound of BookTube or the SYP workshops? Let us know on any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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