Tag Archives: #workinpublishing

Byte the Book: Publishing Networking at the Groucho Club

Get tips from industry professionals and have the opportunity to network with authors, agents, publishers and suppliers to the publishing industry.

This event will be at the Groucho Club. Byte the Book and Groucho members get in free. Non-member tickets are £20. If you are keen to join Byte the Book please sign up here.

Members and non-members need to sign up for a ticket to reserve their place.

Are you attending this event? Let us know!

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SYP Literary Bingo

A few of our consultants are happy to be attending the SYP (Society of Young Publishers) Literary Bingo event on the 12th April! It’s sure to be a fun night, filled with laughs and book prizes and we can’t wait to attend!
Let us know if you’re going on any of our social media accounts! We’d love for you to come and say hello!

The evening is sure to be great fun and at £3 for members and £6 for non-members it’s an affordable evening out!

To book tickets to the event you need to go to the Eventbrite page here!

You can contact us here: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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The Benefits of Being a Niche Recruitment Agency

Benefits of being a niche recruitment

The Benefits of Being a Niche Recruitment Agency

Today we wanted to share the benefits of registering with a niche recruitment agency like Atwood Tate. We’re a niche agency as we only handle recruitment within the Publishing industry; this includes publishing of books, journals, magazines and online content in these sectors: academic, educational, professional, STM, trade books, business information and events, plus companies that help deliver content (but excluding newspapers or consumer magazines).

Here are some of the benefits of our being a niche agency, and how it can help you find a job within publishing:

1.       Subject Knowledge

Being a niche agency it is particularly useful to have recruitment consultants who have experience in the industry for which we are recruiting. All of our team members have experience in publishing through past careers in Rights, Marketing, Editing and Recruitment at various publishing houses in different sectors, across the globe. This makes us specifically qualified to understand what our clients are looking for in candidates and which skills are relevant on a candidate’s CV for each job.

        2. Networking

Having a team with a past in publishing is also useful in creating contacts and networking! The publishing industry is a particularly friendly industry which often converses through social media and events on a regular basis. Because of our networking and past involvement in the industry we have contacts in nearly all sectors of publishing. As such we are a trusted recruitment agency with an exceptionally strong client list.

        3. Social Media

Since we’re a niche recruitment agency all of our social media and advice posts are focussed around the publishing industry! Whilst our advice on writing CVs and Cover Letters can be applied, mostly, across all industries, are blog posts on Design CVs and YouTube videos on Academic Publishing for example, are tailored to our candidates’ needs and requests!

        4. Strong Candidates

Our clients know that when we send them a CV we are sending them a strong applicant with all the skills required for the role. With our knowledge of the industry and our registration process we can find the perfect role for each candidate, and the perfect candidate for each role. If you haven’t got the skills or experience for a particular job just yet, we can advise you on the right direction to obtain those skills and we work with you throughout your career.

          5. Temps Desk

Temps are an incredibly useful workforce in publishing. They can help cover particularly busy times of the year, such as the London Book Fair, and fill in a role during the recruitment process. Since we’re a specialist niche agency, all of our temps have the necessary skills to come into a publishing company and do the work required without much instruction.

For more information on Atwood Tate’s services and team take a look at look at our website.

You can also contact us via social media: TwitterFacebook, LinkedInYouTube or Instagram.

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BookTube 101: An evening with Sanne Vliegenthart & BookMachine

BookTube 101

BookTube 101

On Wednesday our Administrator and Social Media Coordinator Ellie attended the BookMachine’s event: BookTube 101.

BookTube is the name given to the community of book vloggers on YouTube (channels dedicated to the discussion of books) and booktubers are the given name of the vloggers that run these channels.

One such booktuber is Sanne Vliegenthart, of BooksandQuills, who was the guest host of the event. She came to discuss the relevance of BookTube to the publishing industry and how she has developed her own BookTube channel and career.

Starting out in 2008 Sanne created her channel BooksandQuills to discuss things she was interested in. At the time she was studying for an English Literature degree, so she wanted to discuss what she was reading. Sanne also covered other topics, as BookTube was not officially a ‘thing’ until around 2011.

In 2009 she began to focus more heavily on books when she took part in the 50 Book Challenge, a challenge to read 50 books in one year. Audiences were responsive to her videos documenting her progress, and she found her subscribers growing due to the challenges popularity.

Now, in 2017, her channel has over 160,000 subscribers, 11 million views and she has created over 600 videos since 2008.

BookTube & Publishing

Sanne links her successful BookTube channel to her getting a career in publishing. She currently works as the Social Media producer for Penguin Random House, and she previously worked for Hot Key Books, an imprint of Bonnier, as Digital and Social Media Manager.

With social media being a part of our everyday lives and new jobs within publishing being created specifically to accommodate and utilise it, a background in booktubing and blogging are a growing way to break into the publishing industry. You can read our post on using blogging to get into publishing here.

Along with discussing the benefits of booktubing on her career development, Sanne also discussed the relevance of BookTube to publishers looking to develop their marketing, sales and publicity approaches.

For most booktubers in Britain, booktubing is a hobby that is done alongside a full-time job or education. Out of the close community of booktubers Sanne is a part of, none of them are professional full-time YouTubers. But many of them do have links to the publishing community.

Some are social media producers at other publishing houses, others are writers, booksellers, freelance editors, marketing assistants and more.

BookTube & Publicity

Sanne then discussed how BookTube can help publishing companies publicise books and journals, similarly, if not more so, than blogs and blog tours.

  • YouTube videos often create more comments and discussions than blog posts do.
  • They can last longer than a blog post – imagine writing a 10 minute video into a cohesive blog post.
  • It’s easy to share content and they’re visually appealing
  • Subscribers of booktubers can develop a personal connection with the booktuber, through reading tastes, professionalism and consistency of posting.

BookTube & Sales

As an example, Sanne has procured, roughly, £45,000 for the publishing industry, selling books through an affiliate link to the Book Depository.

She pointed out that this figure is from one affiliate link only. She cannot monitor the amount her subscribers are spending buying books from her recommendations in shops, online or via subscriptions to websites such as Audible.

The topic turned from how booktubers can help to how they should be approached. Since booktubing is a hobby most booktubers will only read and discuss books that they themselves want to read. Sometimes they are sent books and publicity materials from publishers, but rarely accept anything unsolicited. Often publishers will request to send a book to a booktuber, but there is no requirement that they discuss the book on their channel unless they want to.

It is clear from Sanne’s channel and statistics alone that BookTube is incredibly popular and a worthwhile consideration to the development of the publishing industry.

Our YouTube Channel

We are very interested in the topic of BookTube and hearing some tips for starting a channel from Sanne, as we ourselves have a YouTube channel. So far we have created videos on topics such as How to get a Job Interview in PublishingHow to get into Academic Publishing and shared a vlog of our time at the London Book Fair 2017, among others. We’ve recognised the potential of YouTube for the publishing industry and are utilising it for recruitment.

We want to say a big thank you to BookMachine for holding the event, and to Sanne for hosting! Ellie had a great time!

For more information contact us on any of our social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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How to use LinkedIn to get a Job

LinkedIn

How to use LinkedIn to get a Job

LinkedIn is a professional social media site, with over 225 million users, which is a great place to start when beginning a job search.

Whilst not social in the sense of funny meme sharing and night out gossip, is a great way to socialise and network with potential employers and recruiters. It is also a great hub for learning more about different industries and networking.

If you attend an event, for example the London Book Fair, and meet a publishing professional in the queue of a café, get their name and link up with them afterwards. You never know where a future encounter might take you, and having a LinkedIn account can make it so much easier!

As such, the first step is to create a LinkedIn account!

Whether you’re looking for an apprenticeship, internship, part-time, temporary or permanent role, having a LinkedIn account can be really beneficial.

Not only can you create your own LinkedIn account for people to find, you can also follow other people’s accounts and company profiles. Such as our own: Atwood Tate.

We regularly post our latest jobs, competitions, blogs, and industry news on our account so it is worth following! You can also follow our recruitment consultants and have a one-to-one way of communicating and access to their latest jobs in their sector of job type.

For example: Karine Nicpon handles Editorial roles in B2B and will post these jobs to her LinkedIn account.

But firstly, you need your own account.

Here are some simple tips on how to make your account as professional as possible and use LinkedIn to get a job:

  • Make sure your profile photo is clear and professional. Do not upload a picture of yourself on your latest night out or of striking a silly pose. Use a photo that shows your whole face, is un-blurred and looks professional but approachable.
  • Add your experience – LinkedIn is more social than a CV so you don’t have to be as thoroughly detailed or structured, you can describe your roles with simple bullet points or a brief description. You can also write in first person rather than third.
  • Use keywords – some recruiters search by specific words, for example we search for the keyword Publishing and, depending on roles we have in, editorial or publishing sales etc. But you can also include keywords like office experience, languages, B2B, admin experience etc
  • Fill out everything! If you have volunteer experience, however small, add it, along with any accomplishments you are proud of and any skills or hobbies that you have.
  • Include your contact details – these will only be available to people that you accept as followers, but a recruiter will need them to get in contact with you about potential jobs.
  • Upload a CV! As a recruiter this is really important to us, as this will hold more details on your education, background and specific skills. It is also what a recruiter will need for when they later put you forward for jobs!

Once you have made your LinkedIn account as professional as possible you can follow people!

Companies:

  • Follow companies you are interested in for information on their business, where they’re based, their company size and any jobs that they are advertising.
  • Follow the companies that you have worked for in the past, however small. Link them to your work experience categories to give more information to future employees!
  • Follow recruitment companies for information on their latest jobs! You can see our current jobs on LinkedIn here.

Contacts:

  • Contact friends, colleagues and family to link up as contacts. Not only can you stay in touch (it is a social network after all) but you can also endorse each other’s skills! This lets companies/recruiters know that you’re telling the truth when you say you have experience in HTML, French and Networking, for example.
  • Follow old colleagues and tutors/teachers for potential referrals for future jobs. The more contacts you have the better.
  • Follow recruitment consultants or HR recruiters at potential companies you would like to work for. They might get in touch directly in future.

Now you’ve created your profile and linked up with people you can start applying for roles advertised on companies LinkedIn pages. You can even search for potential roles in the search bar and get job alerts to let you know when a job fitting your preferences and previous job searches becomes available.

We hope that this post helps you with your job search! And we hope that you’ll come and follow us on our LinkedIn account for more details and news on all our latest jobs, our business and industry news. You can also follow us on our other social media accounts: Twitter, Facebook, YouTube or Instagram.

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Brexit: Good News or Bad News for the Publishing Industry?

Brexit: Good or Bad News

Brexit – Good News or Bad News for the Publishing Industry?

Brexit has been one of the talking points of this year’s London Book Fair. It was no surprise to find the Olympia Room heaving with seminar attendees, attending a seminar on the effects of brexit on publishing so far, and to come.

The panel included:

  • Rosa Wilkinson – Director of Stakeholder Engagement for Trade Policy at the Department for International Trade
  • Ian Hudson – CEO of DK, and previous CEO of Penguin Random House (English Language) and deputy CEO of Penguin Random House UK.
  • Nick Hilman – Director at Higher Education Policy Institute

Chaired by:

The seminar was an hour long and full of a lot of interesting points.

Rosa Wilkinson was quick to reassure the audience that the government is preparing for the UK’s exit from the EU in two years’ time.

Her department are researching the different streams of trade and business within the UK, opening dialogues with industries – including the publishing industry – to learn what they need to get out of brexit after Article 50 is enacted.

The trade department feels ‘like the fat end of the funnel’. They are gathering as much information as possible to help the UK understand the benefits and opportunities they have from leaving the EU.

Her final lines of her opening thoughts were that she thinks brexit will be good for the publishing industry. But she can’t be sure. She will work hard to make it possible however.

Ian Hudson’s views were positive, yet wary. He doesn’t believe brexit has to be bad economically, and that we can use it for our advantage.

For example, using DK as his prime example, 75% of DK products are printed by the printers outside of the UK in Europe and the Far East. Brexit could offer the chance for UK printers to compete on international markets.

His main concerns focused more towards the staffing issues publishing companies may face; with Brexit causing so much uncertainty for EU citizens living in Britain, and British citizens living in the EU.

DK is a global publishing company:

  • 63 different languages
  • 1000 employees worldwide
  • 500 in London, 81 members of the London staff do not own British passports

Diversity and international talent is crucial to DK, but also to Britain as Britain is multi-cultural country. Publishing companies need to be able to recruit worldwide to develop books for the global market.

He stated that it was ‘inhuman’ that Theresa May hasn’t yet guaranteed a right to remain to European staff within Britain. It not only affects the employees currently working in Britain but also the future recruitment of European citizens to Britain.

When the floor was opened for questions HarperCollins CEO Charlie Redmayne stated that Polish workers in the HarperCollins Scottish outposts were ‘going back home’ over the uncertainty of brexit, the effect of the falling pound on earnings and the lack of control and security over their own jobs.

Hudson believes that Government needs to be less populist about immigration and understand that the publishing industry needs people from abroad for language, culture and skills that aren’t necessarily nurtured or found easily within this country. Doing something about immigration when Brexit first happened was just ‘doing something’, he claimed.

He also discussed the topic of Copyright and Piracy laws. Previously these laws within which affect Britain were passed within the EU. But with brexit Britain has the chance to create their own laws for copyright and piracy laws. It is the chance for the government to create a robust framework, as he feels Britain have been the voice of reason within the EU about the laws.

Nick Hilman main focus was on the effects of Brexit on academic publishing and research within the UK.

He feels that the University’s within Britain did not play their hand very well. They did not listen to the communities within which their universities were situated or their students.

In one university more than a quarter of all students wanted UKIP campaigns to be banned from their university entirely. Another university believed so strongly that the community surrounding the campus was going to vote remain that they didn’t campaign, and all of the constituencies actually voted leave. For these mistakes the universities, research facilities and academic sector are now suffering the consequences.

The main concern within academia and research is the freedom of movement for students and staff. In recent studies it is thought that with Brexit the number of EU students attending British universities will fall by 57%, if they’re not entitled to tuition loans and have to pay full international fees. University and Academic staff are suffering the same uncertainty of DK staff members, with over 20,000 staff members from Europe concerned about their freedom of movement. Many are already choosing to leave already.

Hilman did strike a positive; with Brexit comes the opportunity for Britain to delve deeper into research, such as nanotechnology, space research and other science research, which was blocked by the EU previously. But funding promised to academia has yet to be given and there is uncertainty that such funding will be received after Article 50 is enacted.

Hilman’s main steps for the future:

  • The government need to confirm the funding arrangement for EU students starting courses in 2018.
  • Staff mobility at UK universities needs to be at the heart of the Brexit communications going forward
  • The outward mobility of students, and publishers, from Britain going abroad should be encouraged. For British workers to bring back knowledge and understanding for labour markets going forward.
  • There needs to be more support for academia

The panel was then open for follow up remarks.

Wilkinson stated that recruitment from international audiences would not be a problem. No one is going to be kicked out of the country. She encouraged the need to retain talent and to recruit talent to Britain. She also stated that Copyright laws were high on their list of important topics to discuss and clarify further, as well as the grants for funding for the smaller businesses and industries.

We are leaving the EU, not the planet,’ she said. Reminding everyone that Britain still holds a voice within the world’s industry.

At the end of the interesting and heated panel the chair, Stephen asked one question to the audience:

Is Brexit good news or bad news for publishing?

The vote of hands was unanimous: bad news.

 

What are your thoughts on brexit and the publishing industry? Let us know via our social media or on in the comments below: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

 

 

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Our Plans for the London Book Fair & Giveaway

Plans for London Book Fair & Giveaway

Our Plans for the London Book Fair & Giveaway

With the London Book Fair officially one week away we thought we would share with you our plans for the event!

Every day of the fair there will be at least 5 members of the Atwood Tate staff milling around Olympia, either at our stand, in the Ivy Club or around the fair.

When we are at our stand (3B26, in tech) and we’re not deep in conversation , feel free to approach us. During the week we do have meetings throughout the day so we may not always be available to chat – as much as we’d like to!

You can still take a look at our stand however! We will be bringing a lot of things with us:

  • Leaflets – with all our information and details about our services
  • Printables – Are you looking for work experience? Or useful information about getting into publishing? We will have some print outs available with some resources for you!
  • Sweets – One of the most important things at any book fair: sugary sustenance.
  • Current Vacancies – We’ll have a list of all of our current vacancies at our stand as well.

We will also be on social media a lot! Not only during the London Book Fair but this week as well!

Competitions

This year we are also running competitions! The first is a Giveaway: Win £100 worth of vouchers by liking and sharing our LinkedIn page! Starting from tomorrow (8th March) and ending on the 16th of March, the last day of the London Book Fair, you could win a great prize! And all you have to do is follow our LinkedIn page and share the post on Twitter. For more entries you can also share and like our LinkedIn posts on this Giveaway!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Also, if you follow us on Twitter you may have noticed a certain competition we’re starting for this year’s Book Fair!

The first person to come up to us, on each day of the London Book Fair, and says: ‘Atwood Tate we hear you’re great’ will win a £10 book voucher!

The earlier you get to our stand (3B26) and say this, the better. We’ll announce when someone has won the prize each day on our Twitter feed. However please respect the consultants work; if they’re in a meeting at the stand please don’t disturb them. The fair is an industry event after all.

Other Plans

On Tuesday 14th you may spot our Administrator Ellie wandering around with a camera as she films a London Book Fair Vlog for our YouTube channel! Be sure to say hello and tell us your thoughts on the London Book Fair if you get a chance!

On Thursday 16th, between 2:30pm-5:00pm, two of our Consultants: Karine Nicpon & Alison Redfearn will be attending the Career’s Clinic. You can bring your CV and have a quick 5 minute chat with them about the next step in your career!

All in all we have a lot going on!

Make sure you follow us across all our social media, and use the hashtag #LBF17, to keep up to date with what is happening at the Fair. As well as receive advice, hints and tips on what to bring and see at the London Book Fair: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

We can’t wait to meet you all!

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Types of Sales Roles in B2B Publishing

Types of Sales Roles B2B

Types of Sales Roles in B2B Publishing

There are many different types of sales roles within publishing. It is worth asking what type of sales role you are applying for, and highlighting which type you’ve done on your CV, when applying for a job.

Our Sales Consultant in the London office, Olivia, has put together a list of the key types of sales roles to explain further.

The key types are:

  • Delegate – selling delegate spaces (i.e. tickets) to attend events and conferences
  • Sponsorship – selling sponsorship opportunities for events. It can also refer to sponsored editorial content, which is when companies pay to publish an article in your publication as a way of promoting their own brand.
  • Advertising – selling advertising space. Can be either print (e.g. a print publication or magazine) or online (eg. a website). It can also be classified (i.e. no graphics, inexpensive small messages) or display (these include graphics and colour and might take up half a page or more).
  • Subscriptions – selling a subscription to a product. Can be print (e.g. a print publication or magazine) or digital (e.g. an online database or service).
  • Conference production – this isn’t really classified as media sales. It’s basically a varied mix of sales, marketing, editorial and project management but for entry level conference production roles clients usually want someone with some sales experience, such as delegate sales.

A B2B Sales role, for example, could involve just one or several of these types of sales. It’s quite common to see delegate and sponsorship sales together or delegate and subscriptions.

Generally the skill set required for each type of sales role, and the types of clients they deal with, will be similar. But it’s always best to check with our consultants beforehand which ones the role involves just to avoid confusion.

For more information about Sales roles you can view our current vacancies page and select Sales in preferences.

You can also contact us on info@atwoodtate.co.uk or 020 7034 7900. Or via social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

 

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Companies: Why You Should Consider Temps

Why You Should Consider Temps

Companies: Why You Should Consider Temps

Our articles on temping have typically been to inform candidates of the many benefits that come with temping, both professionally and personally. But today, we’d like to point out the many reasons why temping is such a useful avenue for clients to consider.

  • The flexibility of temps also means company flexibility.

If you’re expanding your team but you’re not quite prepared to hire a permanent person, a temporary employee is a great way to establish exactly what it is you need in terms of additional resources. Maybe you’ve never had extra hands on deck and you’re only now starting to realise the new objectives you can tackle. A temp-to-perm scenario can be a match made in heaven for company and employee alike. As someone grows into a newly created role and reveals the kind of results that can be produced with more staff. The manager can then take these results to HR as Exhibit A on what expanding the team can mean for everyone.

But more than that,

  • Temps bring their own expertise with them.

They don’t need to be entry-level candidates acting as a stop-gap. By hiring consultants or veteran freelancers, a company also gets to avail of a temporary worker’s own experiences, the different business practices they’ve witnessed in their time. New blood often means new ideas and even if the worker doesn’t stick around, their contributions can last forever.

And, of course,

  • Temporary workers can provide much needed breathing space to permanent employees.

When the day-to-day administration is taken off their hands, they’re able to concentrate on the bigger picture and implement the projects. This improve service and streamline practices. You can get a lot done when you don’t have to sweat the small stuff. Even if it’s only for a little while.

So, for anyone who’s currently reviewing team numbers or work-loads, don’t commit until you know for sure exactly what you need – try a temp today! Get in touch with Kellie Millar, who manages our Temps and Freelancers desk, or her colleague, Alison Redfearn, and they can send you more workers than you can shake a stick at!

5 reasons to get a temp:

  • Cover sick leave
  • Cover holiday
  • Help with a project
  • Flexibility – have for 1 day / 1 week / 1 month…
  • No admin – we cover all payment, NI, holiday pay, pension

Kellie Millar
E: kelliemillar@atwoodtate.co.uk
Tel: 02070347897

Alison Redfearn
E: alisonredfearn@atwoodtate.co.uk
Tel: 02070347922

You can also contact us with any questions via our social media pages: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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5 Reasons Why You Should Attend the London Book Fair 2017

London Book Fair 2017

5 Reasons Why You Should Attend the London Book Fair 2017

The London Book Fair 2017 is fast approaching. It will be happening on the 14th-16th of March at the beautiful Olympia in Hammersmith.

It is an opportunity for all those in the publishing industry to meet and discuss publishing, with the main focus of the fair being on the literary agents as they sell book rights in the International Rights Centre. This is an event to learn, observe and discover the latest trends within publishing, with a lot of publishing’s finest under one roof.

The exhibition floors will be filled with publishers, agents, recruitment consultants and writers. It is a brilliant place to mingle and learn more about the publishing industry if you any, or wanting to be, any of the above.

Here are 5 Reasons why you should attend the London Book Fair:

  • There is a Careers Clinic and recruitment agencies attending

Bring your CV and book a place at the Career’s Clinic. At the clinic you get 5 minutes to speak to a specialist recruitment agent who can discuss jobs and offer advice, and even take your CV for further review.

We will be attending the Careers Clinic, as we did last year, with our consultants offering advice. More info on this over the next few weeks!

Recruitment agencies will also have their own stands throughout the fair, at which you can approach them for a chat.

  • Networking Opportunities

Yes, that dreaded word appears again. The London Book Fair has a busy atmosphere, but it is the perfect place to meet people within the publishing industry, and ask questions where suitable.

Each publisher within the industry will have their own stand, but there are other opportunities to network as well: seminars, meetings and clinics. Also queues! The queues for food can sometimes get quite large but you can always strike up a conversation at this point. Be open and friendly.

For more advice on Networking check out this blog post our temps team administrator Michael did!

  • Seminars & Meetings

The London Book Fair also includes seminars and discussions for anyone to attend. Some require paid tickets, but most are free – but you do need to book beforehand! Check out the LBF Insight Guide for a look at all of the seminars at the event!

You could attend the Byte the Book Networking event on the 14th of March or attend the Careers Clinic. Or, if you’re a writer, book a meeting with the Society of Authors.

  • The Publishing Sectors

The London Book Fair is the perfect opportunity to learn more about all the sectors of publishing. From Academic to B2B, Trade to Print and Production.

From viewing the stands to networking with the stand-holders, this is a great opportunity to learn more about the publishing industry as a whole. With over 2000 exhibitors over three days this is a fascinating experience for anyone looking to enter the publishing world.

  • Attend with Friends

This is a great event to attend with fellow publishing candidates, be it already in publishing or looking to enter the industry. It can be a lot easier to mingle with others when you have a friend to go with you, and the event is quite social.

You can always grab a coffee or some food at one of the many cafes, discuss the event, walk around together or attend seminars together. It is much a social event as it is a professional one.

Make sure you book your LBF ticket in advance though. Tickets cost £40 per person for the three day fair. Book here!

So there are 5 reasons to attend the London Book Fair 2017. We will be releasing more information as we creep nearer to the event! And we can’t wait to see you at the Careers Clinic. Don’t leave it too long before you book your place at the clinic, these places tend to go quickly!

Want to learn more about the London Book Fair? Check out there website or follow them on Twitter. They will be live tweeting throughout the day, as will many other publishers, so keep an eye on social media over the week.

You can also follow us on social media to stay up to date: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube or Instagram.

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