Tag Archives: tips

Make #BlueMonday into #BrightBlueMonday

Let’s face it: January can be a miserable month. It’s cold, Christmas is over, and the days may be getting longer but you wouldn’t know it when sometimes you go days without seeing the sun at all. This all gave rise to #BlueMonday – allegedly the most depressing day of the year.

#BrightBlueMonday

However, the charity Rethink Mental Health acknowledges that mental health isn’t dictated by the date. Depression can and does affect people every day of the year and this isn’t an issue to take lightly. That’s why they have come up with #BrightBlueMonday, a day to do some good and spread a bit of joy. They suggest that you ‘share a coffee with a colleague, bake something for the office or […] text an old friend to say hello.’

Brightening up a gloomy Monday morning is definitely something we can get behind. It’s also an opportunity to talk about serious issues. Employers: what are you doing to support those with mental health issues in your company? According to Rethink, 1 in 4 of us are affected by mental illness. The charity Mind’s research shows that ‘a culture of fear and silence around mental health is costly to employers’, and it may lead to poorer employee retention, higher absenteeism and lower motivation among staff.Woman smiling under rainbow umbrella. Text reads: 15 January Show your colours on #BrightBlueMonday

So what can employers do to help?

Mind have put together a fantastic collection of resources for businesses here. It’s about being accommodating and offering tailored reasonable adjustments to employees, whether that’s flexible working, providing a workspace that is, for example, quiet or has lots of natural light, or extra support for employees experiencing stress. Another policy could be a buddy system, which offers support outside of a line-management structure.

Charities like Mind and Rethink Mental Health have contributed to the positive cultural shift in attitudes towards mental illness. Companies are also making changes to better support their employees, but there are things we could all do to reach out to our friends and colleagues who may be struggling. So let’s make #BlueMonday into #BrightBlueMonday and spread some positivity today.

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5 Steps to Achieve Your Career Goals in 2018

The beginning of a new year is a good time to reassess where you are in your career and where you would like to be. This is the first stage of achieving your career goals. As we begin 2018, start making a plan of how to fulfil your ambitions and get the most out of your career.

1)   Assess where you currently are compared to where you want to be

Do you know what a typical career ladder in your field might look like? If not, it’s time to do some research. Ask colleagues, contacts, even Google. Or have a browse of Linked In at the people who are doing the job you want to be doing – and see the steps they took to get there. (You might want to check your Linked In privacy settings first if you don’t want them to know you’re looking at their profile!)

We also post infographics showing, for example, a career path for Production, on our Facebook page! Follow us to keep up to date.

2)   Decide on a timeline

It’s not a good idea to be looking for a new job or a promotion if you’ve only just started in a new role. Hiring Managers will be wary of someone who has switched jobs every six months. 2018 might not be the year you get that new, dream job, but that doesn’t mean you’re not moving forward and getting closer to achieving your goals.

Alternatively, it may be that the time is right and you’re ready to move on to new challenges. If that’s the case, get in touch! Register on our website, or if you are already registered, make sure we have your up-to-date CV. We’d be happy to help you in your search!

Speaking of…

3)   Update your CV

Make sure it’s up to date and looks its best. Ask for feedback from people you know. Also see our advice on our blog, like our recent post on the Do’s and Don’ts of CVs.

4)   Brush up on your skills

Are there skills you know would be useful in your career that you haven’t got around to learning? If training opportunities arise in your current job, take them! Or if not, there are great resources available online. Codeacademy is a great free resource to learn to code, including HTML and CSS. Alternatively, if you have the resources, the Society for Editors and Proofreaders (SfEP) offer a number of reputable online or classroom-based courses. Also see what’s coming up from:

5)   Follow through

It’s easy to start the year full of motivation, but it’s hard to follow this momentum through all year. Set yourself deadlines if you’re learning new skills, or print out your career resolutions and stick them above your desk at home so you can see it and be reminded of your goals.

Good luck! We wish you the best in achieving your career goals this year, and hope you’ll be in touch with us if you’re looking for a change so we can help.

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Tips for Video Interview Success

Video interviews are becoming increasingly popular. They may take two forms: they may be conducted via Skype or a similar platform, where you talk in real-time to an interviewer, or they may involve recording answers to pre-set questions without the presence of an interviewer. The former is similar to a face-to-face interview, although there are a few things you should watch out for. The latter may feel more unnatural if you haven’t done one before, but remember everyone is in the same boat and there is nothing to worry about!

Our Top Tips for Success in your Video Interview

  • Make sure you won’t be interrupted. Remember that video interview on the BBC that went viral when the interviewees children came bursting into the background? Interviewers will probably understand if something like that happens, but it’s likely to throw you off your game! Make sure your children, pets, roommates etc. are aware of what you’re doing and are kept out of the room. You don’t want your cat walking all over your keyboard in the middle of the interview!
  • Use a plain background – a plain wall is ideal. You don’t want the interviewer to be distracted by the stack of laundry in the background or your unusual taste in posters.
  • If it’s a Skype interview, make sure you check your webcam and microphone are working well before your scheduled interview time. Call a friend or family member to check, and to help calm your nerves.
  • If you have to record your answers, make sure you practice and listen to yourself back a couple of times. Without the presence of an interviewer, it’s easy to feel awkward and that can come across in the recording. Practising will help you feel more natural.
  • Dress smartly – as you would for a face-to-face interview – and not just on the top half. You’ll feel more in the interview ‘zone’ as well as coming across more professional.
  • Look at the camera, not yourself. This will give an appearance of eye contact, otherwise you’ll appear to be looking down.
  • Relax – you’ve got this!

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Join the Society of Young Publishers’ Committee

Many thanks to the Society of Young Publishers (SYP) for this guest post about applying for their committee! The SYP put on great events for the publishing industry, as well as advertising jobs on their website. We really recommend becoming a member and making use of their services and events. Joining the committee is a great way to learn new skills and meet new people in the industry.

The Society of Young Publishers is open to anyone, of any age, interested in publishing or a related trade – or who is hoping to be soon. From regular panels, workshops and networking events, to our bi-annual all day conference, we host events around the country to explore current publishing trends and debates to help anyone trying to break into the industry or progress within it develop skills and contacts. The SYP committee is made up of volunteering publishing individuals who are in the first few years of their careers. By day, we’re working in publishing and by night we’re volunteering for the SYP, and we’re looking for new committee members to join us for 2018.

Whether you are interested in running events, a role that puts you in contact with experts across the industry; being the voice of the society by managing social media and communications; connecting with the hiring powers of countless publishers by populating on our jobs board; or looking after our members as membership secretary, we’ve got a role for you. We have monthly team meetings and everyone on committee has a voice and can put forward any ideas to improve the society’s offering.

Being a volunteer on the SYP committee entitles you to a free year of membership and the chance to gain experience and contacts within the publishing industry. Making the move into publishing can be scary, however, being on the committee allows you to meet other like-minded publishing professionals, further your publishing experience and form firm friendships.

We have five regional branches across the UK and Ireland, each with their own committee, and a UK committee that manage membership, partnerships and our quarterly magazine, InPrint. Online and exclusively for members, we host a comprehensive Job Database of entry-level and junior positions around the UK and Ireland, as well as The Network a one-stop online forum for members to share tips and experiences with peers, network online, access exclusive content, and connect with industry experts.

We also offer a number of discounts on courses and event tickets and support a number of awards for emerging talent in the industry.

Applications close Friday 15th December. For a full breakdown of roles by region and how to apply please visit the Volunteer page: https://thesyp.org.uk/volunteer-with-the-syp/

See more of our posts about SYP events: https://blog.atwoodtatepublishingjobs.co.uk/tag/society-of-young-publishers/

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Q&A Round Up

Last week was the Publishers Association’s #workinpublishing week! We did a Q&A on Twitter – if you missed it, you can catch up here.

Q: What are the key features recruiters look for in a CV and Cover Letter when recruiting for entry level publishing jobs?

A: Office/admin experience is useful across the board, as are work experience, internships or temp roles in publishing houses! A well written, clear and concise cover letter will also get you a long way.

Q: How important do you think events like literary events and trade shows are?

A: Getting to know people at industry events can be really useful, especially as you can get a feel for different roles and sectors! Having said that, it’s not compulsory, so if you don’t live in London and you can’t get to events easily, don’t worry!

Q: When considering a job offer, it’s not just about salary. What else should candidates be thinking about?

A: Consider what’s important to you – the commute time, flexible working opportunities, training/professional development and company benefits!

Q: What are the most desirable additional tools to have experience in?

A: It depends on the role! But skills like InDesign, social media, general admin/database experience are useful for a lot of publishing work.

Q: I have a lot of volunteer experience with indie pubs, and I’m starting to look for my first publishing job. What would you say my next step should be?

A: Sounds like you should start applying for entry-level roles! You’d also be a great temping candidate, which can sometimes lead to long term roles.

Q: how can I make myself stand out from the hundreds of other graduates when applying for jobs?

A: Make your cover letter stand out by talking about your work experience, any temp roles, admin experience, and extracurricular interests which give you transferable skills!

Q: Are entry level publishing roles hard to come by? I feel like I haven’t seen many around since I graduated.

A: Entry-level roles are VERY competitive so get filled quickly, but a great way to get your foot in the door is through temping! Register with us for temping opportunities and we may be able to help.

Q: What are the most in demand roles in publishing?

A: Most people want to work in editorial, but publishers are always looking for Commissioning Editors and Production Controllers!

Q: What are your top tips for writing a good CV?

A: Be clear and concise, use bullet points, and put most relevant experience at the top! No long paragraphs please! For more tips see our blog post here.

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PPA IPN Conference & Awards 2017

We’re very excited to be attending the PPA IPN Conference & Awards on 28th November – all the details about the day can be found here: http://www.ppa.co.uk/events/ipn2017

Karine and Kellie will be attending the morning conference which is always hugely informative with a great line up of talks including key industry trends, events, GDPR, developing subscriptions and media models of the future. We’re looking forward to the round table – we’ll be hosting the one focussed on Talent (we do know a thing or 2 about this!). 

Good luck to all the nominees – for a full list of the Awards and all those shortlisted check out: http://www.ppa.co.uk/en/Events/IPN2017/Awards We’re pleased to be sponsoring the award for Editor of the Year!

Here at Atwood Tate, we work closely with many independent publishers across a wide range of markets and sectors. Coming from publishing backgrounds ourselves, we understand the culture and ethos of all our clients – one of our favourite parts of the job is getting to know people and building lasting relationships. That and of course working with our candidates to help them find the right job and develop their careers.

We hope to see you at the conference and awards and do get in touch if you have any Talent / recruitment queries in the meantime.

#PPAIPA

Karine Nicpon, Lead Consultant

t: 020 7034 7905

e: karinenicpon@atwoodtate.co.uk

https://uk.linkedin.com/in/karine-nicpon

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Guest Post: What will defy, embrace or become a disruption in scholarly publishing?

We are thrilled to bring you a guest post on our blog from Jessica Edwards, as she reflects her thoughts on the BookMachine’s recent event, ‘Scholarly Publishing: Crossing the Rubicon’.

What will defy, embrace or become a disruption in scholarly publishing?

Thoughts from BookMachine’s latest event

‘Scholarly Publishing: Crossing the Rubicon’

By Jessica Edwards

The Jam Factory, Oxford, 7 September 2017

Image courtesy of Michael Belcher, Marketing Manager at Ingenta

Image courtesy of Michael Belcher, Marketing Manager at Ingenta

Last Thursday, as I trundled slowly towards Oxford (kicking myself for accidentally catching a slow train – who knew there were quite so many stations between Reading and Oxford?!) I wondered what was in store at BookMachine’s latest event, ‘Scholarly Publishing: Crossing the Rubicon’. Arriving at The Jam Factory, I scanned the room of busily-networking people and took a deep breath. Although I’ve now worked in publishing for over 2 years, and always enjoy chatting to inspired publishing-types, a few seconds of panic always descends when, turning from the table of beverages, glass in hand, the reality hits that one must shuffle into a group at random and strike up a conversation. Thankfully, I was lucky enough to approach two lovely individuals from Atwood Tate – Claire Louise Kemp and Alice Crick. Not only were they extremely friendly, our conversation (and Claire Louise spotting me scribbling notes during the panel discussion) led to the suggestion, offer, and composition of this blog post!

My name’s Jess Edwards, and I’m currently Marketing Executive at Gale, a Cengage Company. Gale creates digital resources (from journal and eBook databases to digital archives) for academic, special, school and government libraries worldwide. Consequently, when the advert for BookMachine’s scholarly publishing seminar popped into my inbox, it not only looked interesting but extremely relevant to my current position, and I quickly purchased an early-bird ticket!

There were four engaging speakers on the panel. Phill Jones, Director of Innovation at Digital Science, a company who invest and nurture research start-ups creating software to aid scientific research; Charlie Rapple, Sales & Marketing Director and co-founder of Kudos, a platform which increases research impact by driving discovery and facilitating the sharing of academic work; Byron Russell, Head of Ingenta Connect, a publisher-facing content management system that enables publishers to convert, store and deliver digital content; and Duncan Campbell, Director of Digital Licensing and Sales Partnerships at John Wiley & Sons, ranked ninth on the Publisher’s Weekly list of the world’s 50 largest publishers, 2017. Bringing together speakers (and an audience) from both large, established publishers and newer, often technology-based start-ups, led to some interesting discussion on the relationships between the two; the responsibilities of each; and whether one or the other is best placed to cope with the disruptive forces in publishing – or themselves be disruptive.

The discussion generated by the panel was wide-ranging and insightful, broadening my understanding of the challenges, relationships and roles in publishing beyond my own. It made me think more deeply about the hugely influential and clearly disruptive issues looming over the industry, as well as the ideas and innovations which currently exist around the edges of the industry, meeting niche requirements today, but which could, in time, disrupt, engulf or evolve the whole publishing landscape.

Insights and topics of discussion that I found particularly intriguing include:

  • The symbiotic relationship between start-ups and established publishers

The opening discussion about innovation in publishing included the suggestion that it is more difficult for established companies to innovate – something easier for new-comers. However, there was also an agreement that innovation is a necessity at every tier of the industry. The conversation moved on to the common practice of publishers supporting innovation elsewhere; encouraging and funding the technological start-ups often responsible for floating fresh new ideas. The arguments were put forward that these start-ups rely on funding and support from the publishing establishment, who had a responsibility to nurture them. Yet the establishment in turn rely on the innovation of the start-ups for their own development and evolution – often acquiring them down-the-line as part of their innovation strategy – thus the relationship could be described as cyclical or symbiotic.

  • Piracy V. Green OA

Although I was relatively familiar with the term ‘Open Access’, I was not with ‘Green OA’. (This was one of the things I was inspired to google following the event, and consequently am now aware of both green and gold OA!) Reference to green OA was made in discussion of the threat and disruptive nature of piracy in the publishing industry. There was also consideration of how attitudes towards sharing have changed over time – and where the fine line now sits between piracy and OA. It was suggested that in the past, if one academic was to email an article to another based elsewhere, it would have been seen by publishers as an infringement of copyright. Now, perceptions of sharing have evolved, with the industry instead taking an observational approach; monitoring such behaviours with the intent to better understand the market. The distinction was made, however, and agreed upon unanimously by the panel, that sharing on a need-to-know basis remains different from mass-uploads by networks such as Sci-Hub. Yet it was also recognised that such ‘dark’ enterprises are also examples of innovation forcing the publishing industry to evolve. The disruptive impact of such ‘dark’ innovation was nicely summarised by Phill Jones: ‘It has forced the agenda, but at the same time, it’s not the solution.’

It’s testament to how packed, insightful and content-rich the discussion was that I could go on…! However, this blog post is already heading towards classification as a tome, so I won’t elaborate on the other interesting discussions, though will squeeze in that these included the impact of new business models such as ‘Netflix for journal articles’(!), how a trend towards trans-disciplinary research and developments in research evaluation will affect publishing, and the future of Discovery Systems.

All-in-all, I highly recommend anyone interested in learning more about a particular area of publishing, or the industry in general, goes along to a BookMachine event. Absorb what the experts have to say – it will almost certainly come in useful in the not-so-distant future – and meander your way into a conversation during the networking drinks – who knows what connections you’ll make, you might even end up writing a blog post for somebody!

A little like Where’s Wally…spot me in the stripey top! Image courtesy of Michael Belcher, Marketing Manager at Ingenta.

A little like Where’s Wally…spot me in the stripey top! Image courtesy of Michael Belcher, Marketing Manager at Ingenta.

Nb. All views are my own, and not those of Gale, Atwood Tate, or BookMachine. If I have misrepresented any of the discussion or speakers’ arguments, this is down to my own misunderstanding.

Twitter @Jessica2Edwards

https://www.linkedin.com/in/jessicaedwards1/

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Advertising Salary on Publishing Roles

Advertising Salary on Publishing Roles

Recently, there has been some discussion online about a lack of transparency in publishing recruitment in regards to agencies (and publishers) not disclosing the salaries on job adverts.

‘Available on request’?

At Atwood Tate, we disclose salary information on advertisements where we are permitted, but much of the time our clients ask us to keep this information confidential until point of enquiry.  There are a variety of reasons why employers wish to keep salary confidential or as “available on application”.  It can be because they wish to remain flexible or to maintain confidentiality across the company.  Other employees who are in similar roles may not be keen for their salary banding to be public knowledge.

We understand that this may make things seem a little more difficult for job seekers, but, although we are often not permitted to disclose the salary on the advert itself, for the vacancies we are working on we will always be happy to disclose information about the salary of the role if you are registered with us or send us your CV when you enquire about the position.

Salary advice before submission

We will always be clear on the salary range available for a job before we agree with you to submit your application.  You will have the opportunity to state your desired salary, so that expectations on this issue are managed on both sides from the outset.

In most cases, we will be able to provide greater detail than is supplied on the advert and this ensures no candidate arrives at an interview only to discover that the salary offered for a job does not meet their requirements. We are here to help on that front and can add a level of insight and transparency.

Call our Consultants

Don’t be shy of calling a telephone number on an advert for more information about the salary level. In some cases the advertiser may not be able to give you an exact figure, but in those cases, we would advise that you give the hiring manager or recruiter an idea of the salary that you would be looking for and they should be able to tell you if the position advertised would be in line with that.

At Atwood Tate, we are all for transparency and we will do our best to provide as much relevant information as possible when guiding you through the application process.

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SYP Panel Talk: “How to assert yourself in publishing”

SYP Panel Talk: “How to assert yourself in publishing”

On Tuesday night, I went to my first SYP event, which was a panel talk on “How to assert yourself in publishing”. On the panel were: Roly Allen (@roly_allen) a Publisher at Ilex, part of Hachette UK,  Bryony Woods (@BryonyWoods)  Literary Agent at Diamond Khan and Woods,  Ailah Ahmed (@ailahahmed), Commissioning Editor at Little, Brown, part of Hachette UK, and Pinelopi Pourpoutidou, Head of Foreign & Digital Sales at Michael O’Mara Publishing.

Discussion ranged from topics such as knowing when it is time to speak up in meetings, what confidence is, and whether maternity-leave affects career progression, and what can be done to change this. Here are 7 of the top tips to take away from the evening.

 

On Applications…

1. Keep your cover letters short and specific to the job

Cover letters do not need be very long. Half a side of A4 will suffice. Make it short and sharp and to the point. Outline your key skills and how they make you suitable for the requirements of the role. Investigate the company, know what they do. Say why you want to work for them and why they should want you to work for them.

2. Sell yourself in your interests.

The interests section in your CV is your chance to sell yourself, and gives the company an idea of you as a real person. Be honest, but also be professional. Do you play sports, play in a band, part of an activity/ interest club, been travelling? Make sure you share!

 

On Confidence…

3. Fake it till you make it

Few people can start in a role and have complete confidence right away. It is learnt over time as you acclimatise to the role. Being nervous as you start out is normal, but if you are not confident, you can just pretend you are. The panel suggested Amy Cuddy’s method of ‘Fake it Till You Make It”. Watch her TED Talk on it here: https://www.ted.com/talks/amy_cuddy_your_body_language_shapes_who_you_are

The panel also suggested Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg as a resource particularly for women with tips and advice on how to build confidence and how to be a successful leader in the workplace.

 4. Loudness isn’t confidence- knowing what you’re talking about is.

Don’t think that you will come across as confident just by talking louder and being brash and confrontational. Being quieter and more introverted doesn’t mean that you are less effective or less valuable. What is important is preparing your facts before you talk and share. An idea that you have investigated and can support with facts and realistic costings is much more useful than something unprepared, said loudly.

5. Form a support network, even if just an informal one.

One tip suggested, especially to benefit people from minorities with less representation in the industry, was to form a support network with people in the industry who have come from a similar background. Either in your company, or out wider out into the industry; find someone or a group of people who are at a similar stage to you, and people you feel you can confide in, and ask advice from, who you can meet up with once a month over a coffee.

6. Don’t be afraid of speaking up in meetings, but know when to stop.

If you have an idea that is relevant, share it. But if you are told it will not work, then know when to stop.

 

On Asking for More…

7. When to ask for a pay rise

The panel suggested that you should perhaps start thinking about asking for a pay rise after a year into a role. An employer should not think less of you for asking, and the worst that they can say is no. If they do reject your request, ask if you can review this decision in 3 to 6 months. They suggested that you should pick your time to ask also based on what the situation of both you and your company are. If the company is making cut backs, it might not be the correct time to ask. But if you have had a period of success (as opposed to just one success), then you should ask. Your request should make a case for your worth to the company, and why you deserve this rise.

 

This was a fascinating talk, and all the speakers were enthusiastic and entertaining. Thanks to the speakers and The SYP for hosting the event!

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A Day In The Life Of . . . A Temporary Office Manager

Temping with Atwood Tate can open up a world of opportunities and can put you on the road to employment as soon as tomorrow!

We thought we’d share some of our temps’ experiences and demonstrate the variety of roles available…

 

A Day In The Life Of . . . A Temporary Office Manager

What was your role and how long was the assignment for?

I was assigned to a trade book publisher as a Temporary Office Manager for 4 weeks.

Were you interviewed for the role?  

Yes, briefly on the morning that I started in the role. They needed someone to fill the role quickly, at short-notice, so I started working there within two days of being told about the role.

What were your key duties?

As Office Manager, I was in charge of the Post-Room, which involved distributing incoming post, and ordering couriers and franking outgoing mail. It was also my duty to monitor and report any facilities issues within the office, and also to monitor and order office supplies. I also managed the logistics of author book signings in the office. Other duties included processing invoices, general administrative duties, and various ad-hoc duties as they arose.

Tell us about the culture?

The office was a friendly and welcoming environment to work in. As the office was open plan, the different departments were all very approachable, and there was a great sense of a team effort, supporting each other, across the entire office.

What did you like best?

What I liked best about this role was that it was a busy and changing role, where there were new challenges and opportunities each day. I also enjoyed the opportunity to interact and work with all of the departments in the office.

What did you learn?

I learnt a lot about how a trade book publisher works, and how each individual department plays a vital role in bringing a new book title to fruition. I also learnt a great deal about the logistics side of publishing, from sending out new releases for promotional purposes, how to order a courier to transport a large window display. Finally, I learnt the importance of ensuring a happy office, such as getting light bulbs changed quickly, ensuring the air conditioning works and keeping coffee supplies well stocked!

How did you find your experience with Atwood Tate?

I had a great experience with Atwood Tate, being kept informed at all stages of taking on the assignment as to what was going on, and being briefed along the way as to what the role would involve and what was expected of me. They were always available to contact by phone and email whenever needed to.

How did Atwood Tate approach you for the role? Were you registered on Atwood Tate’s database or was it via a job board?

I had registered for Temping opportunities with Atwood Tate, and they contacted me asking if it would be possible for me to start in the role immediately.

Interested in temporary opportunities? Please contact Atwood Tate’s temps team administrator, Michael Lawlor, at michaellawlor@atwoodtate.co.uk

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