Tag Archives: Social Networking

Guest Post: What will defy, embrace or become a disruption in scholarly publishing?

We are thrilled to bring you a guest post on our blog from Jessica Edwards, as she reflects her thoughts on the BookMachine’s recent event, ‘Scholarly Publishing: Crossing the Rubicon’.

What will defy, embrace or become a disruption in scholarly publishing?

Thoughts from BookMachine’s latest event

‘Scholarly Publishing: Crossing the Rubicon’

By Jessica Edwards

The Jam Factory, Oxford, 7 September 2017

Image courtesy of Michael Belcher, Marketing Manager at Ingenta

Image courtesy of Michael Belcher, Marketing Manager at Ingenta

Last Thursday, as I trundled slowly towards Oxford (kicking myself for accidentally catching a slow train – who knew there were quite so many stations between Reading and Oxford?!) I wondered what was in store at BookMachine’s latest event, ‘Scholarly Publishing: Crossing the Rubicon’. Arriving at The Jam Factory, I scanned the room of busily-networking people and took a deep breath. Although I’ve now worked in publishing for over 2 years, and always enjoy chatting to inspired publishing-types, a few seconds of panic always descends when, turning from the table of beverages, glass in hand, the reality hits that one must shuffle into a group at random and strike up a conversation. Thankfully, I was lucky enough to approach two lovely individuals from Atwood Tate – Claire Louise Kemp and Alice Crick. Not only were they extremely friendly, our conversation (and Claire Louise spotting me scribbling notes during the panel discussion) led to the suggestion, offer, and composition of this blog post!

My name’s Jess Edwards, and I’m currently Marketing Executive at Gale, a Cengage Company. Gale creates digital resources (from journal and eBook databases to digital archives) for academic, special, school and government libraries worldwide. Consequently, when the advert for BookMachine’s scholarly publishing seminar popped into my inbox, it not only looked interesting but extremely relevant to my current position, and I quickly purchased an early-bird ticket!

There were four engaging speakers on the panel. Phill Jones, Director of Innovation at Digital Science, a company who invest and nurture research start-ups creating software to aid scientific research; Charlie Rapple, Sales & Marketing Director and co-founder of Kudos, a platform which increases research impact by driving discovery and facilitating the sharing of academic work; Byron Russell, Head of Ingenta Connect, a publisher-facing content management system that enables publishers to convert, store and deliver digital content; and Duncan Campbell, Director of Digital Licensing and Sales Partnerships at John Wiley & Sons, ranked ninth on the Publisher’s Weekly list of the world’s 50 largest publishers, 2017. Bringing together speakers (and an audience) from both large, established publishers and newer, often technology-based start-ups, led to some interesting discussion on the relationships between the two; the responsibilities of each; and whether one or the other is best placed to cope with the disruptive forces in publishing – or themselves be disruptive.

The discussion generated by the panel was wide-ranging and insightful, broadening my understanding of the challenges, relationships and roles in publishing beyond my own. It made me think more deeply about the hugely influential and clearly disruptive issues looming over the industry, as well as the ideas and innovations which currently exist around the edges of the industry, meeting niche requirements today, but which could, in time, disrupt, engulf or evolve the whole publishing landscape.

Insights and topics of discussion that I found particularly intriguing include:

  • The symbiotic relationship between start-ups and established publishers

The opening discussion about innovation in publishing included the suggestion that it is more difficult for established companies to innovate – something easier for new-comers. However, there was also an agreement that innovation is a necessity at every tier of the industry. The conversation moved on to the common practice of publishers supporting innovation elsewhere; encouraging and funding the technological start-ups often responsible for floating fresh new ideas. The arguments were put forward that these start-ups rely on funding and support from the publishing establishment, who had a responsibility to nurture them. Yet the establishment in turn rely on the innovation of the start-ups for their own development and evolution – often acquiring them down-the-line as part of their innovation strategy – thus the relationship could be described as cyclical or symbiotic.

  • Piracy V. Green OA

Although I was relatively familiar with the term ‘Open Access’, I was not with ‘Green OA’. (This was one of the things I was inspired to google following the event, and consequently am now aware of both green and gold OA!) Reference to green OA was made in discussion of the threat and disruptive nature of piracy in the publishing industry. There was also consideration of how attitudes towards sharing have changed over time – and where the fine line now sits between piracy and OA. It was suggested that in the past, if one academic was to email an article to another based elsewhere, it would have been seen by publishers as an infringement of copyright. Now, perceptions of sharing have evolved, with the industry instead taking an observational approach; monitoring such behaviours with the intent to better understand the market. The distinction was made, however, and agreed upon unanimously by the panel, that sharing on a need-to-know basis remains different from mass-uploads by networks such as Sci-Hub. Yet it was also recognised that such ‘dark’ enterprises are also examples of innovation forcing the publishing industry to evolve. The disruptive impact of such ‘dark’ innovation was nicely summarised by Phill Jones: ‘It has forced the agenda, but at the same time, it’s not the solution.’

It’s testament to how packed, insightful and content-rich the discussion was that I could go on…! However, this blog post is already heading towards classification as a tome, so I won’t elaborate on the other interesting discussions, though will squeeze in that these included the impact of new business models such as ‘Netflix for journal articles’(!), how a trend towards trans-disciplinary research and developments in research evaluation will affect publishing, and the future of Discovery Systems.

All-in-all, I highly recommend anyone interested in learning more about a particular area of publishing, or the industry in general, goes along to a BookMachine event. Absorb what the experts have to say – it will almost certainly come in useful in the not-so-distant future – and meander your way into a conversation during the networking drinks – who knows what connections you’ll make, you might even end up writing a blog post for somebody!

A little like Where’s Wally…spot me in the stripey top! Image courtesy of Michael Belcher, Marketing Manager at Ingenta.

A little like Where’s Wally…spot me in the stripey top! Image courtesy of Michael Belcher, Marketing Manager at Ingenta.

Nb. All views are my own, and not those of Gale, Atwood Tate, or BookMachine. If I have misrepresented any of the discussion or speakers’ arguments, this is down to my own misunderstanding.

Twitter @Jessica2Edwards

https://www.linkedin.com/in/jessicaedwards1/

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SYP Panel Talk: “How to assert yourself in publishing”

SYP Panel Talk: “How to assert yourself in publishing”

On Tuesday night, I went to my first SYP event, which was a panel talk on “How to assert yourself in publishing”. On the panel were: Roly Allen (@roly_allen) a Publisher at Ilex, part of Hachette UK,  Bryony Woods (@BryonyWoods)  Literary Agent at Diamond Khan and Woods,  Ailah Ahmed (@ailahahmed), Commissioning Editor at Little, Brown, part of Hachette UK, and Pinelopi Pourpoutidou, Head of Foreign & Digital Sales at Michael O’Mara Publishing.

Discussion ranged from topics such as knowing when it is time to speak up in meetings, what confidence is, and whether maternity-leave affects career progression, and what can be done to change this. Here are 7 of the top tips to take away from the evening.

 

On Applications…

1. Keep your cover letters short and specific to the job

Cover letters do not need be very long. Half a side of A4 will suffice. Make it short and sharp and to the point. Outline your key skills and how they make you suitable for the requirements of the role. Investigate the company, know what they do. Say why you want to work for them and why they should want you to work for them.

2. Sell yourself in your interests.

The interests section in your CV is your chance to sell yourself, and gives the company an idea of you as a real person. Be honest, but also be professional. Do you play sports, play in a band, part of an activity/ interest club, been travelling? Make sure you share!

 

On Confidence…

3. Fake it till you make it

Few people can start in a role and have complete confidence right away. It is learnt over time as you acclimatise to the role. Being nervous as you start out is normal, but if you are not confident, you can just pretend you are. The panel suggested Amy Cuddy’s method of ‘Fake it Till You Make It”. Watch her TED Talk on it here: https://www.ted.com/talks/amy_cuddy_your_body_language_shapes_who_you_are

The panel also suggested Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg as a resource particularly for women with tips and advice on how to build confidence and how to be a successful leader in the workplace.

 4. Loudness isn’t confidence- knowing what you’re talking about is.

Don’t think that you will come across as confident just by talking louder and being brash and confrontational. Being quieter and more introverted doesn’t mean that you are less effective or less valuable. What is important is preparing your facts before you talk and share. An idea that you have investigated and can support with facts and realistic costings is much more useful than something unprepared, said loudly.

5. Form a support network, even if just an informal one.

One tip suggested, especially to benefit people from minorities with less representation in the industry, was to form a support network with people in the industry who have come from a similar background. Either in your company, or out wider out into the industry; find someone or a group of people who are at a similar stage to you, and people you feel you can confide in, and ask advice from, who you can meet up with once a month over a coffee.

6. Don’t be afraid of speaking up in meetings, but know when to stop.

If you have an idea that is relevant, share it. But if you are told it will not work, then know when to stop.

 

On Asking for More…

7. When to ask for a pay rise

The panel suggested that you should perhaps start thinking about asking for a pay rise after a year into a role. An employer should not think less of you for asking, and the worst that they can say is no. If they do reject your request, ask if you can review this decision in 3 to 6 months. They suggested that you should pick your time to ask also based on what the situation of both you and your company are. If the company is making cut backs, it might not be the correct time to ask. But if you have had a period of success (as opposed to just one success), then you should ask. Your request should make a case for your worth to the company, and why you deserve this rise.

 

This was a fascinating talk, and all the speakers were enthusiastic and entertaining. Thanks to the speakers and The SYP for hosting the event!

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What I’ve Learnt from working at Atwood Tate as Administrator & Social Media Coordinator

Working at Atwood Tate
What I’ve Learnt working as Administrator & Social Media Coordinator at Atwood Tate

In July 2016 I joined Atwood Tate as a maternity cover Administrator. In October I was made permanent as the Administrator and Social Media Coordinator. Sadly I am now leaving the company which I have absolutely loved working for, for an exciting opportunity working as a Marketing and Publicity Executive at a Trade publishing house.

As Administrator, and later Social Media Coordinator, I have learnt a lot during my time at Atwood Tate! From the different publishing sectors to the true cost of London commuting!

Upon leaving University in May 2016 I hectically began applying for numerous jobs and work experience placements within publishing and had first-hand experience of the difficulty of breaking into this industry.

Publishing is an increasingly competitive world to enter into and often candidates requires a lot of experience to get an entry-level job. With work experience placements often over-subscribed and most not covering more than expenses, it was sometimes difficult to add extra work experience to my CV. Instead I developed my skills within blogging, social media and coding which eventually led to me gaining a few interviews.

If you want to learn more about how blogging, YouTubing and Coding/HTML can help make your CV’s stand out take a look at our blog posts on these subjects!

I was lucky enough to come across a vacancy at Atwood Tate and attended an interview for the role. I was later offered the position of Administrator and jumped at the opportunity to be working within the publishing industry on the recruitment side of things.

Working in recruitment is a great way to learn about the industry and to network with a lot of people working within it.

Ultimately, I’ve decided to return to my roots within publishing, but during my time at Atwood Tate I have learnt many things about this industry and have had a great time doing so:

What I’ve Learnt Working at Atwood Tate:

  • There are more sectors in publishing that just Trade, Academic and Educational. This includes: B2B (Business to Business), STM (Science Technical and Medical) and Professional publishing. These sectors are just as exciting as the three I knew about prior to joining, and are a great place to build experience and learn more about publishing.
  • Also, there are a lot more roles within publishing than just editorial. A lot of people are looking to enter Editorial positions when they first apply for publishing roles, but Publicity, Sales, Rights and many other job roles are just as engrossing and immersive within the industry
  • Recruitment Companies, such as Atwood Tate, are a great resource for job-hunters, both experienced and entry-level. Even if Atwood Tate have no available roles for entry-level candidates we have created resources for entry-level candidates across our social media and on our website. This includes fortnightly Q&As, a work experience resources page, quick email responses to inquiries and regular helpful blog posts on job applications, temping and skills development.
  • Publishing Recruitment is just as immersive as working in a publishing house. When I first joined Atwood Tate I wanted to meet people within publishing, and develop my networking abilities. Since starting I have gone to numerous Society of Young Publishers event, attended the London Book Fair and LBF seminars, gone to the Borough Book Bash and generally communicated with publishing houses and publishers via our Social Media accounts
  • And last but not least, one of the best things I’ve learnt from working at Atwood Tate: helping people to find a job within publishing is a fantastic feeling.

Not only have I met some great people outside of the office but I have also made some fantastic friends within the company as well – mostly from bringing in copious amounts of cake!

One of the best bits of feedback we can receive from candidates and clients alike is about how friendly they find the staff at Atwood Tate, and it’s true! I may be biased but the main aim of everyone at Atwood Tate is to get our candidates their dream jobs, and clients their dream employees. And to give advice during the times that we’re waiting for those jobs to come in.

I’m leaving Atwood Tate in the full knowledge that if I ever need a new job in future I will be in safe hands when coming to them.

I also leave behind our new social media which I have had the great responsibility and joy of developing, including our YouTube Channel and Instagram. I leave this in the capable hands of our new Administrator and Social Media Coordinator: Andrew Willis.

You’ll be hearing more about Andrew in the coming week! So watch out for that.

For now I leave Atwood Tate with huge thanks for the wonderful opportunities and experiences I have had. And best of luck to our new Administrator Andrew, who’s going to do a wonderful job!

 

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Our Plans for the London Book Fair & Giveaway

Plans for London Book Fair & Giveaway

Our Plans for the London Book Fair & Giveaway

With the London Book Fair officially one week away we thought we would share with you our plans for the event!

Every day of the fair there will be at least 5 members of the Atwood Tate staff milling around Olympia, either at our stand, in the Ivy Club or around the fair.

When we are at our stand (3B26, in tech) and we’re not deep in conversation , feel free to approach us. During the week we do have meetings throughout the day so we may not always be available to chat – as much as we’d like to!

You can still take a look at our stand however! We will be bringing a lot of things with us:

  • Leaflets – with all our information and details about our services
  • Printables – Are you looking for work experience? Or useful information about getting into publishing? We will have some print outs available with some resources for you!
  • Sweets – One of the most important things at any book fair: sugary sustenance.
  • Current Vacancies – We’ll have a list of all of our current vacancies at our stand as well.

We will also be on social media a lot! Not only during the London Book Fair but this week as well!

Competitions

This year we are also running competitions! The first is a Giveaway: Win £100 worth of vouchers by liking and sharing our LinkedIn page! Starting from tomorrow (8th March) and ending on the 16th of March, the last day of the London Book Fair, you could win a great prize! And all you have to do is follow our LinkedIn page and share the post on Twitter. For more entries you can also share and like our LinkedIn posts on this Giveaway!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Also, if you follow us on Twitter you may have noticed a certain competition we’re starting for this year’s Book Fair!

The first person to come up to us, on each day of the London Book Fair, and says: ‘Atwood Tate we hear you’re great’ will win a £10 book voucher!

The earlier you get to our stand (3B26) and say this, the better. We’ll announce when someone has won the prize each day on our Twitter feed. However please respect the consultants work; if they’re in a meeting at the stand please don’t disturb them. The fair is an industry event after all.

Other Plans

On Tuesday 14th you may spot our Administrator Ellie wandering around with a camera as she films a London Book Fair Vlog for our YouTube channel! Be sure to say hello and tell us your thoughts on the London Book Fair if you get a chance!

On Thursday 16th, between 2:30pm-5:00pm, two of our Consultants: Karine Nicpon & Alison Redfearn will be attending the Career’s Clinic. You can bring your CV and have a quick 5 minute chat with them about the next step in your career!

All in all we have a lot going on!

Make sure you follow us across all our social media, and use the hashtag #LBF17, to keep up to date with what is happening at the Fair. As well as receive advice, hints and tips on what to bring and see at the London Book Fair: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

We can’t wait to meet you all!

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Welcome to the team David!

There are more then just Editorial, Marketing and Publicity jobs in Publishing and for that reason we’re are thrilled to welcome David – the newest member of the Atwood Tate team who shall be handling all our  IT & Data roles!

david_13118-2714-burtonphoto-co-uk

David is a Senior Consultant at Atwood Tate and has extensive experience in both the publishing and recruitment industry with a key focus on business areas such as: Digital, Technology, Change & Transformation, Information Security and Data & Analytics.

He started his publishing career as a Corporate Project Leader for Swets Information Services who were a subscription and information agency that worked on behalf of a multitude of publishers. He then went on to work for NLA media access as a Senior Account Manager where he provided collective licensing solutions in order to protect publishing industry’s copyright. In June 2014 he left the NLA to pursue a career in recruitment and worked as a consultant for a Digital, Technology and Change & Transformation agency before joining Atwood Tate.


You can contact him here:

Telephone: 020 7034 7850
Email: davidmartin@atwoodtate.co.uk
Or on LinkedIn

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Team Update

It’s an exciting time to be in recruitment right now, and that is evident by the changes in the Atwood Tate line-up!

We’re delighted to announce that Claire Louise Kemp and Karine Nicpon have both been promoted to Senior Consultants!

Christina Dimitradi, currently coCD photo 2015vering consultant Catherine Roney’s maternity leave, has been made permanent so she’ll continue working with us when Catherine returns in January. Christina handles all Editorial (Trade, Academic, Educational, Professional, Associations, Charities and Societies), Rights, International Sales and Contracts roles.
christina@atwoodtate.co.uk
020 7034 7902
Linked in

 

Lucy Slater

Lucy Slater has been promoted from Administrator to Consultant, and is now covering Production, Production Editorial, Data, Research and Analytics, Digital/IT, Design, Distribution and Operation roles.
lucyslater@atwoodtate.co.uk
020 7034 7821
Linked in

 

 

Ellie LinkedIn imageEleanor (Ellie) Pilcher is our new Administrator, currently covering Katie Hargreaves maternity leave until she returns in January. Get in touch with her for any queries regarding your profile, updates or registering with Atwood Tate.
eleanorpilcher@atwoodtate.co.uk
020 7034 7900
Linked in

 

You can find more about our team at our Meet the Team page and for a full list of all our contact info, here’s a link to our Organisation structure which also tells you who covers what job roles/sectors in our London and Oxford offices.

Don’t forget to Link in with your Consultant to keep track of new job vacancies, industry news and events.

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The Beginners Guide to Networking in Publishing (and other industries)

Networking. It’s not many people’s favourite activity but we all have to do it. Charly Salvesen-Ford of the Independent Publishers Guild (IPG) and I recently gave a “Masterclass on Networking” to the SYP Oxford, and below are the highlights of what we talked about.

But why do I have to network?
Publishing is a very collaborative industry and it is very relationship driven. Networking can get you anything from free books, to book club members, to new business opportunities, to job offers.

  • People are more likely to remember you if they’ve met you and can put a face to the name.
  • People are more likely to remember you, and therefore recommend you to others if they’ve spoken to you in real life
  • People are more likely to remember you, and therefore be willing to help you if they’ve met you in real life.

Ok. Quick! Tell me what I need to know in 30 seconds.

  • Be brave and fake it till you make it – I bet 90% the people in the room are just as nervous as you are! Seriously, people are often just as shy as you are, and being nice to them in real life, will make them feel better about themselves and therefore good about you.
  • Baby steps – challenge yourself to get just one business card. Voila! You have networked. Next time will be easier and you can get two.
  • Practice – The more you do it, the less scary it will get. I promise.
  • Just do it!!! – Networking is one of those things that you learn by doing.

Maybe a little bit more detail…
Even the most extroverted people know how intimidating walking into a room full of people can be… and a room full of people that all seem to already know each other is a million times worse! Quick tip for that? Get there for the start of the event as opposed to “fashionably late” and cliques won’t have had time to form.

Claire Louise and Charly’s Top Ten Tips for Networking Success

Before the event

  1. Bring business cards, and be ready to accept them too.
    If you’ve got no business card, bring a biro or a Sharpie – that way you can improvise if necessary, or can jot notes to remind of you of things that you will associate with the new contacts. Note: We say biro or sharpie, rather than ink pens because some cards are glossy and hard to write on. Keep spares in your name badge holder/lanyard if you have one.
  2. Look at the delegate list.
    You will often have access to a list of who is at an event. If you have a quick look over it, it may help you recognise people in the room. There may also be specific people that you’d like to be introduced to – why not ask an organiser (or an experienced industry person) if they can point them out or introduce you. You will sometimes know who is going to an event beforehand, in which case it’s worth doing some prep.
  3. Engage online if it is encouraged by the event.
    For example, IPG events love to use hashtags – it’s a good icebreaker for before an event “I’m going to this, do say hello!” and to start virtual conversations that can transfer to real ones if you find the person you are tweeting alongside.

During the event

  1. Just say hello.
    It can be difficult to know how to open a conversation but it’s usually absolutely to fine to start with the basics – say hi and smile! First impressions really count, so a smile can be a winning accessory – even to people you don’t speak to on that occasion.
  2. Give yourself a target of people to meet / cards to obtain.
    Remember though ultimately it’s quality not quantity. Make it a challenge and a game and get invested. These don’t have to be big challenges. For example, if you are super nervous, set yourself the goal of one conversation. Little steps. Next time it won’t be as daunting.
  3. Ask questions
    If the networking follows a talk/conference, ask what they thought about a panel. People like to be asked questions about them and what they do – it’s often an interesting and useful conversation springboard if you ascertain how long someone has worked in the industry.
  4. Speak to people you wouldn’t normally speak to.
    You never know when something/someone’s going to be important and it would be boring if we only spoke to people like ourselves. (It can be tempting to hang around with a group of friends. You will see your friends again, this is the time to work on your career.)

After the event & general thoughts

  1. Do your follow up!
    If you exchanged cards, send a “nice to meet you” email a day or so later. If you said you would send them something, SEND IT!
  2. Don’t forget to tweet the event (using the hashtag) to say “great event” afterwards. A thank you is also always appreciated – events take a lot of organisation! (And if you write a blog follow-up, again, mention the hashtag and organiser in a tweet with the link)
  3. Don’t panic.
    Everyone is human and we don’t all get it right all the time. That’s fine.

Do you have any further tips or networking tricks? Do let us know in the comments, or jump into the conversation on Twitter (@atwoodtate, @kempcl, and @ipghq).

clk-new Charly Ford

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BookMachine: Next Five Years in Publishing

bookmachine-strap

Last week saw another fantastic BookMachine event in Oxford. Co-hosted by the Oxford Publishing Society, the event was sponsored by PLSclear and featured a talk from Michael Bhaskar.

Michael spoke eloquently and passionately about the “Next Five Years in Publishing”. To get a flavour of what he talked about, do read the recent Q&A he did with BookMachine.

The night started with a whistle stop tour of 500 years of publishing history – as an industry, we have been consistently innovative and at the forefront of a lot of major change. Michael then focused in more detail on the past five years, which have all been about consolidation in the market place and the discoverability of content.

So what will the next five years bring us? The themes of consolidation and problems (and solutions) around discoverability will remain key, but Michael feels strongly that we need to look to curation and helping people find the good stuff in the sea of content. Quality, not quantity should be our mantra.

I was left with the impression that, whilst no one knows the answers to how exactly we should go about doing things, there is a lot to be hopeful for in the future of our industry as we continue to innovate and experiment.

Michael is the Co-founder and Publishing Director of Canelo, a new digital publisher. Previously he was Digital Publishing Director at Profile Books and Serpent’s Tail and has worked at Pan Macmillan, a literary agency, an economics consultancy and a newspaper amongst others.

What were your take-away’s from the night? Do let us know in the comments, or jump into the conversation on Twitter (@atwoodtate & @kempcl)

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BookMachine

On Tuesday 9th June Karine and I attended the London BookMachine event about the rise of mobile reading and short stories. It was a great opportunity to meet other publishing professionals, catch-up with old colleagues and hear some expert views on bite-sized content.

We really enjoyed listening to the two speakers.

Louie Stowell was first. She is a Writer and Editor at Usborne and has written over 25 children’s books, including fiction, non-fiction, novelty and traditional stories. She spoke about Fiction Express; a new and interactive platform for publishing fiction e-books where readers determine the plot, in real time, as the stories are written. Louie is an author for Fiction Express and is currently writing The School for Supervillains, a story about a girl who is training to be a supervillain but secretly wants to be a superhero.

Sheila Bounford was second. She is currently Interim Managing Director at Inpress Books and in 2012 founded Off the Page Ideas, a consultancy which works with independent publishers. Over the last few years she has been involved in various digital projects and she gave a very interesting talk about the combination of short form publishing and live broadcasting events.

The event was hosted by Evie Prysor-Jones, Content Lead at Optimus Education and was sponsored by Spineless Classics. If you have the chance to attend any events from the BookMachine week (8th-16th June) in London, Oxford, Cambridge, Brighton and Barcelona, do not hesitate!

IMG_5832

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Scholarly Social

Alison and I headed over to King’s Cross on 19th May for the latest instalment of Scholarly Social.  It was our first time at this event and we’d really recommend it to anyone working in and around academic / STM publishing.  It was a really well organised (and free!) event with a great range of speakers plus the chance to network with your peers.

As they say, it’s ‘an open and collaborative space to share ideas and make connections. We host social gatherings where you can make new connections with people involved in scholarly communication or catch up with old friends.  You don’t represent your organisation, just your individual self, and everyone connected to scholarly communication is welcome, including publishers, librarians, researchers, consultants, intermediaries, and students.’

This event was in association with #futurepub (from Overleaf) who have hosted #futurepub 5 as part of the Pint of Science Festival.  We had the pleasure of 6 x 5 minute talks from mainly start-up companies focussed on the future of scientific publishing.

Thanks to Bernie FolanGinny Hendricks for organising. Contact Scholarly Social

Speakers were:

Eva Amsen, Community Strategy Manager for Faculty of 1000

F1000 has just launched F1000Workspace, where researchers can collect, cite and discuss scientific literature with their colleagues.

James Harwood, Co-founder of Penelope (automated manuscript screening)

Penelope is an automated tool that helps authors improve their work before submitting to a journal. Penelope scans manuscripts for common reporting errors and suggests improvements along with links to relevant resources. In doing so, she makes sure that all manuscripts meet journal standards before landing on an editor’s desk.

Richard Smith, founder of Nowomics

The new Nowomics website allows scientists to ‘follow’ biological terms to create a personalised news feed of new papers. With inline abstracts, search and altmetrics it aims to make content discovery simpler than sifting through email alerts and tables of contents.

Nowomics

Sabine Louët, founder of SciencePOD (raising the profile of research, via on-demand popular science articles)

SciencePOD delivers Science Prose On-Demand by translating complex scientific ideas into articles written in an accessible language. It then publishes this high-quality content in a slick magazine format and distributes it widely.

Science pod

Karl Ward, principal engineer at CrossRef (CrossRef’s REST API: All-you-can-eat Scholarly Metadata)

CrossRef’s REST API provides free and open search of metadata covering over 70 million journal articles, books and conference proceedings. Find out how anyone can build services using CrossRef’s metadata, including basic bibliographic information, funding, award and license data for published works and more.

Cross ref

Giorgos Georgopoulos – product, delivery, and business development at Futurescaper

Futurescaper is a tool that connects people’s thinking on complex issues, and is being used to help coordinate teams of researchers working on long-term, multi-author projects. We were given an example of how a team of analysts used Futurescaper to make sense of 300+ citations, collected over 3 months by 24 environmental researchers, in just a day.

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