Tag Archives: SYP

SYP Panel Talk: “How to assert yourself in publishing”

SYP Panel Talk: “How to assert yourself in publishing”

On Tuesday night, I went to my first SYP event, which was a panel talk on “How to assert yourself in publishing”. On the panel were: Roly Allen (@roly_allen) a Publisher at Ilex, part of Hachette UK,  Bryony Woods (@BryonyWoods)  Literary Agent at Diamond Khan and Woods,  Ailah Ahmed (@ailahahmed), Commissioning Editor at Little, Brown, part of Hachette UK, and Pinelopi Pourpoutidou, Head of Foreign & Digital Sales at Michael O’Mara Publishing.

Discussion ranged from topics such as knowing when it is time to speak up in meetings, what confidence is, and whether maternity-leave affects career progression, and what can be done to change this. Here are 7 of the top tips to take away from the evening.

 

On Applications…

1. Keep your cover letters short and specific to the job

Cover letters do not need be very long. Half a side of A4 will suffice. Make it short and sharp and to the point. Outline your key skills and how they make you suitable for the requirements of the role. Investigate the company, know what they do. Say why you want to work for them and why they should want you to work for them.

2. Sell yourself in your interests.

The interests section in your CV is your chance to sell yourself, and gives the company an idea of you as a real person. Be honest, but also be professional. Do you play sports, play in a band, part of an activity/ interest club, been travelling? Make sure you share!

 

On Confidence…

3. Fake it till you make it

Few people can start in a role and have complete confidence right away. It is learnt over time as you acclimatise to the role. Being nervous as you start out is normal, but if you are not confident, you can just pretend you are. The panel suggested Amy Cuddy’s method of ‘Fake it Till You Make It”. Watch her TED Talk on it here: https://www.ted.com/talks/amy_cuddy_your_body_language_shapes_who_you_are

The panel also suggested Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg as a resource particularly for women with tips and advice on how to build confidence and how to be a successful leader in the workplace.

 4. Loudness isn’t confidence- knowing what you’re talking about is.

Don’t think that you will come across as confident just by talking louder and being brash and confrontational. Being quieter and more introverted doesn’t mean that you are less effective or less valuable. What is important is preparing your facts before you talk and share. An idea that you have investigated and can support with facts and realistic costings is much more useful than something unprepared, said loudly.

5. Form a support network, even if just an informal one.

One tip suggested, especially to benefit people from minorities with less representation in the industry, was to form a support network with people in the industry who have come from a similar background. Either in your company, or out wider out into the industry; find someone or a group of people who are at a similar stage to you, and people you feel you can confide in, and ask advice from, who you can meet up with once a month over a coffee.

6. Don’t be afraid of speaking up in meetings, but know when to stop.

If you have an idea that is relevant, share it. But if you are told it will not work, then know when to stop.

 

On Asking for More…

7. When to ask for a pay rise

The panel suggested that you should perhaps start thinking about asking for a pay rise after a year into a role. An employer should not think less of you for asking, and the worst that they can say is no. If they do reject your request, ask if you can review this decision in 3 to 6 months. They suggested that you should pick your time to ask also based on what the situation of both you and your company are. If the company is making cut backs, it might not be the correct time to ask. But if you have had a period of success (as opposed to just one success), then you should ask. Your request should make a case for your worth to the company, and why you deserve this rise.

 

This was a fascinating talk, and all the speakers were enthusiastic and entertaining. Thanks to the speakers and The SYP for hosting the event!

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The Kim Scott Walwyn Award Ceremony 2017

On 10th May two of our consultants, Helen and Lucy, will be attending the Kim Scott Walwyn Prize 2017 ceremony.

The Prize, which recognises the professional achievements and promise of women in publishing, is open to any woman who has worked in publishing in the UK for up to seven years. Founded in 2003, the Prize honours the life and career of Kim Scott Walwyn, who was Publishing Director at Oxford University Press and who died in 2002 at the age of 45. The Prize is run in partnership with the Society of Young Publishers (SYP) and the Publishing Training Centre (PTC). The winner of the Prize receives £1000, sponsored by the SYP, and a two-day training course of their choice at the PTC. Shortlisted candidates also receive a one-day training course courtesy of the PTC and a book token courtesy of National Book Tokens.

The keynote speaker for this years event is Mary Beard. It is a set to be a fantastic evening and we can’t wait to attend and see who wins!

You can more about the prize and this years shortlist here.

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SYP Practical Workshops: How to be a Booktuber

How to be a booktuber

SYP Practical Workshops: How to be a BookTuber

On Monday evening our Administrator and Social Media Coordinator Ellie was lucky enough to attend the first of the Society of Young Publishers (SYP) Practical workshops. The topic was:

How to be Booktuber.

The workshops are a new yearly series of workshops occurring once a month, about a different topic each month. For a full list of the upcoming workshops and how to apply to take part in one take a look at the SYP’s page here.

This workshop was run by an established Booktuber: Leena Normington, aka justkissmyfrog on YouTube.

Leena has previously worked as a Creative Producer for Pan Macmillan, running their BookBreak series on YouTube, and currently works for the Telegraph. She has been a Booktuber for 7 years and was happy to share some tips and practical advice about starting a BookTube channel.

Held at Hachette, the evening consisted of a lot of laughter, discussions and a task of pitching a YouTube video around a certain book.

The workshop was fully attended by 10 people so everyone got a chance to speak, ask questions and generally chat about the different ways YouTube can helping the publishing community within publicity, marketing, sales and more.

Here are our three top tips we took from the event:

  • Affiliate links on YouTube channels

Affiliate links are links to website and booksellers online where viewers of YouTube videos can purchase any of the products, in this case books, discussed within the video. Not only are these links great for promoting books but they’re also fantastic for monitoring how many and what type of books are being bought by the audience. Through this information a Booktuber can monitor the tastes of their audience and adapt to suit them, as well as prove that BookTube sells books!

  • YouTube & Google Analytics

Views are not everything…no, really! On YouTube when you post a video you can go to the Creator Studio and view your analytics for your channel and each individual video. Whilst getting 1000 views on a video would be fantastic, it’s better if the watch time of the video (the average length of time a person spent viewing the video) is higher or equal to the length of the video. If you have 1000 views, but the viewers only spent an average of 30 seconds watching a 4 minute video, this actually shows that this video wasn’t as successful as you thought. If a video has only 100 views but was watched for the entirety of its length this was a more successful video.

  • Tone & Topic

A strong point to take away from this workshop was the need for a consistent tone and topic across all social media channels within business. If a business has a Twitter, Instagram, newsletter etc, when building a new YouTube channel you need to build a channel that matches the established social media in tone and topic. It would be jarring to create fun, bright videos about different topics if the company’s other social media is very serious and focused solely on one topic.

BookTube is a growing social media platform, one which we ourselves have begun, and has been featured recently at several events. You can read about the BookTube event ran by BookMachine last month here.

This workshop was a lot of fun and left Ellie with a lot of information to take away; from software advice to campaign planning. It it was a fantastic evening with Leena and other SYP members and we can’t wait to hear about, and maybe attend, some of the next workshops!

For more information the workshops be sure to follow the SYP on twitter at @SYP_UK and also follow the official hashtag for the workshops: #SYPpubskills

Do you like the sound of BookTube or the SYP workshops? Let us know on any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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SYP Literary Bingo

A few of our consultants are happy to be attending the SYP (Society of Young Publishers) Literary Bingo event on the 12th April! It’s sure to be a fun night, filled with laughs and book prizes and we can’t wait to attend!
Let us know if you’re going on any of our social media accounts! We’d love for you to come and say hello!

The evening is sure to be great fun and at £3 for members and £6 for non-members it’s an affordable evening out!

To book tickets to the event you need to go to the Eventbrite page here!

You can contact us here: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Post-LBF SYP Social with Publishing Interns

On the 15th March a group of SYP (Society of Young Publishers) and the representatives of the Publishing Interns (@PubInterns) will be gathering at the Cumberland arms near the London Book Fair for a chat and a glass of wine.

This is the perfect place to network with your fellow interns, work experience publishing people and also others within the publishing field.

A free event which is guaranteed to be a great night it is worth attending. Some of our consultants may pop in for a chat as well.

Make sure you follow us on twitter, @AtwoodTate, to keep up to date with what is happening.

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The SYP London AGM 2017

SYP London AGM 2017

On Monday the 23rd of January our Administrator Ellie will be attending the Society of Young Publishers (SYP) London AGM meeting at the Stationers Hall. It is an event where the committee of the SYP from 2016 say goodbye and the committee for 2017 is introduced. Along with the hello and goodbyes is also a summary of SYP’s events and news from the previous year and a chance to catch up with and meet new members.

The event is open to all and is free, but only members of the SYP can vote for the new committee. So come along and say hello to us if you attend! We’d love to meet some of you!

Let us know if you are attending on any of our social media accounts: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

See you there!

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Where to Find Work Experience in Publishing

where-to-find-work-experience-in-publishing

For the last two weeks we have been running a Twitter Q&A every Wednesday and most of the questions have been about ‘Where to Find Work Experience in Publishing’

In a previous blog post about Work Experience we mentioned most companies require a minimum of 3-6 months’ work experience within publishing before considering applications for part-time or permanent entry-level roles. This is because Publishing is an incredibly popular business and entry-level roles are heavily applied for! Some of the larger publishers can get between 20 and 200 applications for any entry-level position, with editorial roles being the most popular!

If you really want to make your CV stand out then you need to get some work experience.

Where to Find Work Experience in Publishing

  • Atwood Tate, as a company, do not handle work experience placements but we do have a Temps Team! Our temp’s team can help you get a paid temporary job, starting tomorrow in some cases, all you need have is a small amount of admin skills or equivalent. Temps are paid weekly and can have work lasting from a fortnight to three months. To get in contact with our team and learn more about how they can help you, email Michael, their team administrator: michaellawlor@atwoodtate.co.uk
  • Twitter: A lot of people say they struggle to use twitter to find work experience but it’s all about following the right people and making connections online! For example: If you want to work at a Literary Agency follow the Literary Agents and the company pages! They are more likely to post work experience placements on twitter to gather interest from people who are clearly interested in them! It is the same for publishing companies, particularly smaller publishing houses. You can also follow certain pages which are dedicated to helping people finding jobs and work experience within publishing, for example: @PubInterns and @BookJobsUK and specific job pages for publishing houses and academic presses!
  • Facebook: Another Social Media site. A lot of the bigger named trade publishing houses have specific Work Experience Vacancies pages on Facebook. They advertise anywhere from fortnightly to yearly with opportunities for interns and work experience, from yearlong schemes to two week placements! It is well worth seeing which publishing houses are on Facebook and finding their Work Experience pages!
  • BA/MA Courses: This is not always a viable option, but if you want to learn more about publishing in an academic way or within a learning environment you can apply for multiple BA/MA courses all over the UK. Some come with guaranteed Work Experience placements as part of the modules. You get a broad overview of Publishing within these courses and will usually graduate with many skills across multiple publishing sectors and job roles. They will not guarantee you a full-time publishing position straight away upon graduation though.
  • Company Pages: Nearly all companies will post Work Experience schemes on their websites. We recommend you keep an eye on smaller, more independent, publishing houses across all sectors from trade to B2B to gain some experience. These schemes are normally less over-subscribed and in some cases can last longer than an average fortnight placement.
  • Blogs: Much like Twitter there are several blogs dedicated to finding Work Experience within publishing. To name a few: Diary of a Publishing Professional and Publishing Interns. They release weekly to monthly bulletins of all of the latest entry-level roles and work experience placements going across Book Publishing, Magazines, B2B and Newspapers across the whole of the UK.
  • The Society of Young Publishers: Open to anyone with under 10 years publishing experience. There is an annual fee to join the society but you are given access to a private jobs board with work experience and entry level roles, as well as tickets to publishing events where you can network with other publishing professionals and more! If you want to know if Networking is helpful read our blog on the subject here! It is well worth joining the SYP if you are sure you want to work within publishing.
  • Jobs Boards: Last, but not least, jobs boards. You can get job alerts from many of these jobs boards which you can tailor to the positions that you want, i.e. Publishing or B2B or Editorial etc. There are also specific job boards to Publishing as well as the standard job boards. Example: Guardian, Reed, PublishingScotland, Oxford Brookes Publishing Board, Indeed, The Bookseller and more!

We hope that these tips will help you know where to find work experience in publishing!

If you have any more questions comment below or join us for our next/last Q&A of 2016 on Wednesday 21st December at 12:30pm on Twitter. Use the hashtag #AskAtwood or tag @AtwoodTate!

Let us know what you think on our social media sites too: Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, LinkedIn or Instagram.

 

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OPuS/Bookmachine/SYP Christmas Party

OPus/Bookmachine/SYP Christmas Party

Our consultants Lisa Smars and Claire Louise Kemp are very excited to be attending the OPuS, Bookmachine & SYP Christmas Party this year! Held at the Jam Factory in Oxford it is set to be a very fun, very festive, evening!

It is the perfect evening to mingle with everybody across the publishing industry, just a plain good night out.

Let us know if you’re going on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram and be sure to say hello to our colleagues if you see them!

Merry Christmas!

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Break into Publishing: Networking

Breaking into publishing: Networking

Common Symptom #2: Networking

Speak Softly and Carry a Big Book

You’re at a fancy venue. You have a glass of wine in your hand, maybe some food or maybe only the fond memory of food at this point, you’ve been standing here so long, watching, waiting, trying to find an in, an opening, a shot – that’s right, you’re networking.

Networking in publishing can be a fairly daunting prospect, especially for young graduates. It’s difficult to be assertive when you don’t claim to be an expert on anything this early in your career. And if you’re quiet and retiring, you’re not exactly going to make a lasting impression. But it’s a worthwhile endeavour so it’s important to try.

As we’ve previously covered in our work experience blog, publishing is a saturated market so you will always have to run a little faster, climb a little higher, work just that little bit harder, to make any headway. It can be bitter pill to swallow but it comes back to how badly you want it.

The important thing to remember is that, believe it or not, networking in the publishing world can actually be quite fun! It’s a chance to mingle with like-minded people who know your struggle and are usually quite helpful in offering advice or tips. A memorable conversation can go a long way. What starts as an observation about the venue or your journey there can lead to suggestions and introductions you could not have come across in any online search you might try. Take a business card, take two! Take as many as you can until you have a winning hand. And if you have your own cards, even better.

Events

There are great events happening all the time, from Christmas parties to pub quizzes, hosted by a variety of societies and institutes, all of them masters at bringing people together for a night of fun and games while also creating an ideal space for networking.

And don’t worry, if networking doesn’t come naturally to you, remember that, like everything it gets easier the more you do it. You don’t need to own the room, you can be yourself and let your passion show through. Think of talking points in advance to help break the ice, familiarise yourself with publishers and who their authors are so you can show you know their company and what they’re about.

Next step? Sign up to newsletters, check out websites like the SYP, Bookseller, BookMachine, then pencil in some dates – who knows, it’s possible you could bump into one of our staff making the rounds and we might be just the person who can help you!

If you have a question in need of answering, about networking or other work experience related questions, let us know on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or LinkedIn!

 

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SYP: How to Make a Bestseller 2016

SYP: How to Make a Bestseller 2016

On the 26th of November our Senior Recruitment Consultant Karine Nicpon will be attending the SYP: How to Make a Bestseller Conference.

It is sure to be an insightful day and one that we can’t wait to hear all about! If you’re attending let us know via Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or Instagram and be sure to say hello to Karine if you see her!

 

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