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How to Use Blogging to Get into Publishing

How to use Blogging to get into Publishing

How to Use Blogging to Get into Publishing

How relevant is blogging to publishing? You’d be surprised. Blogging is not a hobby you should start specifically to enter publishing, but if you have one: mention it!

Blogging is a growing hobby, and a new career choice, in the 21st century. Having a blog gives people a platform to discuss what they want and voice their own opinions. But it also gives you the opportunity to work with others across multiple fields of industry. Not to mention develops skills in your own time which can help you in the long-run.

If you’re just starting out and are looking for an entry-level role within publishing, blogging is a great skill to have! So long as you have some work experience to back it up, blogging can tip the balance on whether or not you get an interview or even a job!

There are many different types of blogs, and all can help you gain many skills, from Coding, Design, Marketing, networking and more! But within the Publishing industry specifically book blogging is a very relevant skill!

Book blogging, or booktubing (video blogging), gives you the chance to voice your opinions about books and the latest book trends. A book blogger can write reviews, top ten lists, trend-reviews and more and each of these topics has some relevance to publishing. If you’re an established book blogger you may even work with publishers; taking part in blog tours, hosting giveaways and Q&As and attending book events.

Through communicating with publishers through these events, and voicing your own opinions, shows a potential employee that you understand the industry. You can see trends, converse with professionals and work to deadlines in a creative and independent manner.

This is relevant to all sectors, be it Trade or B2B, and all roles from IT, Editorial, Publicity and more!

It also shows an interest outside of work, which suggests to a future employer that you are a reliable candidate with a keen sense of the publishing industry.

Whether you’re a book blogger or not; blogging is skill to add to your CV!

Here some things you can highlight to show how blogging is useful to you:

  • Commitment: The longer you’ve been blogging the better. This shows commitment and creative thinking, and also proves that you can work well independently.
  • Networking: If you’ve worked with brands or publishers mention it on your CV. Not only does it prove your communicational skills, but also shows an understanding of the industries you mention. This is particularly good if the brands are relevant to the job you’re applying for.
  • Social Media and SEO abilities: Have you got 1000 twitter followers because of your blog publicity? Mention it! Do you understand SEO? Mention it!
  • Coding: If you’ve altered your HTML yourself or have learnt about it then put that down as a skill. For more information about HTML and how to do it, look at our series of posts here!
  •  Design: Did you design your blog, or make your own graphics/headers? Have you got original artwork or worked with others to create artwork? Put it on your CV.

There are so many relevant and useful skills which can be a real pull to employers when looking at CV.

Make sure you have other work experience to back up your blog experiences, but also be sure to highlight the skills you have learnt through blogging! It could mean the difference between getting a job interview and getting a job when you’re first starting out!

Need any more tips about how to enter publishing? Take a look at our Work Experience & Entry-Level Resources!

For more advice, or if you have any questions, get in touch via any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Writing a Winning Sales CV

Writing a Winning Sales CV

Writing a Winning Sales CV

Creating the perfect CV is one of the most important things for any job seeker. But particularly so for sales people. Where a journalist can submit samples of their writing or a designer a portfolio of work, as a sales person your CV has to do most of the talking.

Having reviewed many CVs in my time in recruitment, I’ve come to identify what makes an effective and well written CV for sales roles. There are many simple bits of information that candidates miss out which may affect their chances of being considered for a job.

So you don’t make the same mistake, I’ve compiled some guidelines of key things to include!

Whether a second jobber or an experienced sales manager you should include:

  • Sales figures – Where possible you should include details of revenue achieved, targets met, sales made etc… Always make sure they are honest and that you can back them up if asked about them in an interview.
  • Achievements – You should give examples of particular successes you’ve had, whether securing a large deal, signing on a new client…
  • Products & clients – If you’ve worked for a large organisation do specify what area of the business or publication you worked on or what type of products you were selling. It’s also useful to know who you were selling to or specific regions you dealt with.
  • Languages – If you have professional competency in more than one language and would be willing to use it at work, tell us! It might be just what a particular client is looking for.
  • Travel – If you are used to travelling a lot and enjoy it, it’s good to know and if applying for field sales positions, do mention if you have a clean driving licence and car.
  • Line management – If you’ve managed staff, say how many and whether they were office or field based.

Last but not least, being a successful sales person is often very much about your personality so don’t be afraid to let this show on your CV. Also remember that you need strong communication skills and to be well presented and professional so your CV should demonstrate this.

For more general advice on CV layout, you should visit https://atwoodtatepublishingjobs.co.uk/advice/.

If you have any questions get in touch via social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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New Year, New Goals 2017

New Year, New Goals

New Year, New Goals

January is a tough month. The Christmas buzz has worn off and the bills for the holiday period hang over everything. It’s a tough time to think about future prospects but concentrating on your next step can be a great way to shake this feeling off.

But now that it’s finished, it might be time to consider a new job. Our clients have returned from the holidays, looking to fill roles that were put on hold before the Christmas break. Check out our website to see the latest roles we’re working on and if you see something of interest, get in touch with the relevant consultant. If you don’t see anything you like, drop us a line anyway. Let us know you’re looking and what it is you want. The first step is the hardest but once you’ve started the search, everything else will fall into place.

For those considering a move into publishing, why not consider temping? 2016 saw an increase in temporary roles, following the post-Brexit scare. Temp roles are a great way to join a company that is looking for additional resources but who regularly discover along the way that they need someone on a permanent basis. The work isn’t going away so guess what? Neither are you!

For more information on our current temporary roles, contact Kellie Millar, our Temps/Freelancers Manager, or Alison Redfearn. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram where we post our latest roles or sign up for Job Alerts on our website and receive a notification as soon as they go live.

So, with January done and dusted, it’s time to really tackle the new year! Take a risk, find the job you really want to be working in, even if it’s only a contract role, and make 2017 a game-changer!

Make sure you share this post so we can help others too! And get in touch via our website, phone or any of our social media accounts:  on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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Counter Offers in the Publishing Industry

Counter Offers

Counter offers

In today’s candidate driven publishing jobs market, good candidates will sometimes be spoilt for choice. We are increasingly seeing counter offers made by companies who are reluctant to lose talented staff to competitors or other sectors. Although it’s a flattering position to be in, making a decision can be very tricky, especially as you’ll usually be given only a short space of time to weigh up your options. Some people do end up making the wrong decision and return to job hunting after a few months, so we want to help you avoid that!

If you do find yourself considering a counter offer, here are some things to think about:

  • What were your reasons for applying for a new job in the first place? Does your current employer not offer the progression you want? Or are there problems with the company itself? Will any issues resolve themselves in time or still be there in a few months?
  • Will this new role offer you increased responsibility and duties which will be more rewarding than what your current employer is offering? Maybe the role works with a more exciting product or offers line management or international travel which you’ve always wanted to do.
  • Counter offers often take the form of a salary increase but if your current employer has promised you increased responsibility or perks of some kind, you should question if it is realistic that these will materialise. We’ve seen cases where they haven’t so it’s advisable to get any changes to your job agreed in writing before you agree to stay on.
  • If your prospective new employer cannot meet the salary your current employer has counter offered, it’s worth asking about future career progression and when you will be eligible for a salary review and/or bonus. It might be within a few months or after your probation period.
  • It’s also worth enquiring about benefits. Some employers offer very generous benefit packages and the perks they offer can be the equivalent of a few thousand pounds a year.

We hope these tips help. And do remember that one of the advantages of applying for jobs through a recruitment agency such as Atwood Tate is that we act as your representative and can negotiate offers on your behalf. So, if you’ve applied for a job through us and need advice about what to do or have questions you wouldn’t feel comfortable asking a prospective employer yourself, then we’re here to help.

If you have any questions, further tips or experiences you’d like to share with us, contact us via TwitterFacebook, LinkedIn or Instagram.

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How to Register with Atwood Tate

how-to-register-with-atwood-tate

New Year, New Job?

Why not use Atwood Tate to help you find your next job in publishing. To take the first step you need to register with us!

This is entirely free and can be done online on our website!

Register Online

Click on the Login/Register button in the top right hand corner and then click on ‘Not Registered?’ This will take you to our registration page where you can fill out all of your personal details, your preferences and upload your CV.

You can choose up to three preferences, from a list, for three separate areas:

  • Job Type: i.e. Editorial, Sales or Marketing
  • Job Sector: i.e. STM, MedComms or B2B
  • Job Location: i.e. London, Oxford or International

You can also choose whether or not to receive Job Alerts. Job Alerts are tailored to your preferences, so if your top preferences are Editorial in a B2B sector if a job becomes available you will be alerted via email.

**Please note that when you sign up for Job Alerts you may receive several immediately. This will stop after a few hours, as these will be our current jobs that suit your preferences.

Also, our Job Alerts are not tailored to salary so some roles may be too senior or too junior for you depending on your experience. Please note that you are able to search for jobs by salary on our website Job search though. If you are confused or interested in any of these roles but are unsure of whether they are suitable, each email comes with the contact details for the consultant covering that position. Feel free to phone or email them for more details.

In addition, when you register with us you set yourself a password which will allow you to login to your profile page and make edits, such as upload a new CV, turn on/off your job alerts etc. Please make a note of your password upon registering. Your username will be your email address.

Once you have filled in your details and uploaded your most recent CV, press Register.

The Next Step

Your profile will have been added to our system and our Administrator Ellie Pilcher will review it within a couple of days. She will either send your details to the most relevant consultant:

For example:

Or, Ellie will respond herself to clarify any questions we may have, or to suggest that you gain more work experience. The majority of our clients require at least 3-6 months’ worth of in-house publishing experience before considering candidates for a role. Although our Temps desk may consider applicants with less experience who have admin skills, for temp roles.

Don’t be disheartened if we respond suggesting you need to gain more experience. We have resources we can point you to, to help you gain that experience! And we’re happy to answer any questions about Work Experience on our social media accounts. For more in-depth information please contact Ellie at: eleanorpilcher@atwoodtate.co.uk.

Office Registration

Once a profile has been reviewed by Ellie and forwarded to one of the consultants, that consultant will then get in touch with you! They may invite you to register with us in person, at either our London or Oxford office depending on your immediate location. We can also do registrations via the phone and Skype.

When you have registered online you are registered with Atwood Tate. You do not need to meet us in person before you can apply for our roles, you may do so immediately.

When a consultant organises to meet with you in person it is to gather more information about your past experiences, your skills and where exactly you would like to work within publishing. You and the consultant will sort out a time and date suitable for you both and directions/information will be given before your registration.

It is an informal registration, but you can use the experience as a practice interview if you like. You will be asked to complete a couple of forms, including our Equal Opportunities form, and you’ll be required to bring along two forms of identification: a passport &  your National Insurance number.

The meeting shouldn’t take more than 20-30 minutes, but it is your opportunity to ask us any questions you have, to highlight where you want to go within your career and to discuss any vacancies that we currently have.

Applying for a Job

Whilst registering with Atwood Tate you can apply for any of our current vacancies. However, if you require more information we can only forward further details, such as salary, location and the company name after you have registered with us, due to client confidentiality.

When you apply your information will be forwarded directly to the consultant handling the position. We recommend that you do not apply for more than three roles at a time, unless you are certain you have the required experience.

If you would like to contact us for more information regarding a job please have the reference number and Job Title to hand. They will be on the job alert or our website.

We will let you know within a few days whether or not you are suitable for the role. Although, if you have not heard from us after two weeks it is unlikely we can consider you for that position.

And there we have it! That is how you register with Atwood Tate!

If you have any further questions about registering with us please contact our administrator via telephone or email. And if you’ve registered with us before but have forgotten your details, or are struggling to access your profile, also contact our administrator.

If you have any immediate questions feel free to contact us via social media or comment down below. Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

We hope that you will register with us soon!

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Blogmas: Day 15

It’s the 15th! 10 days to go! Have you done you’re Christmas shopping today? Well hopefully we have as we’re going to our Christmas Office Lunch at 2pm! But before that we will be posting our 2nd Youtube video on our brand new Youtube Channel! Make sure you check out this one and the previous video, for more tips and tricks to getting into publishing!

Today is also the LAST DAY to enter the BLOGMAS GIVEAWAY we have running! All entries must be in by Midnight tonight! We will release the name of the winner tomorrow so make sure you have entered to have a chance of winning a Huge Stocking of Christmas Goodies! You’ve got to be in it to win it!

Let us know how your Christmas month is going! Sick of Christmas music yet – we’re not! Come and say hello on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn. I’m sure we’ll be posting during our meal too!

Merry Christmas!

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Blogmas: Day 12

On the 12th Day of Christmas Atwood Tate gives to you…

  • A new blogpost! – To be Confirmed! – so keep your eyes peeled!
  • Instagram Advent Calendar – make sure you’re following our Atwood Tate Instagram Account for more tips, tricks and Christmassy Contests!
  • Facebook Infographic – Exclusive information about Publishing and the Publishing Industry! Follow the Atwood Tate Facebook Account for more details!
  • Christmas Giveaway – it is the last week to enter our Christmas Giveaway – entries must be in by Midnight on the 15th of December!

And so much more! Make sure you’re following all of our links to take part in all of our Christmas Events! And let us know your thoughts online: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or Instagram.!

Merry Christmas!

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Blogmas: Day 5

Blogmas: Day 5

Today we have several exciting things going on!

Watch our for a new blog post written by our IT/Data Consultant David Martin!

We will be releasing an exclusive Infographic about the publishing Industry on our Facebook page so make sure you follow us on their to gain some more insight into Publishing!

We will also be carrying on with our Atwood Tate Advent Calendar via our Instagram! Each day we will release an interesting fact about Atwood Tate and the services we provide towards gaining that dream job in publishing!

Lots of exciting things which we can’t wait to share with you! Our Christmas Giveaway is also live via our blog and will be open for two weeks! Time to enter to win the amazing prize of a Huge Stocking of Christmas Goodies!

Joining in with Blogmas this year? Share your posts and come and talk to us over on any of our Social Media: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or LinkedIn! We’d love to say hello and Merry Christmas!

Blogmas

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Break into Publishing: Networking

Breaking into publishing: Networking

Common Symptom #2: Networking

Speak Softly and Carry a Big Book

You’re at a fancy venue. You have a glass of wine in your hand, maybe some food or maybe only the fond memory of food at this point, you’ve been standing here so long, watching, waiting, trying to find an in, an opening, a shot – that’s right, you’re networking.

Networking in publishing can be a fairly daunting prospect, especially for young graduates. It’s difficult to be assertive when you don’t claim to be an expert on anything this early in your career. And if you’re quiet and retiring, you’re not exactly going to make a lasting impression. But it’s a worthwhile endeavour so it’s important to try.

As we’ve previously covered in our work experience blog, publishing is a saturated market so you will always have to run a little faster, climb a little higher, work just that little bit harder, to make any headway. It can be bitter pill to swallow but it comes back to how badly you want it.

The important thing to remember is that, believe it or not, networking in the publishing world can actually be quite fun! It’s a chance to mingle with like-minded people who know your struggle and are usually quite helpful in offering advice or tips. A memorable conversation can go a long way. What starts as an observation about the venue or your journey there can lead to suggestions and introductions you could not have come across in any online search you might try. Take a business card, take two! Take as many as you can until you have a winning hand. And if you have your own cards, even better.

Events

There are great events happening all the time, from Christmas parties to pub quizzes, hosted by a variety of societies and institutes, all of them masters at bringing people together for a night of fun and games while also creating an ideal space for networking.

And don’t worry, if networking doesn’t come naturally to you, remember that, like everything it gets easier the more you do it. You don’t need to own the room, you can be yourself and let your passion show through. Think of talking points in advance to help break the ice, familiarise yourself with publishers and who their authors are so you can show you know their company and what they’re about.

Next step? Sign up to newsletters, check out websites like the SYP, Bookseller, BookMachine, then pencil in some dates – who knows, it’s possible you could bump into one of our staff making the rounds and we might be just the person who can help you!

If you have a question in need of answering, about networking or other work experience related questions, let us know on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or LinkedIn!

 

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Creative CV Design: the do’s and don’ts.

Creative CV Design: the do's and don'ts

There is lots of advice out there on how to write a good CV for most roles in publishing, and one of the key things you are told is not to put images in and not to get too creative with your layout.

But what if you are designer and images and creative layout are what you do?

So here are some things to help when applying for book designer roles * (this will post mainly talk about roles in Trade book design, but the same hints/tips can be applicable for most sectors).

Before we get started:
Firstly, bear in mind that the CV, cover letter, and your portfolio, all need to work together. Let’s call this bundle “the application pack”. Whist most people will read a cover letter first, you cannot guarantee it won’t be the CV (or even the portfolio) that they start with. So make sure each part of your application pack gives the very best impression of you and your skills that they can.

Next, remember you are a designer. You profession is essentially about imparting information in a visually impactful way. The application pack are the first pieces of your work a potential employer will see. So make sure they are good!

One hiring manager I spoke to takes all the application packs submitted for a particular job, prints them out (in black and white) and spreads them over the meeting room table. All the team then walk around, picking up their favourites. The lesson to take from this? You have to be prepared for the application pack to be viewed in multiple ways – print, screen, colour, black and white… The way to go is A4 and portrait for the CV and cover letter. A4 and either portrait or landscape for the portfolio.

Creative CV Advice

Designers, a “creative CV” can be helpful. However, it can go horribly wrong if it is badly designed or illegible.

  1. Make sure the layout is clean and readable. It is quite common to have a one page CV as a designer, but if you need more room take the full two pages.
  2. Get some personality in there – don’t just use a stock template.
  3. At the same time, don’t go over the top. The CV has a fairly traditional format for a reason. If it doesn’t clearly show your past work experience, education, and relevant skills, then it isn’t doing its job.
  4. Put dates on your CV – dates of qualifications, education, and past employment.
  5. Include a link to your portfolio on the CV. Be prepared for the CV to get separated from the rest of the application pack and handed/emailed round the office. Make it easy for the person viewing just your CV to get to the relevant information about you.
  6. Detail what your responsibilities were in each role: if you were working on covers; did layout; worked with illustrated books, children’s or adults; if you were dealing with illustrators; if you were commissioning freelancers, managing staff, etc. It’s not all about your design skills, you also have other skills to show!
  7. If your CV is in PDF format (standard for designers) and you’ve put in a link to your portfolio, make sure that the link is clickable but also fully visible. Show the person viewing on a screen that you are aware of the possibilities of InDesign. Show the person viewing a print-out that you can design for multiple audiences.
  8. Lastly, (and to reiterate the first point) it needs to be readable! Showing your skills and your creativity is great, but most importantly we need to be able to see at a glance what your experience is. If it is too much of an effort to see what you’ve been up to, the recruiter/HR might give up quickly as they likely have a big pile of CVs to go through.

Portfolio Advice

As a designer, a portfolio is essential to show that you actually have the skills you said you have in the CV.

  1. We highly recommend you have a website version of your portfolio. You don’t have to pay for a personal domain, or for a very elaborate design – unless you want to! There are lots of free services out there – behance, Tumblr, WordPress, Deviantart to name just a few. At a minimum you need a place to display examples of your work. It also shows recruiters you have technical skills in digital software
  2. But you also need to have a curated PDF version of your portfolio ready to supply if asked for it (especially if the advert expressly wants this). This demonstrates your ability to select your work, and to present it in an orderly and beautifully designed way.
  3. Try to make sure this is a fairly small file size because quite a lot of companies limit the size of attachments that can be received. 4MB is a good guide size. It also shows you are capable of choosing the appropriate resolution and image size for your audience.
  4. Avoid dark backgrounds in your application pack – it is still very common to print out applications, and often only on a B&W printer. Dark backgrounds become unreadable really easily.
  5. TAILOR YOUR PORTFOLIO – applying for a print job? Make sure your book/magazine layouts are at the top. Web-design? Feature them first. And be aware of your audience – applying for a job at a children’s publisher? Don’t feature NSFW art!
  6. In the portfolio – both web and PDF – consider using headings (books, web design, product design, adverts) and providing a bit more description about each project (e.g., “I did the full layout for this book for a paying client” , or “This is a self-started cover design to practice” …)

Cover Letter Advice

We’ve talked about cover letters before on the blog and all of that advice still holds true for designer roles. Whilst your portfolio is your main selling tool for design jobs, don’t ignore the cover letter – especially in publishing, where words matter. Take the one A4 page to clearly demonstrate your suitable skills and why you want this particular job at this particular company (and don’t forget to include that link to your portfolio!)

Some general advice

(a.k.a what-not-to-dos from a recruiter who has looked at a lot of CVs from Designers of all levels in the last few months):

  1. Illustration is not book design. Whilst the two are related, and there is often overlap, the two are different skill sets. For example, your experience illustrating gift cards doesn’t necessarily mean you have what it takes to do interior layouts for text books. Know what you are applying for and what your relevant skills/experience are.
  2. And book design can be more than just cover design. You will often need to be able to do layouts, both text and visuals. If this is specified in the job description, make sure your portfolio (and CV) details any relevant experience you have.
  3. Don’t have printers/formatting marks on the edges of your CV/portfolio/cover letter. The first impression these give is that you cannot export a document from InDesign that is suitable for your audience.
  4. Don’t try and take over my screen with Full Screen mode in the PDF. It’s just rude. Most of us live with multiple windows open.
  5. Keep your website simple – see everything I’ve already said about making things easy and readable – (and please avoid Flash if you possibly can!)

And that is it from us. If you have any thoughts or suggestions, please do add them in the comments.

If you have any questions we haven’t answered through our blog or website let us know through anyone of our social media platforms: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or LinkedIn.

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