Tag Archives: reading

International Women’s Day – Inspirational Female Writers

To celebrate International Women’s Day 2018, we have collected some of our favourite inspirational quotes from female writers. There were too many to include all of them, so let us know in the comments what your favourite is that we’ve missed!

‘You may shoot me with your words,
You may cut me with your eyes,
You may kill me with your hatefulness,
But still, like air, I’ll rise.’
― Maya Angelou, Still I Rise

‘I would venture to guess that Anon, who wrote so many poems without signing them, was often a woman.’
― Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own

‘I am no bird; and no net ensnares me: I am a free human being with an independent will.’
― Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre

‘No black woman writer in this culture can write “too much”. Indeed, no woman writer can write “too much”…No woman has ever written enough.’
― bell hooks, remembered rapture: the writer at work

‘I believe in the resistance as I believe there can be no light without shadow; or rather, no shadow unless there is also light.’
― Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale

‘Strengthen the female mind by enlarging it, and there will be an end to blind obedience.’
― Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

‘There’s really no such thing as the ‘voiceless’. There are only the deliberately silenced, or the preferably unheard.’
― Arundhati Roy

‘Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare.’
― Audre Lorde

‘We were scared, but our fear was not as strong as our courage.’
― Malala Yousafzai, I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban

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LGBT History Month in Books and Publishing

February is LGBT History Month in the UK, a month to remember the contributions of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people throughout history and to raise awareness of the current position of LGBT people in society. We thought this would be a good time to reflect on and celebrate LGBT authors and those working in publishing.

LGBT booksDetail of the portrait of a young woman (so-called Sappho) with writing pen and wax tablets

I am a big fan of LGBT literature, with my dissertation at university being about the influence of Sappho on twentieth century female poets – Anne Carson, with her beautiful translations of Sappho’s fragments; Amy Lowell, chronically overshadowed by her relative Robert; Olga Broumas and her collaborations with Jane Miller and T. Begley, celebrations of female love and desire.

Oscar Wilde, Virginia Woolf, Patrick Ness, Sarah Waters, Rita Mae Brown, Jeanette Winterson, Ali Smith… LGBT writers and texts have helped shape literary history, though many are forgotten, or their sexuality hidden. Many chose not to write explicitly about their sexualities, due to censorship. Today we obviously do not censor LGBT literature, though barriers remain to getting published. Books featuring LGBT characters may be considered more niche and therefore not chosen for publication. As a result, LGBT authors and characters are underrepresented on our bookshelves.

What’s changing in the publishing industry?

Publishers are trying to change this and diversify their lists. Penguin Random House launched Write Now in 2016, a programme for un-agented writers from communities underrepresented in publishing. This includes those from BAME and LGBT+ communities. Selected writers are invited to insight days and ten are selected for a year-long mentoring programme, with the aim to then publishing these writers.

Little Tiger announced today that they will be publishing a short-story anthology for young adults written by LGBT+ authors. They are now accepting submissions for PROUD from unpublished and un-agented LGBT+ writers.

Last year, Pride in Publishing launched as a network for anyone who identifies as LGBT+ working in the UK publishing industry. They hold bimonthly networking events and committee meetings which all members are welcome to attend.

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Our Favourite Books in 2017

Our favourite books in 2017 header

This has been a great year for trade publishing and we’ve been enjoying reading both new releases and older books we hadn’t quite got round to. Here are our favourites that we’ve read this year!

Claire C-S

Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders (Bloomsbury)Lincoln in the Bardo cover

The Man Booker Prize winner has been writing short stories for 20 years, but it’s his prize winning debut novel about Abraham Lincoln grieving the death of his son Willie which is already considered a masterpiece. Told through the narrative of spirits and extracts of Civil war memoir, this emotional and poignant tale of loss will stay with you forever.

Ellie

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (HarperCollins)Eleanor Oliphant cover

This debut was deservedly named WHSmith’s Fiction Book of the Year. Eleanor Oliphant is an utterly unique narrator, equal parts irritating and charming, and this story about her learning to engage with the outside world brought me to tears on more than one occasion. It also has the most realistic depiction of a cat I think I’ve ever read!

Claire L

The Mandibles: A Family, 2029–2047 by Lionel Shriver (The Borough Press)The Mandibles cover

I love a good dystopian fiction novel and this one didn’t disappoint! Lionel Shriver creates a believable very near future world which is going through major debt crisis (following an earlier crash of the internet). The US refuses to get on board with the new global currency and this leads to huge bankruptcy. We follow a family who were expecting a large inheritance, having to adjust in this new world and Shriver gives us some quirky and likeable characters as well as some awful ones – just like a normal family?!

Lucy

The Woman Who Went to Bed for a Year by Sue Townsend (Penguin)The Woman who went to Bed for a Year cover

The book I am currently reading is definitely up there with my favourites this year. Sue Townsend retains her place in my heart with The Woman Who Went to Bed for a Year. Poignant yet hilarious, this book shines a light on modern family life with the wit we expect from the woman who brought us Adrian Mole.

Tanaya

A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J Mass (Bloomsbury)A Court of Mist and Fury cover

This was actually published in 2016 but I only read it this year as I struggled to get into it during the first chapter. This was by far my favourite book of the year. The main character, Feyer, is rebuilding her life after the massive events of the last book and learns to come to terms with the person she is now. A Court of Mist and Fury is all for empowerment and putting the pieces of your life back together after an abusive relationship.  It combines the amazing fantasy world building and characters of Sarah J Mass with powerful messages about self-worth and independence.

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International Literacy Day

Today, 8th September, is International Literacy Day, a day observed by UN member states to internationally recognise the importance of literacy to individuals, communities and societies, and aims to increase literacy around the world.

You can read more about the aims of this international day here on the UNESCO website: http://en.unesco.org/themes/literacy-all/literacy-day.

This year, the focus is on Digital Literacy, and how the changes in technology and the move towards new digital environments is changing the understanding of what literacy is, and how a lack of digital literacy skills could further marginalise those without basic literacy skills.

To mark this day, some of Atwood Tate have thought back to those books which were formative in helping us learn to read initially; books which are often forgotten but are hugely important first steps.

Andrew Willis

The first  books I can remember reading were The Magic Key series, which followed Biff, Chip and Kipper, created by Roderick Hunt and published by Oxford University Press. As part of the National Curriculum, a whole generation must have learnt to read, thanks in part to The Magic Key.

Alice Crick

I still remember my parents reading the very first Harry Potter books to me as a child. It really instilled the joys of reading in me from an early age.

Claire Louise Kemp

I don’t remember learning to read, but some of the first books I remember loving were books by Beatrix Potter and the Mr Men books.

Helen Speedy

I loved the Usborne Book of Wizards and the Usborne Book of Witches.  The illustrations by the late Stephen Cartwright take me right back to childhood when I look at them now and I’m so pleased to see that they are still in print, even if it’s in a slightly different format.  I also used to spend hours looking through The Usborne First Thousand Words trying to spot the little duck in each picture. My Mum, a German teacher, also bought us a copy of this in German in the hope we’d also become linguists…

 

Atwood Tate support the charity Beanstalk, who do fantastic work providing one-to-one literacy support to children who struggle with their reading ability and confidence.

 

 

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Administrator in the Hot Seat – Andrew Willis

Our new Administrator, Andrew Willis, answers questions in the hot seat.

What three books changed your life?

Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh: As my Dad’s favourite book, I must have heard most of this book quoted throughout my life, but never quite understood its appeal until I finally read it for myself. It is an amazing book which manages to pack so much into its terse, but reverential prose. It touches on theology, belief, nostalgia, friendship and love, and is a great story.

Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams: Few people are as funny, creative and irreverent as Douglas Adams. It may often seem like insanity, but Adams’ prose is always carefully measured and pitched, and fun. Hitchhiker’s is a good reminder to not panic, and never be too serious. “The ships hung in the sky in much the same way that bricks don’t.”

Eagle Strike by Anthony Horowitz: The Alex Rider books were the first series of books I got hooked on at school. Adventure, gadgets, espionage; it offered everything. This is fourth in the series, but this is one I read first. I went back and read the other books, but Eagle Strike was quite formative in my love of books.

 

What book are you reading at the moment and what do you think of it?

I have just finished Ursula K. Le Guin’s The Dispossessed, which is a fantastic piece of science-fiction and world-building, about the twin worlds Anarres and Urras. The book which explores political issues such as differing ideologies, gender and economic systems. It also touches on theoretical physics and an envisioning of interstellar communications before the invention of the internet. Sounds like heavy reading, but it was more interesting than it sounds!

I have just started reading Herding Cats by Charlie Campbell, a more light-hearted book about Campbell’s experiences of amateur cricket captaincy of the Authors XI.

 

Is there any area of publishing you’re particularly interested in at the moment?

I am quite a big fan of audiobooks. I find them to be useful for fitting in more books when I’m commuting or too tired to read. It is quite a versatile format, as releases can take different forms from just a single narrator, to full cast dramas with music and sound effects. There are many different roles involved in audiobooks too; editorial, commissioning, production, directing, and post-production.  There is a strong market for audiobooks at the moment, and it is an exciting time for them.

 

What has been the highlight/s of the past year?

Completing and passing my Master’s Degree last September was a huge achievement. It was both a very enjoyable course, learning new skills in literary analysis, research, and also in film production, but it was also draining at times. When faced with a 20,000 word dissertation, the terror of the blank word document and a flashing cursor can be daunting as you wonder how you are possibly going to produce anything. But through hard-work, stress and adrenaline and a lot of tea, I was amazed at what I could achieve.

To find out more about the roles each of our consultants covers, go to the “Meet the Team” page: http://www.atwoodtatepublishingjobs.co.uk/Atwood/meet-the-team.asp

You can read previous Hot Seats here: https://blog.atwoodtatepublishingjobs.co.uk/category/hot-seat/

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BookMachine London: All about BookTube

Our administrator Ellie will be attending this Bookmachine event on the 29th March, at the Library in St Martin’s Lane. Learn all about BookTube from an established BookTuber
Sanne Vliegenthart. It is sure to be an interesting evening filled with fascinating new facts and fun!

Let us know if you’re attending by contacting us on any of our social media accounts: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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World Book Day

World Book Day

World Book Day

Today is World Book Day, a day in which we celebrate the written word. And on such an occasion, some might ask, Well, do books really need a day? Here in the publishing industry, we certainly think so. In fact, books are perhaps more important than ever, given recent trends in which reading has become portrayed as the pastime of ivory tower academics, out of touch with the real world, rather than the tool with which we better every aspect of our lives, from education to, as some studies show, improving empathy.

The writer William Nicholson once wrote “We read to know we’re not alone.” He credited these words to CS Lewis, the author responsible for one of the most beloved fictional universes in literary history. They succinctly describe the reason why reading has never fallen out of fashion. Despite the drastic changes to entertainment brought about by the digital age. With sales for George Orwell and Margaret Atwood soaring since a certain president’s recent inauguration, it shows that people still go to the same place they always have for comfort.

Everyone remembers the book they read as a child that changed the way they thought. They remember the time they encountered a world they wanted to live in more than their own. They remember people who don’t exist as well as they remember the people in their own lives. Everyone has that book (or books!) they’ll never sell, that moves from one home to another like a member of the family.

Here, at Atwood Tate, we’re proud to work with all kinds of publishers, helping people find their dream jobs in an industry that couldn’t be more head-over-heels in love with books. So, to celebrate World Book Day and the publishing industry, tweet us your favourite book @AtwoodTate and shout out to the writers who changed your life!

You can also shout out your favourite book on our other social media sites: Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram. And check out the official Book Day website! 

 

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Things to Bring to the London Book Fair 2017

Things to Bring to the London Book Fair 2017

Things to Bring to the London Book Fair 2017

The London Book Fair 2017 is fast approaching! It’s only 2 weeks away! And it’s time to get prepared.

Whether you are a publisher, a candidate, an author or a reader you need to remember to bring certain things to the London Book Fair. Not only your ticket but items which will make your day much more enjoyable!

Remember to bring:

Tickets:

Your CV:

  • We are the only recruitment company attending the fair with a stand, come say hello at: stand 3B26 (in Tech). We are also taking part in the Careers Clinic on the Thursday. Bring your CV to talk to help you talk to one of our consultants and to show at the Career’s Clinic. We may even take a copy of your CV, so print more than one – but don’t bring a folder. The majority of the people at the LBF are there to make deals with other publishers, not to recruit. Network with publishers at stands, but don’t force your CV on them. Instead offer…

Business Cards:

  • If you’re an author, candidate or a client and have a business card, be sure to bring them. People don’t have that much time to stop and chat at the fair, so give them a business card with details on how to get in touch.  This is a great way to get noticed and remembered.

Camera:

  • Take some photos of the event! Whether to share on social media or simply to keep track of companies you are interested in. The London Book Fair is a social event as much as an industry one, so why not take a few snaps.

Comfortable Shoes:

  • Do not underestimate the size of the Olympia – where the LBF takes place. The floors are crowded with people, stands and cafes. You will need to walk everywhere so make sure you’ve got comfortable shoes.

Bottle of Water:

  • Water is imperative at events like these. You will be walking a lot in large crowds and the queues for the café get astronomical by lunch time. Be sure to bring some water with you to stay hydrated and comfortable all day.

Notebook:

  • If you’re attending an event, be it a seminar, an author event or the Careers Clinic, so bring a notebook with you. Taking notes is encouraged. There’s a lot to remember and a lot to see. Keep track of all of it to stay informed.

Phone:

  • If you’re meeting people you will need to communicate to find them, as shouting across the hall will not work. You can also use your phone to live-tweet and follow the London Book Fair  twitter account and the official Book Fair hashtag #LBF17! People will be live-tweeting all day! Following the events on twitter is a great way to keep track of events and new throughout the day.

Make sure you keep note of these things to make the most of your attendance at the London Book Fair.

Have you bought your tickets yet? Printed off your map? Finalised which Seminars you want to attend? Found out where the seminars are and what time they start?

Visit the website for more details! And feel free to contact us on any of our social media with your questions: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Beanstalk | Story Starters

Beanstalk Story Starters

Beanstalk | Story Starters

Last month our chosen charity, Beanstalk, received some fantastic news! They were awarded £1million by the DreamFund (People’s Postcode Lottery) for their partnership ‘Story Starters’!

‘Story Starters’ is a collaborative project, which will see Beanstalk working with Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library and LuCiD at the University of Liverpool. They will be working together to help children from disadvantaged backgrounds, receive one-to-one support and mentoring to develop their language and reading skills!

Beanstalk is a national literacy charity who recruits volunteers to work in primary schools with children to help them develop their reading. Volunteers are specially trained to spend 30 minutes, two times a week, reading with a child one-to-one for a whole year. To help children develop the truly important skill of reading. In 2016 alone Beanstalk helped over 11,000 children across the UK, in deprived areas, and with this funding they can help many more.

Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library is a global programme operating worldwide, with more than 1 million children receiving books per month, to help them fall in love with reading. LuCiD is a research collaboration which is researching how children learn to communicate with language.

Beanstalk

The CEO of Beanstalk, Ginny Lunn, and the Beanstalk partners receiving their DreamFund cheque – all rights attributed to Beanstalk

Previous research has shown that support within schools at schools can benefit children throughout their life. 20% are more likely to get 5 A*-C GCSE’s and earn more as adults.

This is a very exciting time for Beanstalk and we couldn’t be more pleased for them. With the £1million funding they will be able to recruit and train a further 600 Story Starter volunteers and help 1,800 children between 3-5 years old to develop their reading!

Beanstalk is a truly worthwhile charity and we’re happy to support them! If you would like to learn more about Beanstalk, and Story Starters make sure you check out there website!

Be sure to check out our previous fundraising challenge for them, and let us know your ideas for the next! You can send us your ideas via social media or commenting on this blog post: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

 

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Our Autumn Reads (part 2)

autumn-reads-p2

Our Autumn Reads continue with three more groups of suggestions and current reads.

Helen

I am planning to read American Gods by Neil Gaiman over the next few weeks as I’ve heard a TV series is coming out and I can’t remember what happens!

american-gods

Ellie

This Autumn I plan to read Where am I now? the newly published memoir of Mara Wilson (aka Matilda!)  I also plan to read something horror-filled or thriller-ish – not The Woman in Black! – but perhaps Through the Woods by Emily Carroll. I am currently trying to finish The White Princess by Philippa Gregory which is a monster of a book but one that I’ve been meaning to read since last year!

where-am-i-now

Lucy

I am currently reading Curtain Call by Anthony Quinn. It is set in London and revolves around the theatre and Soho, so it’s fun to read about places I know. It also has prostitutes and attempted murder so it’s pretty fun stuff!

curtain-call

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