Tag Archives: Sales

Industry Spotlight: Sales and Customer Service

 

Welcome to Atwood Tate’s industry spotlight series, where we go behind the scenes of each of our recruitment desks to give you the scoop on working with Atwood Tate. This week’s entry is with Olivia Constantinides, who works on Sales, Marketing, Publicity and Customer Service roles in London and East Anglia. She covers all sectors, except B2B.

In this spotlight Olivia will focus on Sales and Customer Service roles and will tell you more about what these jobs involve and the types of skills they require. At a later date she will cover Marketing and Publicity positions.

Types of roles

Sales roles in publishing are really diverse. Whether you’re an Account Manager looking after existing customers or a Business Development Manager focused on bringing in new business, your job is to build relationships with customers and persuade them to buy your company’s products or services.

One of the great things about working in sales is that you get to handle the finished product, whether that be a children’s book, a scientific journal or an online learning platform. You also get a real insight into the market and what the customer wants or needs. This knowledge is invaluable for the business as a whole and can be used to influence what is published in the future and how products are marketed to customers.

Some sales roles will include elements of customer service and if you’re selling digital products or software, you may train customers how to use it.

Customer service roles are closely linked to sales and involve dealing with the customer post-sales, usually over phone or email. Common responsibilities include answering order or stock related queries or resolving problems and complaints.

Do sales roles involve lots of cold calling?

A common misconception is that sales roles involve endless cold calling. It’s not usually like that in publishing. You might be selling books to bookshops or retailers, or software to universities, libraries and hospitals. Therefore you’ll need to meet customers face to face and adopt a softer and more consultative sales approach.

What is the pay like in sales?

Sales salaries often exceed those of other roles. In addition to your basic annual salary you will likely receive a bonus or commission based on the amount you sell and revenue that you bring in for the company. This might be paid out monthly, quarterly or annually. It is sometimes uncapped so your earning capacity is limitless.

Is there good room for progression?

There is really good room for progression in sales. You could start out in a sales support or administrative role and gradually progress to managing your own accounts and then eventually overseeing a team of sales people.

One of the advantages of sales roles is that the skills you develop are really transferable so you could find yourself working for a variety of publishers and selling to a variety of customers. Skilled sales people will always be in demand.

Whilst there aren’t nearly as many customer service roles out there, there is still good room for progression and you could end up managing a team of Customer Service advisors and overseeing the strategy for the department. Like sales, the skills you develop are very transferable and customer service people often find themselves working for a range of organisations.

Do you get to travel?

Sales roles will usually involve some element of travel but the amount will depend largely on the role. You might look after a specific territory, which could be as big as London or the whole of the UK. Some roles can cover regions as large as Europe, the Middle East, Latin America or Asia. International sales people may find they are travelling at least 50% of their time. If you like being out and about, a field based or international sales role would suit you.

On the other hand, some roles are more office based, with most sales being conducted over the phone or via email and only occasional visits to customers being needed. You may find the opportunities to travel increase as you progress into more senior positions.

Customer service roles are usually office based but depending on the company you work for, you may take occasional trips to visit colleagues in other offices, which could be in the UK or overseas.

 

What key skills do you need to succeed?

To succeed in sales you need excellent communication and presentation skills. You need to be results and target driven with a good head for numbers and a knack for negotiating. You also need to be driven, determined and ambitious.

For customer service roles, excellent communication skills are also vital along with the ability to problem solve and empathise with customers.

If you’re considering a sales or customer service role in publishing or already work in the industry and are looking for your next opportunity, contact Olivia at olivia@atwoodtate.co.uk.

 

Atwood Tate recruits across all levels and all functions so if you are looking for a new role in publishing please get in touch with us at info@atwoodtate.co.uk. We also have a very active temps and freelance desk, so if you are open to short term contracts or are looking to boost your freelance career, you can reach Alison at alisonredfearn@atwoodtate.co.uk.

 

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BookTube 101: An evening with Sanne Vliegenthart & BookMachine

BookTube 101

BookTube 101

On Wednesday our Administrator and Social Media Coordinator Ellie attended the BookMachine’s event: BookTube 101.

BookTube is the name given to the community of book vloggers on YouTube (channels dedicated to the discussion of books) and booktubers are the given name of the vloggers that run these channels.

One such booktuber is Sanne Vliegenthart, of BooksandQuills, who was the guest host of the event. She came to discuss the relevance of BookTube to the publishing industry and how she has developed her own BookTube channel and career.

Starting out in 2008 Sanne created her channel BooksandQuills to discuss things she was interested in. At the time she was studying for an English Literature degree, so she wanted to discuss what she was reading. Sanne also covered other topics, as BookTube was not officially a ‘thing’ until around 2011.

In 2009 she began to focus more heavily on books when she took part in the 50 Book Challenge, a challenge to read 50 books in one year. Audiences were responsive to her videos documenting her progress, and she found her subscribers growing due to the challenges popularity.

Now, in 2017, her channel has over 160,000 subscribers, 11 million views and she has created over 600 videos since 2008.

BookTube & Publishing

Sanne links her successful BookTube channel to her getting a career in publishing. She currently works as the Social Media producer for Penguin Random House, and she previously worked for Hot Key Books, an imprint of Bonnier, as Digital and Social Media Manager.

With social media being a part of our everyday lives and new jobs within publishing being created specifically to accommodate and utilise it, a background in booktubing and blogging are a growing way to break into the publishing industry. You can read our post on using blogging to get into publishing here.

Along with discussing the benefits of booktubing on her career development, Sanne also discussed the relevance of BookTube to publishers looking to develop their marketing, sales and publicity approaches.

For most booktubers in Britain, booktubing is a hobby that is done alongside a full-time job or education. Out of the close community of booktubers Sanne is a part of, none of them are professional full-time YouTubers. But many of them do have links to the publishing community.

Some are social media producers at other publishing houses, others are writers, booksellers, freelance editors, marketing assistants and more.

BookTube & Publicity

Sanne then discussed how BookTube can help publishing companies publicise books and journals, similarly, if not more so, than blogs and blog tours.

  • YouTube videos often create more comments and discussions than blog posts do.
  • They can last longer than a blog post – imagine writing a 10 minute video into a cohesive blog post.
  • It’s easy to share content and they’re visually appealing
  • Subscribers of booktubers can develop a personal connection with the booktuber, through reading tastes, professionalism and consistency of posting.

BookTube & Sales

As an example, Sanne has procured, roughly, £45,000 for the publishing industry, selling books through an affiliate link to the Book Depository.

She pointed out that this figure is from one affiliate link only. She cannot monitor the amount her subscribers are spending buying books from her recommendations in shops, online or via subscriptions to websites such as Audible.

The topic turned from how booktubers can help to how they should be approached. Since booktubing is a hobby most booktubers will only read and discuss books that they themselves want to read. Sometimes they are sent books and publicity materials from publishers, but rarely accept anything unsolicited. Often publishers will request to send a book to a booktuber, but there is no requirement that they discuss the book on their channel unless they want to.

It is clear from Sanne’s channel and statistics alone that BookTube is incredibly popular and a worthwhile consideration to the development of the publishing industry.

Our YouTube Channel

We are very interested in the topic of BookTube and hearing some tips for starting a channel from Sanne, as we ourselves have a YouTube channel. So far we have created videos on topics such as How to get a Job Interview in PublishingHow to get into Academic Publishing and shared a vlog of our time at the London Book Fair 2017, among others. We’ve recognised the potential of YouTube for the publishing industry and are utilising it for recruitment.

We want to say a big thank you to BookMachine for holding the event, and to Sanne for hosting! Ellie had a great time!

For more information contact us on any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Types of Sales Roles in B2B Publishing

Types of Sales Roles B2B

Types of Sales Roles in B2B Publishing

There are many different types of sales roles within publishing. It is worth asking what type of sales role you are applying for, and highlighting which type you’ve done on your CV, when applying for a job.

Our Sales Consultant in the London office, Olivia, has put together a list of the key types of sales roles to explain further.

The key types are:

  • Delegate – selling delegate spaces (i.e. tickets) to attend events and conferences
  • Sponsorship – selling sponsorship opportunities for events. It can also refer to sponsored editorial content, which is when companies pay to publish an article in your publication as a way of promoting their own brand.
  • Advertising – selling advertising space. Can be either print (e.g. a print publication or magazine) or online (eg. a website). It can also be classified (i.e. no graphics, inexpensive small messages) or display (these include graphics and colour and might take up half a page or more).
  • Subscriptions – selling a subscription to a product. Can be print (e.g. a print publication or magazine) or digital (e.g. an online database or service).
  • Conference production – this isn’t really classified as media sales. It’s basically a varied mix of sales, marketing, editorial and project management but for entry level conference production roles clients usually want someone with some sales experience, such as delegate sales.

A B2B Sales role, for example, could involve just one or several of these types of sales. It’s quite common to see delegate and sponsorship sales together or delegate and subscriptions.

Generally the skill set required for each type of sales role, and the types of clients they deal with, will be similar. But it’s always best to check with our consultants beforehand which ones the role involves just to avoid confusion.

For more information about Sales roles you can view our current vacancies page and select Sales in preferences.

You can also contact us on info@atwoodtate.co.uk or 020 7034 7900. Or via social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

 

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Writing a Winning Sales CV

Writing a Winning Sales CV

Writing a Winning Sales CV

Creating the perfect CV is one of the most important things for any job seeker. But particularly so for sales people. Where a journalist can submit samples of their writing or a designer a portfolio of work, as a sales person your CV has to do most of the talking.

Having reviewed many CVs in my time in recruitment, I’ve come to identify what makes an effective and well written CV for sales roles. There are many simple bits of information that candidates miss out which may affect their chances of being considered for a job.

So you don’t make the same mistake, I’ve compiled some guidelines of key things to include!

Whether a second jobber or an experienced sales manager you should include:

  • Sales figures – Where possible you should include details of revenue achieved, targets met, sales made etc… Always make sure they are honest and that you can back them up if asked about them in an interview.
  • Achievements – You should give examples of particular successes you’ve had, whether securing a large deal, signing on a new client…
  • Products & clients – If you’ve worked for a large organisation do specify what area of the business or publication you worked on or what type of products you were selling. It’s also useful to know who you were selling to or specific regions you dealt with.
  • Languages – If you have professional competency in more than one language and would be willing to use it at work, tell us! It might be just what a particular client is looking for.
  • Travel – If you are used to travelling a lot and enjoy it, it’s good to know and if applying for field sales positions, do mention if you have a clean driving licence and car.
  • Line management – If you’ve managed staff, say how many and whether they were office or field based.

Last but not least, being a successful sales person is often very much about your personality so don’t be afraid to let this show on your CV. Also remember that you need strong communication skills and to be well presented and professional so your CV should demonstrate this.

For more general advice on CV layout, you should visit https://atwoodtatepublishingjobs.co.uk/advice/.

If you have any questions get in touch via social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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