Tag Archives: social media

Byte the Book | Buzz Words: How Can You Build a Community Around Your Content

Last night I attended Byte the Book’s event on marketing and building a community around your content, sponsored by Bookswarm. As Atwood Tate’s Social Media Coordinator, I found the talk from industry leaders and influencers really interesting.

We gathered in the chapel at the House of St Barnabas (a not-for-profit private members’ club working against homelessness), which was a beautiful if unconventional venue. The wine I’d bought not long before had to be quickly finished off as we couldn’t bring alcohol into the chapel. As I sat on a hard wooden pew, I drafted a tweet with an image of the chapel, which I immediately had to delete upon being told the crucifix hanging over the alter was in fact copyrighted.

the chapel and full audience waiting for the discussion to begin

The chapel sans crucifix

At any other panel talk, the audience being glued to their phones throughout would be considered rude. At a digital marketing discussion, it’s encouraged, with live updates from the #BytetheBook hashtag projected on to the screen behind the speakers.

Digital Marketing Tips from the Panellists

Lysanne Currie, a journalist and digital strategist, chaired the discussion. She began by asking Laura Lindsay, Director of Global Communications at Lonely Planet, about the community of travellers Lonely Planet has built online and offline. Lindsay recounts how Lonely Planet started its online community in the 1990s by sharing letters from their readers. They were one of the first brands on Twitter, and built their following by sharing content from their community of travellers, not just sharing marketing materials. Building an online community, she says, is no different to building a ‘real world’ community.

Children’s author Piers Torday notes the barriers to connecting directly with readers online when those readers are children, so he embeds himself in distinct communities of parents, librarians and teachers. These are the gatekeepers and the people who buy children’s books. He also discusses the differences between content on different platforms. Twitter, he says, is great for conversations. Instagram is best for curated storytelling.

Leena Normington, YouTuber and Social Media Producer at Vintage Books, advises the audience to choose what platform(s) work for you, and not worry about using every platform. She notes the different demographics engaging with different media – for example podcasts tend to have a slightly older and more male audience than YouTube videos. She also emphasises treating your online audience as real people, not only as viewers or subscribers.

The panellists agree that the key to a great social media presence is to be consistent and to be genuine. Have a schedule for uploading content and show who you are as a person, rather than just marketing your book. Try new things and experiment, see what works for you and it’s okay to stop if it’s not working.

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Best Book and Publishing-Related Podcasts

When I’m not listening to an audiobook on my way to work, I love listening to podcasts – especially ones about books and publishing! It’s no secret that the audio sector is growing, whether through audiobook services like Audible, Kobo or Google Play, or through the rise of podcasts. Here are a few of my favourite book and publishing-related listens:

1)    Mostly Lit

A weekly books and pop-culture podcast from Alex Reads, Rai, and Derek Owusu. Aimed at a millennial audience, this is a fun and accessible podcast that promotes reading as something for everyone to enjoy. It makes reading cool again, discussing books alongside films and TV.

You can find them on Twitter @MostlyLit

2)    Minorities in Publishing

This publishing industry podcast from Jenn Baker interviews publishing professionals as well as authors and others related to the industry about diversity (or the lack thereof) in book publishing.

You can find them here: http://minoritiesinpublishing.tumblr.com/

3)    BBC Radio 4 Books and Authors

BBC Radio 4 hosts a number of high quality book podcasts, which include interviews with high-profile authors and public figures. It tends to focus on more literary fiction. Harriett Gilbert hosts A Good Read, where she discusses people’s favourite books. Recent episodes feature Ruby Tandoh, Nicola Sturgeon, and Stephen Fry. Also see Radio 4’s other podcasts – Bookclub and Short Story in particular are worth a listen.

Download Books and Authors here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02nrsfl/episodes/downloads

4)    Guardian Books

Similar in tone to the Radio 4 podcasts, the Guardian’s version is a weekly show hosted by Claire Armistead, Richard Lea, and Sian Cain with interviews and discussions about latest book trends and themes. Recent episodes cover LGBT must-reads and Helen Dunmore’s posthumous Costa prize.

Find all episodes here: https://www.theguardian.com/books/series/books

5)    Time Literary Supplement – Freedom, Books, Flowers & the Moon

This weekly podcast from the TLS takes its name from the Oscar Wilde quotation, ‘With freedom, books, flowers, and the moon, who could not be happy?’ Stig Abell, Thea Lenarduzzi and Lucy Dallas are joined by special guests and discuss articles from the week’s edition of the magazine, covering literature and related topics, including politics, culture, language and history.

All episodes are on their website and can be found here: https://www.the-tls.co.uk/podcast-freedom-books-flowers-moon/

6)    Book Riot

Book Riot is well worth a listen for their accessible discussions of book-related news. There is a notable American bias, but any global publisher today will want to keep up with what’s happening in the book world over the pond.

Find it on the Book Riot website (and while you’re there, it’s also worth taking a look at the other content on there!): https://bookriot.com/listen/shows/thepodcast/

Let us know in the comments or on social media what you’ve been listening to recently!

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Q&A Round Up

Last week was the Publishers Association’s #workinpublishing week! We did a Q&A on Twitter – if you missed it, you can catch up here.

Q: What are the key features recruiters look for in a CV and Cover Letter when recruiting for entry level publishing jobs?

A: Office/admin experience is useful across the board, as are work experience, internships or temp roles in publishing houses! A well written, clear and concise cover letter will also get you a long way.

Q: How important do you think events like literary events and trade shows are?

A: Getting to know people at industry events can be really useful, especially as you can get a feel for different roles and sectors! Having said that, it’s not compulsory, so if you don’t live in London and you can’t get to events easily, don’t worry!

Q: When considering a job offer, it’s not just about salary. What else should candidates be thinking about?

A: Consider what’s important to you – the commute time, flexible working opportunities, training/professional development and company benefits!

Q: What are the most desirable additional tools to have experience in?

A: It depends on the role! But skills like InDesign, social media, general admin/database experience are useful for a lot of publishing work.

Q: I have a lot of volunteer experience with indie pubs, and I’m starting to look for my first publishing job. What would you say my next step should be?

A: Sounds like you should start applying for entry-level roles! You’d also be a great temping candidate, which can sometimes lead to long term roles.

Q: how can I make myself stand out from the hundreds of other graduates when applying for jobs?

A: Make your cover letter stand out by talking about your work experience, any temp roles, admin experience, and extracurricular interests which give you transferable skills!

Q: Are entry level publishing roles hard to come by? I feel like I haven’t seen many around since I graduated.

A: Entry-level roles are VERY competitive so get filled quickly, but a great way to get your foot in the door is through temping! Register with us for temping opportunities and we may be able to help.

Q: What are the most in demand roles in publishing?

A: Most people want to work in editorial, but publishers are always looking for Commissioning Editors and Production Controllers!

Q: What are your top tips for writing a good CV?

A: Be clear and concise, use bullet points, and put most relevant experience at the top! No long paragraphs please! For more tips see our blog post here.

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Beanstalk and Reading Matters have joined forces!

We were delighted to hear that Beanstalk who we’ve been supporting for the last 7 years has now merged with another literacy charity, Reading Matters. This will allow them to support even more children and young people and help them to achieve their 2020 vision of working with 30,000 children.

The aim of the charity is to help children from disadvantaged backgrounds gain confidence in reading. Beanstalk provides 1-1 reading support to children in primary schools and early years, Reading Matters covers secondary schools so this is a great combination.

In 2016-17 Reading Matters helped 6,497 children and young people while Beanstalk worked with 11,000 children over the same period.

About Beanstalk

  • Beanstalk is a national charity that provides one-to-one literacy support to children who struggle with their reading.
  • The charity recruits, trains and supports volunteers to provide one-to-one literacy support in primary schools.
    Beanstalk’s trained reading helpers transform the lives of the children they support, turning them into confident, passionate and able readers.
  • In the last school year the charity helped over 11,000 children across England, in over 1,400 schools, with the help of over 3,000 reading helpers, ensuring children have the skills and confidence to reach their true potential.
  • By 2020-21 Beanstalk aims to help 30,000 children every year, with 8,000 volunteers.

About Reading Matters

  • Reading Matters is a registered charity and not-for-profit social enterprise which began in 1997. Since then, the charity has supported tens of thousands of young people.
  • In 2016/17, Reading Matters supported 6,497 children and young people and on average increased reading ages by 13 months in just 10 weeks.
  • The charity runs a range of programmes: Reading Mentors, Reading Leaders, Reading Families and Reading Teams. They provide schools with a resource box of reading materials that will engage and encourage reluctant readers.
  • Reading Matters’ social mission is to help children, young people and adults to reach their potential by becoming confident and enthusiastic readers.

More info:

www.beanstalkcharity.org.uk

and check out the Bookseller article: https://www.thebookseller.com/news/beanstalk-and-reading-matters-merge-664681

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What I’ve Learnt from working at Atwood Tate as Administrator & Social Media Coordinator

Working at Atwood Tate
What I’ve Learnt working as Administrator & Social Media Coordinator at Atwood Tate

In July 2016 I joined Atwood Tate as a maternity cover Administrator. In October I was made permanent as the Administrator and Social Media Coordinator. Sadly I am now leaving the company which I have absolutely loved working for, for an exciting opportunity working as a Marketing and Publicity Executive at a Trade publishing house.

As Administrator, and later Social Media Coordinator, I have learnt a lot during my time at Atwood Tate! From the different publishing sectors to the true cost of London commuting!

Upon leaving University in May 2016 I hectically began applying for numerous jobs and work experience placements within publishing and had first-hand experience of the difficulty of breaking into this industry.

Publishing is an increasingly competitive world to enter into and often candidates requires a lot of experience to get an entry-level job. With work experience placements often over-subscribed and most not covering more than expenses, it was sometimes difficult to add extra work experience to my CV. Instead I developed my skills within blogging, social media and coding which eventually led to me gaining a few interviews.

If you want to learn more about how blogging, YouTubing and Coding/HTML can help make your CV’s stand out take a look at our blog posts on these subjects!

I was lucky enough to come across a vacancy at Atwood Tate and attended an interview for the role. I was later offered the position of Administrator and jumped at the opportunity to be working within the publishing industry on the recruitment side of things.

Working in recruitment is a great way to learn about the industry and to network with a lot of people working within it.

Ultimately, I’ve decided to return to my roots within publishing, but during my time at Atwood Tate I have learnt many things about this industry and have had a great time doing so:

What I’ve Learnt Working at Atwood Tate:

  • There are more sectors in publishing that just Trade, Academic and Educational. This includes: B2B (Business to Business), STM (Science Technical and Medical) and Professional publishing. These sectors are just as exciting as the three I knew about prior to joining, and are a great place to build experience and learn more about publishing.
  • Also, there are a lot more roles within publishing than just editorial. A lot of people are looking to enter Editorial positions when they first apply for publishing roles, but Publicity, Sales, Rights and many other job roles are just as engrossing and immersive within the industry
  • Recruitment Companies, such as Atwood Tate, are a great resource for job-hunters, both experienced and entry-level. Even if Atwood Tate have no available roles for entry-level candidates we have created resources for entry-level candidates across our social media and on our website. This includes fortnightly Q&As, a work experience resources page, quick email responses to inquiries and regular helpful blog posts on job applications, temping and skills development.
  • Publishing Recruitment is just as immersive as working in a publishing house. When I first joined Atwood Tate I wanted to meet people within publishing, and develop my networking abilities. Since starting I have gone to numerous Society of Young Publishers event, attended the London Book Fair and LBF seminars, gone to the Borough Book Bash and generally communicated with publishing houses and publishers via our Social Media accounts
  • And last but not least, one of the best things I’ve learnt from working at Atwood Tate: helping people to find a job within publishing is a fantastic feeling.

Not only have I met some great people outside of the office but I have also made some fantastic friends within the company as well – mostly from bringing in copious amounts of cake!

One of the best bits of feedback we can receive from candidates and clients alike is about how friendly they find the staff at Atwood Tate, and it’s true! I may be biased but the main aim of everyone at Atwood Tate is to get our candidates their dream jobs, and clients their dream employees. And to give advice during the times that we’re waiting for those jobs to come in.

I’m leaving Atwood Tate in the full knowledge that if I ever need a new job in future I will be in safe hands when coming to them.

I also leave behind our new social media which I have had the great responsibility and joy of developing, including our YouTube Channel and Instagram. I leave this in the capable hands of our new Administrator and Social Media Coordinator: Andrew Willis.

You’ll be hearing more about Andrew in the coming week! So watch out for that.

For now I leave Atwood Tate with huge thanks for the wonderful opportunities and experiences I have had. And best of luck to our new Administrator Andrew, who’s going to do a wonderful job!

 

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BookTube 101: An evening with Sanne Vliegenthart & BookMachine

BookTube 101

BookTube 101

On Wednesday our Administrator and Social Media Coordinator Ellie attended the BookMachine’s event: BookTube 101.

BookTube is the name given to the community of book vloggers on YouTube (channels dedicated to the discussion of books) and booktubers are the given name of the vloggers that run these channels.

One such booktuber is Sanne Vliegenthart, of BooksandQuills, who was the guest host of the event. She came to discuss the relevance of BookTube to the publishing industry and how she has developed her own BookTube channel and career.

Starting out in 2008 Sanne created her channel BooksandQuills to discuss things she was interested in. At the time she was studying for an English Literature degree, so she wanted to discuss what she was reading. Sanne also covered other topics, as BookTube was not officially a ‘thing’ until around 2011.

In 2009 she began to focus more heavily on books when she took part in the 50 Book Challenge, a challenge to read 50 books in one year. Audiences were responsive to her videos documenting her progress, and she found her subscribers growing due to the challenges popularity.

Now, in 2017, her channel has over 160,000 subscribers, 11 million views and she has created over 600 videos since 2008.

BookTube & Publishing

Sanne links her successful BookTube channel to her getting a career in publishing. She currently works as the Social Media producer for Penguin Random House, and she previously worked for Hot Key Books, an imprint of Bonnier, as Digital and Social Media Manager.

With social media being a part of our everyday lives and new jobs within publishing being created specifically to accommodate and utilise it, a background in booktubing and blogging are a growing way to break into the publishing industry. You can read our post on using blogging to get into publishing here.

Along with discussing the benefits of booktubing on her career development, Sanne also discussed the relevance of BookTube to publishers looking to develop their marketing, sales and publicity approaches.

For most booktubers in Britain, booktubing is a hobby that is done alongside a full-time job or education. Out of the close community of booktubers Sanne is a part of, none of them are professional full-time YouTubers. But many of them do have links to the publishing community.

Some are social media producers at other publishing houses, others are writers, booksellers, freelance editors, marketing assistants and more.

BookTube & Publicity

Sanne then discussed how BookTube can help publishing companies publicise books and journals, similarly, if not more so, than blogs and blog tours.

  • YouTube videos often create more comments and discussions than blog posts do.
  • They can last longer than a blog post – imagine writing a 10 minute video into a cohesive blog post.
  • It’s easy to share content and they’re visually appealing
  • Subscribers of booktubers can develop a personal connection with the booktuber, through reading tastes, professionalism and consistency of posting.

BookTube & Sales

As an example, Sanne has procured, roughly, £45,000 for the publishing industry, selling books through an affiliate link to the Book Depository.

She pointed out that this figure is from one affiliate link only. She cannot monitor the amount her subscribers are spending buying books from her recommendations in shops, online or via subscriptions to websites such as Audible.

The topic turned from how booktubers can help to how they should be approached. Since booktubing is a hobby most booktubers will only read and discuss books that they themselves want to read. Sometimes they are sent books and publicity materials from publishers, but rarely accept anything unsolicited. Often publishers will request to send a book to a booktuber, but there is no requirement that they discuss the book on their channel unless they want to.

It is clear from Sanne’s channel and statistics alone that BookTube is incredibly popular and a worthwhile consideration to the development of the publishing industry.

Our YouTube Channel

We are very interested in the topic of BookTube and hearing some tips for starting a channel from Sanne, as we ourselves have a YouTube channel. So far we have created videos on topics such as How to get a Job Interview in PublishingHow to get into Academic Publishing and shared a vlog of our time at the London Book Fair 2017, among others. We’ve recognised the potential of YouTube for the publishing industry and are utilising it for recruitment.

We want to say a big thank you to BookMachine for holding the event, and to Sanne for hosting! Ellie had a great time!

For more information contact us on any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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BookMachine London: All about BookTube

Our administrator Ellie will be attending this Bookmachine event on the 29th March, at the Library in St Martin’s Lane. Learn all about BookTube from an established BookTuber
Sanne Vliegenthart. It is sure to be an interesting evening filled with fascinating new facts and fun!

Let us know if you’re attending by contacting us on any of our social media accounts: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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How to use LinkedIn to get a Job

LinkedIn

How to use LinkedIn to get a Job

LinkedIn is a professional social media site, with over 225 million users, which is a great place to start when beginning a job search.

Whilst not social in the sense of funny meme sharing and night out gossip, is a great way to socialise and network with potential employers and recruiters. It is also a great hub for learning more about different industries and networking.

If you attend an event, for example the London Book Fair, and meet a publishing professional in the queue of a café, get their name and link up with them afterwards. You never know where a future encounter might take you, and having a LinkedIn account can make it so much easier!

As such, the first step is to create a LinkedIn account!

Whether you’re looking for an apprenticeship, internship, part-time, temporary or permanent role, having a LinkedIn account can be really beneficial.

Not only can you create your own LinkedIn account for people to find, you can also follow other people’s accounts and company profiles. Such as our own: Atwood Tate.

We regularly post our latest jobs, competitions, blogs, and industry news on our account so it is worth following! You can also follow our recruitment consultants and have a one-to-one way of communicating and access to their latest jobs in their sector of job type.

For example: Karine Nicpon handles Editorial roles in B2B and will post these jobs to her LinkedIn account.

But firstly, you need your own account.

Here are some simple tips on how to make your account as professional as possible and use LinkedIn to get a job:

  • Make sure your profile photo is clear and professional. Do not upload a picture of yourself on your latest night out or of striking a silly pose. Use a photo that shows your whole face, is un-blurred and looks professional but approachable.
  • Add your experience – LinkedIn is more social than a CV so you don’t have to be as thoroughly detailed or structured, you can describe your roles with simple bullet points or a brief description. You can also write in first person rather than third.
  • Use keywords – some recruiters search by specific words, for example we search for the keyword Publishing and, depending on roles we have in, editorial or publishing sales etc. But you can also include keywords like office experience, languages, B2B, admin experience etc
  • Fill out everything! If you have volunteer experience, however small, add it, along with any accomplishments you are proud of and any skills or hobbies that you have.
  • Include your contact details – these will only be available to people that you accept as followers, but a recruiter will need them to get in contact with you about potential jobs.
  • Upload a CV! As a recruiter this is really important to us, as this will hold more details on your education, background and specific skills. It is also what a recruiter will need for when they later put you forward for jobs!

Once you have made your LinkedIn account as professional as possible you can follow people!

Companies:

  • Follow companies you are interested in for information on their business, where they’re based, their company size and any jobs that they are advertising.
  • Follow the companies that you have worked for in the past, however small. Link them to your work experience categories to give more information to future employees!
  • Follow recruitment companies for information on their latest jobs! You can see our current jobs on LinkedIn here.

Contacts:

  • Contact friends, colleagues and family to link up as contacts. Not only can you stay in touch (it is a social network after all) but you can also endorse each other’s skills! This lets companies/recruiters know that you’re telling the truth when you say you have experience in HTML, French and Networking, for example.
  • Follow old colleagues and tutors/teachers for potential referrals for future jobs. The more contacts you have the better.
  • Follow recruitment consultants or HR recruiters at potential companies you would like to work for. They might get in touch directly in future.

Now you’ve created your profile and linked up with people you can start applying for roles advertised on companies LinkedIn pages. You can even search for potential roles in the search bar and get job alerts to let you know when a job fitting your preferences and previous job searches becomes available.

We hope that this post helps you with your job search! And we hope that you’ll come and follow us on our LinkedIn account for more details and news on all our latest jobs, our business and industry news. You can also follow us on our other social media accounts: Twitter, Facebook, YouTube or Instagram.

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Our Plans for the London Book Fair & Giveaway

Plans for London Book Fair & Giveaway

Our Plans for the London Book Fair & Giveaway

With the London Book Fair officially one week away we thought we would share with you our plans for the event!

Every day of the fair there will be at least 5 members of the Atwood Tate staff milling around Olympia, either at our stand, in the Ivy Club or around the fair.

When we are at our stand (3B26, in tech) and we’re not deep in conversation , feel free to approach us. During the week we do have meetings throughout the day so we may not always be available to chat – as much as we’d like to!

You can still take a look at our stand however! We will be bringing a lot of things with us:

  • Leaflets – with all our information and details about our services
  • Printables – Are you looking for work experience? Or useful information about getting into publishing? We will have some print outs available with some resources for you!
  • Sweets – One of the most important things at any book fair: sugary sustenance.
  • Current Vacancies – We’ll have a list of all of our current vacancies at our stand as well.

We will also be on social media a lot! Not only during the London Book Fair but this week as well!

Competitions

This year we are also running competitions! The first is a Giveaway: Win £100 worth of vouchers by liking and sharing our LinkedIn page! Starting from tomorrow (8th March) and ending on the 16th of March, the last day of the London Book Fair, you could win a great prize! And all you have to do is follow our LinkedIn page and share the post on Twitter. For more entries you can also share and like our LinkedIn posts on this Giveaway!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Also, if you follow us on Twitter you may have noticed a certain competition we’re starting for this year’s Book Fair!

The first person to come up to us, on each day of the London Book Fair, and says: ‘Atwood Tate we hear you’re great’ will win a £10 book voucher!

The earlier you get to our stand (3B26) and say this, the better. We’ll announce when someone has won the prize each day on our Twitter feed. However please respect the consultants work; if they’re in a meeting at the stand please don’t disturb them. The fair is an industry event after all.

Other Plans

On Tuesday 14th you may spot our Administrator Ellie wandering around with a camera as she films a London Book Fair Vlog for our YouTube channel! Be sure to say hello and tell us your thoughts on the London Book Fair if you get a chance!

On Thursday 16th, between 2:30pm-5:00pm, two of our Consultants: Karine Nicpon & Alison Redfearn will be attending the Career’s Clinic. You can bring your CV and have a quick 5 minute chat with them about the next step in your career!

All in all we have a lot going on!

Make sure you follow us across all our social media, and use the hashtag #LBF17, to keep up to date with what is happening at the Fair. As well as receive advice, hints and tips on what to bring and see at the London Book Fair: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

We can’t wait to meet you all!

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5 Reasons Why You Should Attend the London Book Fair 2017

London Book Fair 2017

5 Reasons Why You Should Attend the London Book Fair 2017

The London Book Fair 2017 is fast approaching. It will be happening on the 14th-16th of March at the beautiful Olympia in Hammersmith.

It is an opportunity for all those in the publishing industry to meet and discuss publishing, with the main focus of the fair being on the literary agents as they sell book rights in the International Rights Centre. This is an event to learn, observe and discover the latest trends within publishing, with a lot of publishing’s finest under one roof.

The exhibition floors will be filled with publishers, agents, recruitment consultants and writers. It is a brilliant place to mingle and learn more about the publishing industry if you any, or wanting to be, any of the above.

Here are 5 Reasons why you should attend the London Book Fair:

  • There is a Careers Clinic and recruitment agencies attending

Bring your CV and book a place at the Career’s Clinic. At the clinic you get 5 minutes to speak to a specialist recruitment agent who can discuss jobs and offer advice, and even take your CV for further review.

We will be attending the Careers Clinic, as we did last year, with our consultants offering advice. More info on this over the next few weeks!

Recruitment agencies will also have their own stands throughout the fair, at which you can approach them for a chat.

  • Networking Opportunities

Yes, that dreaded word appears again. The London Book Fair has a busy atmosphere, but it is the perfect place to meet people within the publishing industry, and ask questions where suitable.

Each publisher within the industry will have their own stand, but there are other opportunities to network as well: seminars, meetings and clinics. Also queues! The queues for food can sometimes get quite large but you can always strike up a conversation at this point. Be open and friendly.

For more advice on Networking check out this blog post our temps team administrator Michael did!

  • Seminars & Meetings

The London Book Fair also includes seminars and discussions for anyone to attend. Some require paid tickets, but most are free – but you do need to book beforehand! Check out the LBF Insight Guide for a look at all of the seminars at the event!

You could attend the Byte the Book Networking event on the 14th of March or attend the Careers Clinic. Or, if you’re a writer, book a meeting with the Society of Authors.

  • The Publishing Sectors

The London Book Fair is the perfect opportunity to learn more about all the sectors of publishing. From Academic to B2B, Trade to Print and Production.

From viewing the stands to networking with the stand-holders, this is a great opportunity to learn more about the publishing industry as a whole. With over 2000 exhibitors over three days this is a fascinating experience for anyone looking to enter the publishing world.

  • Attend with Friends

This is a great event to attend with fellow publishing candidates, be it already in publishing or looking to enter the industry. It can be a lot easier to mingle with others when you have a friend to go with you, and the event is quite social.

You can always grab a coffee or some food at one of the many cafes, discuss the event, walk around together or attend seminars together. It is much a social event as it is a professional one.

Make sure you book your LBF ticket in advance though. Tickets cost £40 per person for the three day fair. Book here!

So there are 5 reasons to attend the London Book Fair 2017. We will be releasing more information as we creep nearer to the event! And we can’t wait to see you at the Careers Clinic. Don’t leave it too long before you book your place at the clinic, these places tend to go quickly!

Want to learn more about the London Book Fair? Check out there website or follow them on Twitter. They will be live tweeting throughout the day, as will many other publishers, so keep an eye on social media over the week.

You can also follow us on social media to stay up to date: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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